My "suck a fat one" letter to the FCC

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#1 NeoTifa  Icon User is online

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My "suck a fat one" letter to the FCC

Posted 26 October 2009 - 10:15 AM

I don't know if this should go to Student Campus instead, but I thought you'd might be interested in reading this and maybe give your opinions. This was an assignment. ((All my apostraphes and quotes are gone :())


[My Address Block]

26 October, 2009

[Their Address Block]

Dear Mr. Julius Genachowski, Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission:

My name is Erica Boyer, a humble gamer who hopes to one day become successful in the career of game programming, want to thank you for spending your precious little time to read this letter. I know that you are a busy man, so I am not going to take too much time explaining my request. As a Harvard graduate lawyer, I am sure that you can understand, and have endured many trials on, the issue with the first amendment, and how regulating media can be considered taking away those rights. Also, as a married man you can understand the issue with regulating the content that appears in today’s media. Being a part of both sides, I am sure you see things clearly from both standpoints and will give my opinion an honest contemplation. What I ask for is for you to maybe consider making the regulations slightly less strict, especially when it comes to video games.

The long standing debate on whether or not video games cause violence in today’s youth have some very good, convincing points from both sides of the issue. I have done my research on this controversy and will state a few points. First of all, yes, it is evident that video games do raise the aggressive brain function in a player, but the same research has also stated that the deviation from before the gamer tested played a violent game to after said gamer played the violent game was not significant enough to directly cause any aggressive actions. Second, it has also been proven that video games affect people differently. Violent games make violent people more violent, calms the introverted, and do not really affect the majority of the population. Thirdly, we can agree that there are various games for various age groups, and maybe making stronger regulations on who has access to those games might help prevent eight-year-olds from playing games like Grand Theft Auto. A parent should know how their kids are, and if they are particularly volatile and aggressive at home, a violent game is the last type they should buy for them.

As I mentioned above, the main issue at hand is not so much the content of the games, but the access. Parents letting their toddlers play games where you run around killing people is not the game producers fault, and should not be punished for it. I’m sure you’ve heard about the recent ban of the zombie apocalypse game Left 4 Dead 2 in Australia. Being the reasonable man that you are, I am quite sure we would never come to such drastic precautions, but I was disappointed in finding out that your department demanded Valve to change the cover of the game to add more fingers to the half decayed zombie hand. Everybody, including children, knows that zombies are dead, half decayed beings rising from the graves. Considering the timeline of the events in the game, the bodies should be more decayed than that, and Valve did a good job censoring it themselves, but to make them go from three missing fingers to only one is sort of ridiculous. The argument that “children can see them on the shelves” is silly because if the parents were keeping a better handle on their children to make sure they’re not running off and looking at potentially “questionable” content, we would not have this problem.

Parenting is a very hard responsibility, and one cannot watch their kids 24/7, but actually sitting down like a relatively responsible parent and talking to their kids about gun control and crime would make a world of difference when the children are exposed to the violence presented in some games. After all, we see the same thing in the news day after day, but they do not censor that. To make a game believable, the makers have to put a certain element of realism in it, which causes the player to be more absorbed into it. Gaming is a several billion dollar industry, and if a game is so censored that it is not believable, no one will play them anymore, possibly causing a slight decline in the economy. Also, there are plenty of books with very descriptive sex scenes that a child could pick up and read, so trying to censor everything would be a pointless, endless struggle. Your policy on censoring on the radio and CD’s are reasonable, I think, but movies and video games are just like interactive books, which I hardly ever hear of being censored, and would take out all the creativity, vocabulary, and imagination right out of it. I am sure that our imaginations could come up with more lurid, provocative, and disgusting things than anything an author, director, or game maker would ever think about putting in their media, but luckily our imaginations can’t be censored.

Thank you for taking the time to read my letter, and as I mentioned earlier, this is just my compressed opinion of this controversy, and you do not have to abide by it, but I do ask that you consider my opinion as a valid voice of the gaming community.





Sincerely,
Erica Boyer
Erica Boyer

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#2 KYA  Icon User is offline

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Re: My "suck a fat one" letter to the FCC

Posted 26 October 2009 - 10:20 AM

What is the purpose of this?

