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Python in my pants.

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My Django project deadline went whizzing past. I was stressed about it and have postponed my time off work until I get more of it finished, but I'm less worried now.

Two coders for 5 weeks turned out to be me for five weeks and the other guy for half that because he had a couple of weeks off, and as of now (8 days after the original deadline) the client still hasn't given me any of the text for the site or signed off on the mock-up graphics, and has changed the spec more than once. That's mostly why I don't stress anymore. It's actually how most projects seem to go - the clients demand instant results and then fail to care anyway. What I feel bad about is saying "yes" when asked if it was going to be finished on time. If I could go back in time, I'd say, "yes, provided you don't change anything and I get all the resources I need".

Regardless of whether this project is going to be successful or not, I've learned a lot. I am now happy working in python - I've made progress on re-writing a game in python for my own amusement and played around with some existing desktop apps - and still loving django. I've rewritten my django code a couple of times after forehead-smacking moments when I realised I was being far too complicated in my methods and have got to the stage where I am actually pretty pleased with myself.

Where I've gone back and used PHP while maintaining other sites I've found myself just wanting to get the work out the way so I can get back to python. I'm such a fanboy now.
There is one big PHP project I inherited that I worked on for about 10 months which I might end up continuing after this django app is finished, but oh god I hope not.

What else have I learned? I've learned that cheesy 80s metal played too loud makes me much more productive. Hold on, I knew that already. I've learned nothing!

7 Comments On This Entry

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alias120 Icon

14 September 2010 - 02:24 PM
I completely agree with the last statement. Have you any experience with Python in the past? I heard that they added support for OOP not too long ago, how is that working out?
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moopet Icon

14 September 2010 - 03:29 PM

alias120, on 14 September 2010 - 08:24 PM, said:

I completely agree with the last statement. Have you any experience with Python in the past? I heard that they added support for OOP not too long ago, how is that working out?


I made a popup notification service in python with Qt a year or two ago. Took a couple of days from start to finish, and was pretty easy to pick up the basics. I was at the kind of "can understand and tweak someone else's code with a handy book or google" stage really. I didn't realise it wasn't OO before, though?
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alias120 Icon

14 September 2010 - 06:01 PM
I shouldn't say I know that for sure, a friend of mine recently began learning Python and was telling me how they support OOP now. He made it sound as if OOP was not always available. Python was the first language I ever used, but I did nothing more than simple I/O and knew nothing of OOP at that time.
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eker676 Icon

14 September 2010 - 06:56 PM
I just got into python but I'm really starting to like its inter-language capabilities. ( I haven't use them yet but I'm anxiously waiting too ). I think it will really simplify some tasks. Something that could take a while in Java, C#, or C/C++ can be written in a few minutes and added to your main application.

The possibilities are endless.
You need to use huge numbers? Do it in python, import it into your other app and your good to go.

I'm just curious how python stacks up performance wise to other languages. I know it's slower because it is essentially a 'scripting' language but does it take big performance hits? ( I've been messing around with huge numbers and python doesn't even stutter )
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moopet Icon

15 September 2010 - 02:09 AM
Django is slower than the PHP frameworks I've used, but it saves itself in other ways: it has a pretty good caching backend that helps and it's generally way more powerful. The ORM is awesome sauce.
Anyway, as to the scripting side of things, python pre-compiles stuff on first run so it's more comparable to java byte code than to PHP, for instance. I've not really noticed anything going slow that I couldn't find a more likely culprit for than python, but ymmv.
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W3bDev Icon

15 September 2010 - 11:03 AM
First of all, great subject... lol.

Anyways, I personally prefer .net these days, use to use PHP for nearly everything, but being a former C++ guy, and loving web development, C#/ASP.NET just seemed to fit right for me... and MVC is pretty sweet as well.

As far as clients go, I agree with the whole 'expectations' thing.... they always expect a project to be done in a certain timeframe, yet they never meet your deadlines that you set up for content delivery.

Oh well, what can you do?
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moopet Icon

16 September 2010 - 09:21 AM

W3bDev, on 15 September 2010 - 05:03 PM, said:

First of all, great subject... lol.

Anyways, I personally prefer .net these days, use to use PHP for nearly everything, but being a former C++ guy, and loving web development, C#/ASP.NET just seemed to fit right for me... and MVC is pretty sweet as well.

As far as clients go, I agree with the whole 'expectations' thing.... they always expect a project to be done in a certain timeframe, yet they never meet your deadlines that you set up for content delivery.

Oh well, what can you do?


I'm originally a C/C++ guy, too. Probably why I used to defend PHP in computing arguments because a lot of its flaws seemed to stem from taking C paradigms and shoving them into something that makes web pages. I hear people saying good things about .NET these days and understand that it's pretty powerful, but it's just not my cup of tea.
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