Cell Phone Privacy

Who's Listening

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3 Replies - 1164 Views - Last Post: 16 December 2009 - 05:26 PM

#1 P4L  Icon User is offline

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Cell Phone Privacy

Posted 16 December 2009 - 11:35 AM

As techs, we all know that there are many hackers, crackers, and script-kiddies that try to get information from our computers, but what about our pdas, blackberrys, IPhones, etc. Are they after them? The simple answer is YES. In a recent newletter that I received from a company called 'DocuCrunch', they went into what is going on with company owned smartphones. Below is the article, as well as several links that they provided.

Quote

In recent years, cell phones (including iPhone and Blackberries) have become as big a business tool as the laptop and the copier, but such devices are even more vulnerable to industrial espionage.

A recent UK survey of companies and institutions revealed that 79% of employees conduct confidential conversations by cell phone, and 51% do so on a daily basis. However, only 18% had security software in place.

Even businesses that carefully encrypt emails and build secure server architectures may be unaware of the issue. Most people are used to making calls from standard, wired telephone, where security is not that big an issue (unless the police or the FBI are wiretapping you). But cell phone signals can be picked up far more easily.

Yes , the phone service companies provide some encryption with their services. But it highly vulnerable. In fact, this summer, German hackers announced they had managed to crack the encryption of mobile calls using GSM, a standard that makes up 80% of the world’s cell phone calls. Furthermore, their code logic will be released to hackers in the near future.

What this means for your business is that such critical details as sales discounts, planned bids and sales leads, subjects often discussed via cell phone, might fall into your rivals or your potential customers.

You may want to take a look at the growing number of hardware and software products that are being developed to give users a higher, harder-to-break level of encryption. These include companies like:

CallCrypt –http://www.cellcrypt.com/
Snapcom — http://www.snapshiel...p?cat=101&id=37 SecurStar –http://www.securstar..._phonecrypt.php


Here is the link the the actual article.

Enjoy

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#2 NeoTifa  Icon User is online

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Re: Cell Phone Privacy

Posted 16 December 2009 - 01:36 PM

Hmmm.... I think it's a good thing. It makes us more aware of the risks at hand. I read an article somewhere on maximumpc about a Dutch (?) guy holding peoples iphones hostage and stuff. Let me find that...

Here it is

Another interesting article

This post has been edited by NeoTifa: 16 December 2009 - 01:41 PM

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#3 P4L  Icon User is offline

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Re: Cell Phone Privacy

Posted 16 December 2009 - 01:54 PM

Well, this company Docu-Crunch has a lot of very interesting articles. Another was about a guys office phone that was hacked, and all the incoming calls forwarded to a remote computer that would spam the caller. I'll have to get the link to it later though.

It's just amazes me at what lengths people will go to in order to disrupt our lives.
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#4 macosxnerd101  Icon User is online

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Re: Cell Phone Privacy

Posted 16 December 2009 - 05:26 PM

My cell phone actually got hacked once. The summer before my freshman year of HS, I got my first cell phone (paying for the phone and service myself). So I got a texting plan and I was on the mobile IM a fair amount, with only 20 budies on my buddy list and 3-4 of them on at most. So in other words, 250 IMs a month on the phone would have been a lot. So one month, the bill came in and I was being charged $120 in excess IMs (coming out to about 2500 IMs or so). So we call up Verizon, and they ask us to go into one of their stores to have my phone examined. We do and they find no evidence of hacking, but we learn that the mobile IM server is completely unsecure. WTF?!! But I convinced the people there of my fiscal responsibility and the unlikliness of me sending/recieving 2500 IMs, so they talked to customer service on my behalf and the bill was cut in half to $60, which I ended up eating. It sucked ass, but I didn't touch the Mobile IM afterwards. Even if that didn't happen to me and I just heard from Verizon that their IM server was unsecured, I would have stopped using it.

This post has been edited by macosxnerd101: 16 December 2009 - 05:29 PM

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