It's not very professional.
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Re: My "suck a fat one" letter to the FCC

Posted 26 October 2009 - 10:21 AM

Yay! Way to go NeoTifa! However, I think that for it to reach the office of of that high executive, there needs to be a few more data evidence for it to be convincing. I do, however like your idea, and have read the essay that you previously wrote which was also good. Perhaps if you included that as well...?

This post has been edited by Dogstopper: 26 October 2009 - 10:23 AM

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Re: My "suck a fat one" letter to the FCC

Posted 26 October 2009 - 11:05 AM

Considering that I'm not actually planning on sending it.... :P It's a rough draft and just rushed through it so I can turn it in on time-ish. Forgot about it over the weekend lol. It's supposed to be a short, opinionated paper, and would doubt that Mr. Genachowski would read nor appreciate a bibliography accompanying this letter had I actually sent it. Lol.


KYA said:

What is the purpose of this?


Me said:

This was an assignment.

This post has been edited by NeoTifa: 26 October 2009 - 11:06 AM

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Re: My "suck a fat one" letter to the FCC

Posted 26 October 2009 - 11:38 AM

View PostNeoTifa, on 26 Oct, 2009 - 09:45 PM, said:

Sincerely,
Erica Boyer
Erica Boyer


For creating more impact on the reader, right? ;)
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Re: My "suck a fat one" letter to the FCC

Posted 26 October 2009 - 11:42 AM

In the MSWord document the first time the name shows up is in Frenchscript. Like a signature.
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Re: My "suck a fat one" letter to the FCC

Posted 26 October 2009 - 11:56 AM

i like it Erica, but polish it a bit. :)
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Re: My "suck a fat one" letter to the FCC

Posted 26 October 2009 - 11:58 AM

But how you do feel about the issue was the topic. :/
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Re: My "suck a fat one" letter to the FCC

Posted 26 October 2009 - 12:07 PM

I get it, it's for an assignment, so why would you write it like you're talking to your homie?

There is a gross lack of citations. You also make assertive statements that you don't have any personal experience in (like "Parenting is a very hard responsibility...").

Don't use the word "very", use a thesaurus and come up with a stronger synonym.

Overall, I would not have guessed that this was written by a college student.
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Re: My "suck a fat one" letter to the FCC

Posted 26 October 2009 - 12:26 PM

:P Thanks for your input.
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Re: My "suck a fat one" letter to the FCC

Posted 26 October 2009 - 12:42 PM

Polish the writing & add some citations. Otherwise, the content itself looks pretty good. Very interesting topic, btw.
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Re: My "suck a fat one" letter to the FCC

Posted 26 October 2009 - 01:00 PM

Thanks. I've always had a good eye for composition (art, music, and writing), it's just execution that gets me :P

I guess I'm confused about the assignment, because I was under the impression that there shouldn't be like a bunch of citations and stuff. I don't know. I'll have to ask weds.
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Re: My "suck a fat one" letter to the FCC

Posted 04 November 2009 - 11:48 PM

:^:

Related, see my caffeine lounge topic on a cut-down L4D2 for AUS. :)
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Re: My "suck a fat one" letter to the FCC

Posted 15 November 2009 - 03:21 PM

Posted Image

I also updated my essays. Here's all 3 XD

Information Report- an unbiased report of info and shit.

Erica Boyer
C. Holmes
ENG 102-01
27 September, 2009
Video Games and Violence: Is There a Connection?
Many parents and others have become skeptical of video games, saying that they cause violence and antisocialism in young adolescents. Games like Grand Theft Auto, Doom, and Quake, which are rated M for mature, have all been criticized by several news stations and/or websites for their violent/suggestive content. But do they really cause it, or are they just an addition to the equation that ends up equaling in violence? This was a question in my mind when I decided on this topic, so I explored all the points and views that I could think of on this topic.
There are many variables that go into the equation, such as social life, psychological issues, and parenting. Several of the articles I have read, such as “Playing the Blame Game” by Smith and "The effect of playing violent video games on adolescents: Should parents be quaking in their boots?." By Unsworth, Gabrielle, Grant J. Devilly, and Tony Ward, shared that they have indeed proved that video games effect different people differently; aggressive people tend to be more aggressive, relieved the mellow people, but the majority have no effect. (Smith; Unsworth, Devilly, and Ward.) There is also Art Carden’s article that argues that video games could alleviate violence the same way that pornography reduces sexual crimes. (2) With video games being an 18.85 billion dollar industry (Smith), could they really be affecting children/adolescents that negatively?


