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#1 rgoodwin6  Icon User is offline

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C# Windows Forms

Posted 25 July 2009 - 02:50 PM

How useful are windows forms for real programs? Aren't they more for short, simple demo programs and to make coding in C# look easy?
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#2 RudiVisser  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Windows Forms

Posted 25 July 2009 - 02:52 PM

Whoa whoa whoa, no! What would give you that idea??

Windows Forms are just a GUI "component" (this is perhaps the wrong word), comparable to Qt, WxWidgets, etc. etc. You can use them to make anything you like.
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#3 rgoodwin6  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Windows Forms

Posted 25 July 2009 - 03:14 PM

View PostMageUK, on 25 Jul, 2009 - 01:52 PM, said:

Whoa whoa whoa, no! What would give you that idea??

Windows Forms are just a GUI "component" (this is perhaps the wrong word), comparable to Qt, WxWidgets, etc. etc. You can use them to make anything you like.

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#4 Renagado  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Windows Forms

Posted 25 July 2009 - 03:20 PM

View Postrgoodwin6, on 25 Jul, 2009 - 11:50 PM, said:

How useful are windows forms for real programs? Aren't they more for short, simple demo programs and to make coding in C# look easy?

Are you serious or are you just trolling?
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#5 rgoodwin6  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Windows Forms

Posted 25 July 2009 - 03:24 PM

View PostMageUK, on 25 Jul, 2009 - 01:52 PM, said:

Whoa whoa whoa, no! What would give you that idea??

Windows Forms are just a GUI "component" (this is perhaps the wrong word), comparable to Qt, WxWidgets, etc. etc. You can use them to make anything you like.


Don't take it the wrong way. I'm just trying to learn something. I've been writing code in C since the late 70's and I'm tyring to figure out how to migrate to C# (since C is pretty much obsolete). The thing is that the only sample code I've seen in C# uses these Windows forms and they are all trivial examples. If you are writing 1000+ lines of code, why break the flow by going to these point and click dialog box interfaces? There must be function calls that do the same thing. They didn't do away with interrupt handling functions, did they?

I suppose that more to the point of what I am trying to find out is where can I see a non trivial sample of a complex program in C#? That's what I want to begin to understand.
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#6 Renagado  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Windows Forms

Posted 25 July 2009 - 03:31 PM

OK sorry, you weren't trolling.
Take a look at our tutorial and snippets section, and you'll find some nice examples.
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#7 rgoodwin6  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Windows Forms

Posted 25 July 2009 - 03:34 PM

View PostRenagado, on 25 Jul, 2009 - 02:31 PM, said:

OK sorry, you weren't trolling.
Take a look at our tutorial and snippets section, and you'll find some nice examples.



OK, Thanks.
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#8 Renagado  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Windows Forms

Posted 25 July 2009 - 03:42 PM

And about your other question, interrupt handling like in assembler or c isn't possible as far as I know. Also C isn't actually dead, it's still taught at my university for people who are learning embedded systems. C++ has it's specific uses as well, and C# is great fun if you don't need to do low level stuff. You really can whip up an application in no time. Try it, am sure you'll see the benefits(and it's drawbacks)
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#9 przemass  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Windows Forms

Posted 25 July 2009 - 03:44 PM

Using Windows Forms make common problems more simpler, but if you want to do sth unusual then your experience with WM_, HWND, WndProc and sth like that will be very helpful.
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#10 RudiVisser  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Windows Forms

Posted 25 July 2009 - 03:46 PM

View Postrgoodwin6, on 25 Jul, 2009 - 02:24 PM, said:

Don't take it the wrong way. I'm just trying to learn something. I've been writing code in C since the late 70's and I'm tyring to figure out how to migrate to C# (since C is pretty much obsolete). The thing is that the only sample code I've seen in C# uses these Windows forms and they are all trivial examples. If you are writing 1000+ lines of code, why break the flow by going to these point and click dialog box interfaces? There must be function calls that do the same thing. They didn't do away with interrupt handling functions, did they?

I suppose that more to the point of what I am trying to find out is where can I see a non trivial sample of a complex program in C#? That's what I want to begin to understand.

