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#1 skyhawk133  Icon User is offline

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Finding a Job After Graduation

Posted 26 May 2009 - 12:48 PM

For those of you who graduated recently, how is the job hunt coming along? I'm lots of people graduating with comp sci degrees and settling for $8/hour retail jobs because nobody is hiring right now.

What's the landscape look like right now?
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Replies To: Finding a Job After Graduation

#2 Elcric  Icon User is offline

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Re: Finding a Job After Graduation

Posted 26 May 2009 - 01:22 PM

:D Hello,

I am not looking for work but I have two things to say to those of you who are.

First, now is the time to be in school.

The economy always goes down and up, look at american historical statistics, its just life.

When the economy goes down is the time to be in school, any type of school, as long as you are improving yourself.

When my dad's dad was young, having a high school education was rare. People with high school educations where looked up to. Lots of people did not know how to read. Not because they were not smart but because they were uneducated.

When my dad was young america had changed. To be competitive in the job market you had to have a college degree, any college degree.

When I was young everyone in my field had a master's degree. All my friends had masters degrees. Everyone I worked with had masters degrees.

Go go school! Get a doctorate degree. A doctorate is what makes you stand out in the job market today. And, if you are so inclined a doctorate is wonderful for being in business for yourself. Lots of people are earning a very good living out of their home. Lots of people travel the world working for themselves as consultants.

When the economy is good and it will be good again, sooner than most think. You will be glad you went to school.

Everyone can think of excuses for not being in school. Some say they are too busy, they do not have the money, they have other things more important to do, etc. Go to school.

Second, be willing to relocate. We are a world community now. People no longer work in one place, and live in one place; they travel. People who are willing to relocate can find jobs. People who are willing to travel can find jobs. Combine the two if you want a family. Have a home as a base and travel to wherever the work is, visit your family on week ends and holidays. Or, if you are really creative, work out of your home. Access to the internet for a creative person makes the entire world their job location. Email, zip files, and lots of cool software lets people have face to face meetings with people all over the world via the internet without leaving home. Problems can be emailed to you at home to solve and solving those problems at home can earn you money.

I know I will hear a lot of excuses for not being in school; however, that is all they are, excuses.
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#3 prajayshetty  Icon User is offline

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Re: Finding a Job After Graduation

Posted 27 May 2009 - 06:02 AM

ya he is telling the truth this time it is to pursue higher education's and other certificates so that you are ready to go when you the economy comes up and it would be a matter of 1 or 2 years or few months for that to happen

This post has been edited by prajayshetty: 27 May 2009 - 06:03 AM

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#4 janeSays  Icon User is offline

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Re: Finding a Job After Graduation

Posted 27 May 2009 - 11:55 PM

I've received my bachelors in Graphic Design and I'm going back to a smaller more expensive school for Web Programming because I thought it would help with finding a job and I'm interested in the field.

I have a job right now that is giving me related experience in Graphic Design/Web Dev and it's paying me horribly and conflicting with my expensive education. I'm so unbalanced I need like a week off work to catch up with school and sleep. I cant take time off, I just got promoted (without the raise) to do graphic design full time instead of the other repetitive crap they had me doing. It's a young business with a young CEO and I'm exhausted from the rate of productivity we are expected to meet just so the business can turn a profit. My guess is that their profit will be huge in the next few months, too bad they are building so I probably won't see it.

I suggest to the initial author of this forum topic and all of you, that you don't settle for less than you're worth right now at a job that has nothing to do with your degree. If you are going to settle for less than your worth find some related experience. There is not a bright outlook for young college grads right now which is why I am stressed about making the most out of the education but not sacrificing related experience. I would think that programming is where it's at in the job market. Here is why...

Saving money is a big deal for business with the high cost of health care and the economy, business is nervous about profit. Maybe you write a program for a time clock that calculates PTO and OT and outputs to the accounting dept for easy processing of the payroll. Or you might write a program for a company that needs some type of online employment application. Emphasize efficiency when you walk in to an interview. Let them know you are going to save them money in the long run.

It all starts with a good resume. Then if you have sample work, show it off. If you don't have sample work don't worry just get yourself out there get hired and get some sample work.