On the other hand, video games have been proven to raise the aggressive brain waves, which cause the player to feel slightly hostile and aggressive. (Bartlett, Unsworth, Devilly, and Ward) According to Bartlett, Harris, and Baldassaro’s study of video games’ relation to violence suggests that the cognitive brain functions associate blood, weapons, and competition with violence, and the factor of frustration plays heavily on increasing the aggressiveness of a gamer. “The findings from this study suggest that playing this violent video game does increase aggression, compared with baseline. Additionally, aggression was higher for those who played the video game with the interactive light gun, lending support to the Weapons Effect.” (Bartlett)
Another argument that concerned parents raise is the issue of children becoming more antisocial with the sophistication of media and video game systems. More and more games these days bring on a level of interaction with other players you are playing with, such as World of Warcraft, Left 4 Dead, and Team Fortress 2. In Jeremy Adam Smith’s article, “Playing the Blame Game”, he states “For boys especially, they found that today video games are a way to socialize and connect with their friends, …” (Smith) I personally see this as a valid point because I honestly do too. Also, Cardin suggests “And instead of siphoning time away from sports and outdoor activities, Olsen and Kutner discovered that boys who played sports video games were actually much more likely to play those games in real life.” (Smith)
Not all video games are interactive with real people, though, and thus could lead to a slight increase of antisocialism. It’s true that a video game’s addictiveness does in fact decrease the time spent reading and doing homework (Smith), but most children and adolescents who are antisocial were probably already antisocial. Most incidents where kids have brought their anger out on other people where already disturbed and suffered from a number of social issues and had given clues by speaking out or posting their opinions online, such as the Columbine shooters and several other imitators. (Carden, Larkin) There has also been proof that those boys have also used a Doom map editor to create their school and run through their scenario in their planning. (Carden, Larkin)
Seeing these views, it seems evident that violent video games indeed increase aggressive functions in the brain, but the amount that they do is not large enough to directly cause a violent attack. There may be several other factors, such as bullying, family problems, or relationship issues which could increase the aggressiveness of a gamer, but the games are just a minor factor in that equation that leads to violence. As shown, they also have the potential to increase social interaction, and have found that non-violent games like sports games can increase physical activities. With this in mind, we can now get a clear view of video games and how they do not directly cause violence and isolation.





Works Cited
Barlett, Christopher P., Richard J. Harris, and Ross Baldassaro. "Longer you play, the more hostile
you feel: examination of first person shooter video games and aggression during video game
play." Aggressive behavior 33.6 (2007), 486 - 497. (1)
Carden, Art. “Video Games and Violence.” Ludwig von Mises Institute. 10 Aug, 2009.
<http://mises.org/story.3528>. (2)
Larkin, Ralph W. "The Columbine Legacy." American behavioral Scientist 52.9 (2009), 1309-
1326. (3)
Smith, Jeremy Adam. "PLAYING THE BLAME GAME." Greater Good 4.4 (Spring2008 2008):
24-27. SocINDEX with Full Text. EBSCO. Wright State University Library, Dayton,
OH. 20 Sep. 2009 <http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.libraries.wright.edu:2048/
login.aspx?direct=true&db=sih&AN=37583331&site=ehost-live>. (4)
Unsworth, Gabrielle, Grant J. Devilly, and Tony Ward. "The effect of playing violent video
games on adolescents: Should parents be quaking in their boots?." Psychology, Crime &
Law 13.4 (Aug. 2007): 383-394. SocINDEX with Full Text. EBSCO. Wright State
University Library, Dayton, OH. 20 Sep. 2009 <http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.
libraries.wright.edu:2048/login.aspx?direct=true&db=sih&AN=25727489&site=ehost-
live>. (5)