Sorry, I didn't take it the wrong way :)

Creating a GUI Application using Windows Forms is just the same as, erm, for example, using Win32 API Calls to produce a window.

It's basically just an easier way of doing so, just because it's easy of course, doesn't mean that they can't be used in complex applications :) You have the option of drawing your own controls that can be derived from the standard Windows Forms controls, so you can make pretty much whatever you like in addition to the standard controls.

Using Windows Forms, in my opinion, doesn't break the flow of programming, if anything it simply assists development :) You don't have to use the Windows Forms Designer to make the forms, after all that's just a Visual Studio feature to assist development yet again. You could of course just design a form virtually through notepad or the code view, if you like positioning things for yourself! :D

EDIT: You don't get raw OS interrupts like in low level languages, but that primarily comes from the managed side of things, not Windows Forms. You can use WndProc to process raw Windows Messages as they happen, however.

This post has been edited by MageUK: 25 July 2009 - 04:13 PM

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#11 rgoodwin6  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Windows Forms

Posted 25 July 2009 - 04:02 PM

View PostMageUK, on 25 Jul, 2009 - 02:46 PM, said:

View Postrgoodwin6, on 25 Jul, 2009 - 02:24 PM, said:

Don't take it the wrong way. I'm just trying to learn something. I've been writing code in C since the late 70's and I'm tyring to figure out how to migrate to C# (since C is pretty much obsolete). The thing is that the only sample code I've seen in C# uses these Windows forms and they are all trivial examples. If you are writing 1000+ lines of code, why break the flow by going to these point and click dialog box interfaces? There must be function calls that do the same thing. They didn't do away with interrupt handling functions, did they?

I suppose that more to the point of what I am trying to find out is where can I see a non trivial sample of a complex program in C#? That's what I want to begin to understand.

Sorry, I didn't take it the wrong way :)

Creating a GUI Application using Windows Forms is just the same as, erm, for example, using Win32 API Calls to produce a window.

It's basically just an easier way of doing so, just because it's easy of course, doesn't mean that they can't be used in complex applications :) You have the option of drawing your own controls that can be derived from the standard Windows Forms controls, so you can make pretty much whatever you like in addition to the standard controls.

Using Windows Forms, in my opinion, doesn't break the flow of programming, if anything it simply assists development :) You don't have to use the Windows Forms Designer to make the forms, after all that's just a Visual Studio feature to assist development yet again. You could of course just design a form virtually through notepad or the code view, if you like positioning things for yourself! :D

EDIT: You don't get raw OS interrupts like in low level languages, but that primarily comes from the managed side of things, not Windows Forms. You can use Windows to process raw Windows Messages as they happen, however.


***
Embedded Systems is where I spent most of my time over the last 30 years, but it seems that most of my skills are obsolete. When I began coding Microsoft did not exist and Intel had just introduced their second microprocessor to the marketplace. CPM was the only operating system around. I wrote code that started with the power on interrupt signal, all of it in Intel assembler. The product was instrumentation for plating thickness measurements. Anyway, enough of that.

My thanks to all for the information. I have already started reviewing the C# tutorials and have found several to be very interesting and informative. I think I have found the correct site to bring myself up to date.

Thanks,
Bob
***
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#12 SixOfEleven  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Windows Forms

Posted 25 July 2009 - 04:37 PM

View Postrgoodwin6, on 25 Jul, 2009 - 05:02 PM, said:

***
Embedded Systems is where I spent most of my time over the last 30 years, but it seems that most of my skills are obsolete. When I began coding Microsoft did not exist and Intel had just introduced their second microprocessor to the marketplace. CPM was the only operating system around. I wrote code that started with the power on interrupt signal, all of it in Intel assembler. The product was instrumentation for plating thickness measurements. Anyway, enough of that.

My thanks to all for the information. I have already started reviewing the C# tutorials and have found several to be very interesting and informative. I think I have found the correct site to bring myself up to date.

