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In your opinion, what has made you a good programmer? Or, to open up the question even further, what do you believe it takes to be a good programmer? It is a daunting task, joining the world of software development. I have been learning C++ for about half a year now, and even though I know I am much more knowledgable than I was half a year ago I have a long way to go. I have an interest in .NET development, and once I feel I have a strong foundation in C++ I plan to begin learning C#. I know that this will not be enough though. I frequently browse job requirements for .NET developers, and notice that it is not uncommon to be expected to know ASP.NET, AJAX and MSSQL along with C# or VB. I don't necessarily see this as a bad thing, the persuit of knowledge never is. Do you find it difficult to broaden your skill set beyond application development to web development as well as database development? I would like to keep my focus on high level languages and application development, but it does appear I will have to be a jack of all trades to have any chance in the job market.

Thoughts, opinions?

-alias

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KYA Icon

25 March 2010 - 06:38 PM
Not sure if you saw this thread a few weeks back, but I think it sums up the feelings of most of us here.

In a nutshell, the HR people know shit all about the actual technical requirements of the position so they write up a laundry list of phrases they know to be technologies or languages, thereby casting a wide net in the hopes that they might get one or two candidates who know one or two things listed on the job requirements page. We live in a buzzword time, much to my chagrin.

A jack of all trades is a master in nothing, for better or for worse.
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alias120 Icon

25 March 2010 - 06:50 PM
I had noticed that topic a few weeks ago, it was interesting to read. I couldn't agree more with this, "A jack of all trades is a master in nothing, for better or for worse." As I said in my post, I completely enjoy the persuit of knowledge and expanding my skill set is not a problem. Where the problem would arise is when I have accumulated general knowledge of many topics with a mastery in none. I believe that a general understanding of some topics is necessary, how could I design a mobile application if I knew nothing of TCP or any other networking protocol. Should I be expected to pass the CCNA with my eyes closed? Absolutely not. That is not my specialty. I should have a limited understanding of how IP routing works, and which protocols I will need to utilize specific ports.

Anyways, I suppose that all one can do is attempt be as knowledgable as possible without sacrificing their bread and butter.
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KYA Icon

26 March 2010 - 01:08 PM
My goal wasn't to direct any issue towards you, but rather the companies that "overask"; no one is going to know PHP/ASP.NET/LAMP/WAMP/MySQL/SQL/C/Java/C++ and have 5 years networking experience, it's ridiculous.
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alias120 Icon

26 March 2010 - 03:14 PM
I agree, and I apologize if my previous statement sounded as if I was taking issue to what you said. That is not the case I assure you. I suppose I will see first hand what the job market is like before too long here. The thought is as exciting as it is nerve racking.

-alias
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