Argumentative Essay- yea, self explanitory

Erica Boyer
C. Holmes
ENG 102-01
21 October, 2009
Video Games: Leader of Violence, or Just the Right-Hand Man?
For decades there has been a controversy on whether or not media causes violent behavior, and no one has really seemed to come up with a clear answer. With the increased interactivity of the media, they seem to capture the minds of children and adults alike, and as the technology gets more sophisticated, the more entrancing these interactive stories become. The most current argument on the media-causing-violence issue has been about how video games cause violence actions in children in young adults due to their realistic graphics, interactivity, violent game play, suggestive cut scenes, etc. But are video games by themselves causing the violence, or is it just an added variable in the equation that equals youth violence? I am going to show how video games do not actually cause violence, and that there are several other factors that actually induce the violence.
According to Christopher Bartlett, Richard Harris, and Ross Baldassaro’s article in Aggressive behavior magazine, scientists have set out to study the effect of video games on a youth’s school activities and their aggression levels since the 1980’s. As their article states, titled “Longer You Play, the More Hostile You Feel: Examination of First Person Shooter Video Games and Aggression During Video Game Play”, the research dates that far back and “showed positive correlations between the amounts of self-reported time spent in video game arcades and teachers, parent, and peer ratings of aggressive play, disrupted school performance, and the delinquency of these children [Lin and Lepper, 1987; Nelson and Carlson, 1985].” (Bartlett et al.). In this study that I quoted, they did indeed find that “those who played a violent video game showed more aggressive behaviors” (Bartlett et al.).
Gabrielle Unsworth, Grant Devilly, and Tony Ward agree with Bartlett, Harris, and Baldassaro’s article that video games have been proven to raise the aggressive brain waves, which cause the player to feel slightly hostile and aggressive. According to Bartlett, Harris, and Baldassaro’s study of video games’ relation to violence, data suggests that the cognitive brain functions associate blood, weapons, and competition with violence, and the factor of frustration plays heavily on increasing the aggressiveness of a gamer. “The findings from this study suggest that playing this violent video game does increase aggression, compared with baseline. Additionally, aggression was higher for those who played the video game with the interactive light gun, lending support to the Weapons Effect” (Bartlett et al.).
In another study done, “Do Aggressive People Play Violent Computer Games in a More Aggressive Way? Individual Difference and Idiosyncratic Game-Playing Experience” by Peng, Liu, and Mou, evidence shows that short term aggression is consistently found to be a side effect to playing violent games. It also seems that extended exposure to violent video games cause increased aggression in personality as well (Unsworth et al.). More interestingly yet, the main shooter from the Columbine killings used a map editor from the game “Doom” to simulate the shootings before they happened (Larkin; Smith; Carden).
I personally have played games all of my life and know that there are a variety of games that show a lot of violence. There are games like Street Fighter, Tekken, Mortal Kombat, and Soul Calibur that are just fighting period. Other games like Grand Theft Auto seem to glorify the life of a “gangster” in the streets of various big cities, and the missions in the game include stealing cars, transporting criminals, and other illegal acts. That game also give the option of killing innocent bystanders and hookers, but with the hookers you “sleep with them” first then steal their money and kill them. Even racing games like Need For Speed encourage running from the cops and racing through cities without regards to innocent bystanders or laws.
With all this evidence that states that video games are a bad influence and have been linked to delinquency, one would probably be saying to themselves “well, Hell! These games are evil! Let’s ban them!” These evil devices obviously increase aggression and inspire violence, so the 18.85 billion dollar industry (Smith) should be put to an end, right? But if they would take a closer look, or consider another perspective, one would see that the myths debunk themselves! Most youths who act violently are already suffering from social and/or psychological issues, IQ (Kronenberger et al.), and in the case of the Columbine shooter, he just used a video game as a tool, not as a main inspiration.
Every single video game is different, and is in a different perspective. They range from sports to fitness to violent to horror. In some games you are the bad guy, and other games you are the good guy. The effects of these games are as different as the people playing them and equally as different as the reasons said people are playing them. According to Jeremy Adam Smith in reference to the game “Quake II”, “They found that playing the game made hostile people angrier, helped calm more introverted personalities, and had no apparent affect on people with mild and stable personalities. In other words, one kid might indeed play the game to blow off steam in a healthy way, even as it feds another’s anger” (Smith).
Another interesting view is from Art Carden, saying that “Regulations that restrict access to pornography, for example, may actually increase the social problems they are intended to correct. Regulations restricting access to violent video games could do the same.” In a graph in Oxfords article on Kombo.com, it clearly states that the FBI’s annual crime rates have reduced. The article also states that while the crime rates have reduced, video game sales have increased (Oxford). Coincidence, or is this linked?
As I argued earlier, everybody is made differently, and thus reacts to situations differently. Social issues also affect how a person’s personality is molded. Being bullied is a big factor when it comes to social and psychological issues, and I can personally say that being made fun of in school leads to feelings of resentment and depression. As with the Columbine shootings and many other imitation shootings, bullying seemed to be the main reason these kids wanted to hurt other kids (Larkin). They posted web groups that preached hatred towards “jocks” and talked about how they wanted them dead and how they were going to do it (Larkin).
The lack of parental attention is also another factor. I see lots of parents these days using the television and video games to babysit their kids. Little kids are very impressionable and tend to copy things to learn, and if the parents are at work or doing other things and just leave their children in front of the media, the children are bound to click on or play a violent game that they might imitate. Plus the lack of attention could also lead to resentment and aggression.
As mentioned earlier, yet on a side note, not all games are violent, and even violent games are not all bad. My personal favorite games right now are Left 4 Dead and Team Fortress 2, and they are very violent and show blood squirting out and dismembered body parts flying. The manner of the games, though, are not such that encourage violence in everyday life, though, as Left 4 Dead is about a team of 4 survivors of a zombie apocalypse trying to find and escape, and Team Fortress 2 being a kind of arena type game that has a variety of game play types, such as capture the point or stealing intelligence. How can you survive a zombie apocalypse without shooting them? Also, seeing as it belongs in the horror genre, the graphicness of the decomposing zombies is just to make it scarier. Same goes for the zombie classic Resident Evil. No t all games were intended to glorify violence, and sometimes the blood and gore is necessary for genre purposes.
Seeing both sides of the issue, one could agree with me that video games do not cause violence directly. There are many other factors, such as previous psychological and social issues, and the levels of aggression caused by games are insufficient and miniscule (Bartlett et al.; Peng et al.). Even though violent games have been proven to raise aggressive brain functions, they alone are not enough to cause people to act violently as “millions of kids and adults play video games every day without ever engaging in any violent behavior” (Smith; Bartlett et al.; Kronenberger). Usually children who commit acts of violence are violent already, and the games they play just might add enough aggression to push them over the brink, but they are not the main cause of the youth violence.