Thanks,
Bob
***


Hi Bob,

You said that you programmed in C. Did you make the jump from C to C++? Having a good understanding of object-oriented programming will help you in your quest to learn C#. You do not have to just create Windows Forms applications with C#. You can learn quite a lot creating Console applications as well. They would probably be easier for you to get started with because you are used to embedded systems where you have control. GUI programming, Windows Forms, is responding to what the user wants to do, Event Driven Programming. In Console you decide the flow of the program. You would call your functions (usually called methods in OOP) at the times you need to.

I think you will find this an excellent community for help with learning programming and web development. If you haven't already I would suggest posting an introduction in the Introduce Yourself forum. Many here are willing to help as best they can.
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#13 rgoodwin6  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Windows Forms

Posted 25 July 2009 - 04:53 PM

View PostSixOfEleven, on 25 Jul, 2009 - 03:37 PM, said:

View Postrgoodwin6, on 25 Jul, 2009 - 05:02 PM, said:

***
Embedded Systems is where I spent most of my time over the last 30 years, but it seems that most of my skills are obsolete. When I began coding Microsoft did not exist and Intel had just introduced their second microprocessor to the marketplace. CPM was the only operating system around. I wrote code that started with the power on interrupt signal, all of it in Intel assembler. The product was instrumentation for plating thickness measurements. Anyway, enough of that.

My thanks to all for the information. I have already started reviewing the C# tutorials and have found several to be very interesting and informative. I think I have found the correct site to bring myself up to date.

Thanks,
Bob
***


Hi Bob,

You said that you programmed in C. Did you make the jump from C to C++? Having a good understanding of object-oriented programming will help you in your quest to learn C#. You do not have to just create Windows Forms applications with C#. You can learn quite a lot creating Console applications as well. They would probably be easier for you to get started with because you are used to embedded systems where you have control. GUI programming, Windows Forms, is responding to what the user wants to do, Event Driven Programming. In Console you decide the flow of the program. You would call your functions (usually called methods in OOP) at the times you need to.

I think you will find this an excellent community for help with learning programming and web development. If you haven't already I would suggest posting an introduction in the Introduce Yourself forum. Many here are willing to help as best they can.


I'm afraid I did not take the leap into C++. When it was first introduced the executables used way too much memory to be acceptable for embedded systems. I did take a few classes and got to understand how to write C code so that it was somewhat object oriented. That gave me some education on the subject. I also gained some understanding of the inheiritence and overloading, but I never implemented those into my own C code. I think I know enough OOP topics to be dangerous, so I'll have to re-learn as I go.

I agree that D.I.C. seems to be a good community. I am a bit embarrassed to admit I could not locate the control for introducing myself. I set the pulldown menu to introduction and clicked on GO, but I did not se a dialog box to enter my introduction text. If you think you can point that out to me I would be happy to introduce myself.

Also, could you tell me about the "[/quote]" that I see in the other messages?

Thanks - Bob
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#14 SixOfEleven  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Windows Forms

Posted 25 July 2009 - 05:05 PM

This site uses BBCode for the forum messages. When you are posting a message you will see light gret writing where you are writing your text. You will see:

Post Your Code Like This:
[ code]code here[ /code]

Those are tags that have specific functions. The tags you mentioned:

[ quote] and [ /quote] are used to quote text. Everything between those tags will be in the quote box that you see. Now the post you made above doesn't show the proper quote text because there was an unbalanced tag. You can think of them like { and } in a C program. Everything inside the tags would be like the statements in a function between the { and }. The reason the tags I used will not display the quote and code text is because I purposely put a space between the bracket and the first letter.

You can click on this link to get to the introduce yourself forum:

http://www.dreaminco...showforum65.htm

All you will have to do there is click the orange New Topic button to post your introduction.

Welcome aboard and have a great stay!
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#15 Renagado  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Windows Forms

Posted 25 July 2009 - 05:18 PM

Indeed welcome aboard, I greatly appreciate the skills of an "oldschool" programmer, since I've tried my hand at assembler as well, and it really is an art to understand that. Also I can imagine the jump you need to make to go from c to an OOP language, but that goes for all of us. Some of the OOP concepts are just very abstract and only make sense after using them a while. So take your time, and if you're stuck, people here will be happy to guide you.
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