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#1 kewlkreator  Icon User is offline

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DIC Programming DICtionary

Posted 11 July 2009 - 06:28 AM

This is DreamInCode's programming dictionary o' words. Post your words with their definition. Then add some more.

DIC = DreamInCode, the best programming community on th web.
HTML = HyperText Markup Language, a programming language made to design websites.
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#2 Raynes  Icon User is offline

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Re: DIC Programming DICtionary

Posted 11 July 2009 - 07:31 AM

Referential Transparency = A Referentially Transparent function is one which can be replaced with it's value at any time. Pure functions are by definition Referentially Transparent, as they have no side effects. An example of a referentially transparent function would be this Clojure function that adds 2 numbers.

(defn plus [n1 n2]
  (+ n1 n2))



This function will always return the same result for the same arguments. It can be replaced with it's value in code at any time. It is, by definition, Referentially Transparent.

Further reading: http://en.wikipedia....mputer_science)

This post has been edited by Raynes: 11 July 2009 - 07:33 AM

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#3 Locke  Icon User is offline

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Re: DIC Programming DICtionary

Posted 11 July 2009 - 11:54 AM

View Postkewlkreator, on 11 Jul, 2009 - 07:28 AM, said:

HTML = HyperText Markup Language, a programming language made to design websites.


First...that's wrong. HTML is just what it says. A MARKUP language. Not programming. Common misconception. :)

This post has been edited by Locke: 11 July 2009 - 11:54 AM

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#4 paperclipmuffin  Icon User is offline

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Re: DIC Programming DICtionary

Posted 13 July 2009 - 02:17 AM

AJAX: Asynchronous Javascript and XML. An awesome combo of many languages to make even more awesome webpage bits. :P
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#5 kewlkreator  Icon User is offline

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Re: DIC Programming DICtionary

Posted 13 July 2009 - 06:03 AM

View PostLocke, on 11 Jul, 2009 - 10:54 AM, said:

View Postkewlkreator, on 11 Jul, 2009 - 07:28 AM, said:

HTML = HyperText Markup Language, a programming language made to design websites.


First...that's wrong. HTML is just what it says. A MARKUP language. Not programming. Common misconception. :)

Uh... dude, you're making me look bad...
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#6 Jaakuuta  Icon User is offline

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Re: DIC Programming DICtionary

Posted 22 July 2009 - 05:22 AM

Recursion: Something that defines itself through recursion. This definition is an example of recursion.

Iteration: Going through something by repeating a procedure over and over and over...

LISP: List - Processing

Array: A set of related data stored contiguously in memory
List: A set of memory that's linked together in memory via pointers, but is not necessarily contiguous
Stack: A type of list that follows the LIFO principle
Queue: A type of list that follows the FIFO principle

LIFO: last in-first out
FIFO: first in-first out

Pointer: a piece of data that represents the address of another memory location where memory is stored rather than actual memory. Also known as indirect addressing.

Currying: a method whereby one is able to turn a function of several variables into a composed function of functions of single variables

Self-referential: this definition is self-referential

Procedure/Subroutine/Function/Method: These are all basically used to refer to the idea of branching off and completing a separate segment of code by pushing the instruction counter address onto the stack before branching, then popping it back off and returning flow control to the previous location in memory once the operation is performed. This may or may not carry a returned value with it. These each have a subtle shade of meaning associated with them. For example, a method is usually used to refer to a behavior associated with an object in OOP.

OOP: Object-Oriented Programming: The idea that everything around can be modeled into an object with certain attributes and behaviors that can interact with other objects around it in a variety of ways via its behaviors.

Functional Programming: The idea that programs should consist of a series of functions in which there are no side effects. This is somewhat in contrast to OOP as it usually carries a list of data values to represent the attributes of an object which cause side effects.
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#7 Locke  Icon User is offline

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Re: DIC Programming DICtionary

Posted 22 July 2009 - 04:20 PM

View Postkewlkreator, on 13 Jul, 2009 - 07:03 AM, said:

Uh... dude, you're making me look bad...


Sorry, but I think someone on a programming/webdev help site should know the difference. ;)
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#8 Pwn  Icon User is offline

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Re: DIC Programming DICtionary

Posted 23 July 2009 - 06:39 PM

View Postkewlkreator, on 13 Jul, 2009 - 07:03 AM, said:

View PostLocke, on 11 Jul, 2009 - 10:54 AM, said:

View Postkewlkreator, on 11 Jul, 2009 - 07:28 AM, said:

HTML = HyperText Markup Language, a programming language made to design websites.


First...that's wrong. HTML is just what it says. A MARKUP language. Not programming. Common misconception. :)

Uh... dude, you're making me look bad...

Perception. You think he's telling you that you're wrong, when in reality, he's telling you that you will be right in the future. Imagine if you said that on a job interview and your interviewer knew what is what. How would you look if you presented yourself like that? You say potato, but the answer is jicama, and you tell your potential employer that he's making you look bad. What he's going to tell you is that you're making yourself look bad, and by becoming defensive, you just lost your chance at a job.

--------

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#9 SixOfEleven  Icon User is offline

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Re: DIC Programming DICtionary

Posted 23 July 2009 - 09:01 PM

Two of my favorites:

GIGO - Garbage In Garbage Out

KISS - Keep It Simple Stupid

Some others:

WYSIWYG - What You See Is What You Get
GUI - Graphical User Interface
COBOL - COmmon Business Oriented Language
BASIC - Beginner's All-purpose Symbolic Instruction Code
FORTRAN - FORmula TRANslation
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#10 Jaakuuta  Icon User is offline

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Re: DIC Programming DICtionary

Posted 24 July 2009 - 12:46 AM

eof: end of file
iff: if and only if

elif: sometimes used as a contraction of else and if
for: usually indicates a loop used while some condition is true, commonly used to traverse arrays and lists

curly-bracket languages: languages that delimit their program blocks with curly brackets { and }, such as C, C++, Java, etc.

stack-oriented: A language that makes extensive use of stacks. Data is put onto different stacks, and operations are performed by removing operands off of the stack, applying operations to them, then returning the result to the top of the stack. Some examples include some styles of assembly language, and languages like Forth.*

HTTP: hypertext transfer protocol
FTP: file transfer protocol

*please correct me if I'm wrong on this... I just started studying Forth a bit, I thought the style seemed interesting.
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