Works Cited
Anderson, Craig A. “Violent Video Games: Myths Facts, and Unanswered Questions.” APA
Online. Vol. 16: No. 5. (Oct. 2003). <http://www.apa.org/science/psa/sb-anderson.html>.
Barlett, Christopher P., Richard J. Harris, and Ross Baldassaro. "Longer you play, the more
hostile you feel: examination of first person shooter video games and aggression during
video game play." Aggressive behavior 33.6 (2007), 486 - 497.
Ferguson, Christopher J., et al. "Violent Video Games and Aggression: Causal Relationship or
Byproduct of Family Violence and Intrinsic Violence Motivation?." Criminal Justice and
behavior 35.3 (2008), 311-332.
Kronenberger, William G., et al. "Media violence exposure in aggressive and control
adolescents: differences in self- and parent-reported exposure to violence on television
and in video games." Aggressive behavior 31.3 (2005), 201 - 216.
Larkin, Ralph W. "The Columbine Legacy." American behavioral Scientist 52.9 (2009), 1309-
1326.
Oxford, Davis. “Studies: Crime Drops as Games Sales Rise, Youth Violence Not Linked to
Games.” Kombo.com (Sep. 2009). <http://www.kombo.com/article.php?artid=13609>.
Peng, Wei, Ming Liu, and Yi Mou. "Do aggressive people play violent computer games in a
more aggressive way? Individual difference and idiosyncratic game-playing experience."
CyberPsychology & behavior 11.2 (2008): 157-61.
Smith, Jeremy Adam. "PLAYING THE BLAME GAME." Greater Good 4.4 (Spring2008 2008):
24-27. SocINDEX with Full Text. EBSCO. Wright State University Library, Dayton,
OH. 20 Sep. 2009 <http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.libraries.wright.edu:2048/
login.aspx?direct=true&db=sih&AN=37583331&site=ehost-live>.


Unsworth, Gabrielle, Grant J. Devilly, and Tony Ward. "The effect of playing violent video
games on adolescents: Should parents be quaking in their boots?." Psychology, Crime &
Law 13.4 (Aug. 2007): 383-394. SocINDEX with Full Text. EBSCO. Wright State
University Library, Dayton,OH. 20 Sep. 2009 <http://search.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.
libraries.wright.edu:2048/login.aspx?direct=true&db=sih&AN=25727489&site=ehost-
live>.
Wallenius, Marjut, Raija-Leena Punamäki, and Arja Rimpelä. "Digital Game Playing and Direct
and Indirect Aggression in Early Adolescence: The Roles of Age, Social Intelligence, and
Parent-Child Communication." Journal of Youth and Adolescence 36.3 (2007), 325 –
336.