This post has been edited by janeSays: 28 May 2009 - 12:02 AM

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#5 Sue816  Icon User is offline

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Re: Finding a Job After Graduation

Posted 30 May 2009 - 05:28 PM

In Chicago, there seem to be plenty of IT jobs. I don't have a lot of years of experience, only about 3, but when I sent my resume to a few IT staffing companies, I got a great response and a couple of interviews. If you're looking for a job and live in a bigger metro area, sending your resume to an IT placement firm is a great way to get a first job.
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#6 outerlimit  Icon User is offline

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Re: Finding a Job After Graduation

Posted 31 May 2009 - 10:01 PM

I just graduated from Virginia Tech with a degree in Computer Engineering.

I went on several job interviews and almost all of them returned with a job offer.

Most of my friends who graduated as well also had a job lined up.
Only a few of them did not, and for them I blame laziness because they did not go out to the job fairs and on campus interviews.
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#7 lalchand  Icon User is offline

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Re: Finding a Job After Graduation

Posted 04 June 2009 - 01:26 PM

i am also finding difficulty in getting a job after successfully completed my education,but there are some opening in the IT sector for those who are having experience around 3-5 years,as per the current situation freshers are really facing a though time.
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#8 KYA  Icon User is offline

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Re: Finding a Job After Graduation

Posted 06 June 2009 - 05:57 PM

It's either the economy or I'm just not looking in the right places (or I'm terrible?). Out of several dozen resume "droppings" I've gotten two interviews.

To me, it should not be this hard for a soon to be new CS grad to find some sort of entry level work. Perhaps because most of the work I see is for web development and I'm not solid on that enough to apply for a job for it.

Maybe it's just me? It's damn frustrating.
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#9 Programmist  Icon User is offline

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Re: Finding a Job After Graduation

Posted 08 June 2009 - 03:08 PM

I'm employed, but always looking for other opportunities, so I've had my eye on the jobs over the past 6-12 months. Toward the latter half of 2008 the job postings started to decrease sharply. Up until March there were stretches of 5 days where there were no job postings at all. Now there are plenty of job postings, but there is a huge difference from those posted year ago. For instance, (and the most obvious) the pay is WAY down. Contract jobs that paid $50-60/hr are now paying 45-50/hr. Salaried jobs are down too. Another, more insidious difference I notice is the redefining of "junior/mid-level/senior" categories. Just as pay scales have decreased, experience needed to fit one of those categories has increased. I remember when 5-7 years of experience was the norm for a senior position, and 7-10 was the norm for architect positions. Those scales have both increased by 2-3 years. So, not only has the pay gone down for these positions, but the years-of-experience requirements have gone up. Most of the jobs I see now also require a bachelors degree, whereas this time last year they usually threw in the "or equivalent experience" clause. And, as if these last three things werenít enough, I've noticed yet another disturbing trend. Your Java (or your language of choice) developer position may not be a Java developer position. I've see "Java Developer" positions listed where "Java/J2EE" are at the bottom of the list of required skills with C#.NET, ASP.NET, MS SQL Server, and many other non-Java skills at the top. Don't get me wrong. I'm all for diversifying one's skill set, but putting .NET as a more important requirement for a Java developer job is just messed up. And it's not just one or two positions. I've seen this kind of thing a lot. Not only that, but experience with esoteric software that used to be nice-to-have is now required.

This last one is a new one on me, but the previous three are familiar from the 2001 crash when I was laid off looking for work. Short-sighted employers will always take advantage of the surplus of job seekers by doing stuff like this. It seems unfair, but in fact, karma eventually comes back to bite them. When the economy recovers, those people that they hired at a bargain usually leave post-haste for a better job elsewhere. I remember this happened at one company I worked for. This company was particularly bad in how it exploited the job seeker surplus and found itself with a mass exodus of desperately-needed skill when the job market improved.

But don't despair. Things are looking up. I saw 50-something job postings on indeed.com in my area for "Java J2EE." That's not an overwhelming amount and, yes, many of them fall prey to the problems listed above, but it's better than 0 job postings. Also, those requirements are not always required. Just because they want someone with 2 years experience, doesnít mean they wonít accept someone with 1. If a company falsely inflates its requirements because of the job-seeker surplus and canít find anyone to meet them, itíll typically settle for the best candidate. So, donít let those requirements stop you from applying Ė especially if youíre close to meeting them. Just be prepared to sell to them how/why you make up the difference.
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