And last but not least, the Proposal Letter

[My Address Block]

26 October, 2009

[Their Address Block]

Dear Mr. Julius Genachowski, Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission:

My name is Erica Boyer, a humble gamer who hopes to one day become successful in the career of game programming, want to thank you for spending your precious little time to read this letter. I know that you are a busy man, so I am not going to take too much time explaining my request. As a Harvard graduate lawyer, I am sure that you can understand, and have endured many trials on, the issue with the first amendment, and how regulating media can be considered taking away those rights. Also, as a married man you can understand the issue with regulating the content that appears in today’s media. Being a part of both sides, I am sure you see things clearly from both standpoints and will give my opinion an honest contemplation. What I ask for is for you to consider making the regulations slightly less strict, especially when it comes to video games.

The long standing debate on whether or not video games cause violence in today’s youth have some very good, convincing points from both sides of the issue. First of all, yes, it is evident that video games do raise the aggressive brain function in a player, as stated in different articles by Christopher Bartlett, Richard Harris, and Ross Baldassaro and Gabrielle Unsworth, Grant DeVilly, and Tony Ward, but the same research has also stated that the deviation from before the gamer tested played a violent game to after said gamer played the violent game was not significant enough to directly cause any aggressive actions. Second, it has also been proven by them that video games affect people differently. Violent games make violent people more violent, calms the introverted, and do not really affect the majority of the population. Thirdly, we can agree that there are various games for various age groups, and maybe making stronger regulations on who has access to those games might help prevent eight-year-olds from playing games like Grand Theft Auto. A parent should know how their kids are, and if they are particularly volatile and aggressive at home, a violent game is the last type they should buy for them.

As I mentioned above, the main issue at hand is not so much the content of the games, but the access. Parents letting their toddlers play games where you run around killing people is not the game producers fault, and should not be punished for it. I’m sure you’ve heard about the recent ban of the zombie apocalypse game Left 4 Dead 2 in Australia. Being the reasonable man that you are, I am quite sure we would never come to such drastic precautions, but I was disappointed in finding out that your department demanded Valve to change the cover of the game to add more fingers to the half decayed zombie hand. Everybody, including children, knows that zombies are dead, half decayed beings rising from the graves. Considering the timeline of the events in the game, the bodies should be more decayed than that, and Valve did a good job censoring it themselves, but to make them go from three missing fingers to only one is sort of ridiculous. The argument that “children can see them on the shelves” is silly because if the parents were keeping a better handle on their children to make sure they’re not running off and looking at potentially “questionable” content, we would not have this problem.

Parenting is a very hard responsibility, and one cannot watch their kids 24/7, but actually sitting down like a relatively responsible parent and talking to their kids about gun control and crime would make a world of difference when the children are exposed to the violence presented in some games. After all, we see the same thing in the news day after day, but they do not censor that. To make a game believable, the makers have to put a certain element of realism in it, which causes the player to be more absorbed into it. Gaming is a several billion dollar industry, and if a game is so censored that it is not believable, no one will play them anymore, possibly causing a slight decline in the economy. Also, there are plenty of books with very descriptive sex scenes that a child could pick up and read, so trying to censor everything would be a pointless, endless struggle. Your policy on censoring on the radio and CD’s are reasonable, I think, but movies and video games are just like interactive books, which I hardly ever hear of being censored, and would take out all the creativity, vocabulary, and imagination right out of it. I am sure that our imaginations could come up with more lurid, provocative, and disgusting things than anything an author, director, or game maker would ever think about putting in their media, but luckily our imaginations can’t be censored.

Thank you for taking the time to read my letter. As I mentioned earlier, this is just my compressed opinion of this controversy, and you do not have to abide by it, but I do ask that you consider my opinion as a valid voice of the gaming community.





Sincerely,
Erica Boyer
Erica Boyer
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#15 hawkysu  Icon User is offline

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Re: My "suck a fat one" letter to the FCC

Posted 16 November 2009 - 12:30 AM

English makes my head spin. :/
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