Is VB.Net really that bad?

The endless VB.Net discussion

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49 Replies - 22806 Views - Last Post: 10 April 2015 - 11:09 AM

#46 Asscotte  Icon User is offline

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Re: Is VB.Net really that bad?

Posted 04 March 2010 - 03:53 PM

Actually even though I am a VB programmer, I quite like the thought of having a langauge sluur between VB and C# because for one it means that you can have one common .net langauge base, other than silverlight and possibly WPF. This means that you can call on a .net programmer as just that rather than picking of minorities.

Though I it does make me wonder what such a langauge would be called? Or would Microsoft be boring and just call it .net?

Though any langauge like that would probally be a little to powerful, if not used right...
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#47 biggerB  Icon User is offline

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Re: Is VB.Net really that bad?

Posted 05 July 2010 - 11:26 AM

To all of you the thing is that there is nothing much that is possible in other languages but not VB. You could do almost everything with VB. The code does not come out to the user of the program, but the program itself does. The end user does not care about what language a program is made in he just cares if it works..
I...
I Personally believes that the language you use represents your personality. I have used C# and have even dipped my fingers into C++ and even java (No offense but i hated every minute of java). But the language that spoke to me was VB.net and if anyone else wants to use another language I really don't care. The thing is I program in vb.net and if anyone else has a problem with it, they can f**k themselves.
About the syntax change, yes i do agree that the syntax of VB.net is different from other languages and yes absolute beginners should not be directly introduced to it. I myself was introduced to VB (not .net) and had a hard time (and still do) working with C# code.

However all in all VB.net is a great language and as I have said before
if anyone else has a problem with it, they can f**k themselves.
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#48 techwriter13  Icon User is offline

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Re: Is VB.Net really that bad?

Posted 10 June 2014 - 12:19 AM

I was working at Microsoft when VB .NET was being developed. As a programming writer, I wrote a lot of VB .NET code. I had a lot of prior VB 6 experience (and 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, AND VB for DOS!) and I had no problems moving from VB 6 to VB .NET. Once I became familiar with .NET, I was able to write code in VB and convert it to C# on the fly.

VB .NET might not be the best language for beginners, although I'm not sure I agree with that, but it does have a few advantages. I still like the With statement and the ability to access the My namespace.

By the way, for what it's worth, my first language was BASIC on the TI-99/4A back in 1983.
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#49 Pishak  Icon User is offline

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Re: Is VB.Net really that bad?

Posted 28 October 2014 - 08:06 AM

Is it important to defame Visual Basic, that's the real question.

Think of it like this:

You own a ferrari and a lamborghini. Do you beat the ferrari with a stick and send it to the scrap yard, or do you polish it and keep it covered in your garage?

The point is that anyone who really needs to learn how to write code will get a real education(not from forum threads), and they will know the difference of the languages, so syntax differences won't mean anything.

All that all of these VB.net VS C# threads are is just a bunch of insecure programmers fighting over their favorite language, just looking for bs to make themselves feel or look better, and to me, that is what needs to be sent to the scrapyard.

It is a stupid, stupid, pointless topic.

Take care.
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#50 RoboThumb  Icon User is offline

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Re: Is VB.Net really that bad?

Posted 10 April 2015 - 11:09 AM

This is a very old post in addition to the VB.Net vs anything other language has been beat to death. However, I thought I could put some perspective on how and why VB is at least useful in my case. My background is in Civil and Systems Engineering with no formal programming training outside some basic stuff in Matlab.

  • I start off being savvy with Excel up to its limitations (LOONNG formula strings, user foul ups, loops, numerical methods, data structures)(Years!!!)
  • Moved to VBA to condense formulas. (2 yrs)
  • Furthered VBA to create GUI's and objects. My colleagues started to ask me to make programs for them.(2 yrs)
  • My VBA applications became far to complicated with absolutely no encapsulation or inheritance.
  • Skipped VB6 as it provided the exact same functionality as VBA. (0.5 yrs)
  • Now I'm 5 months deep in actually learning programming through LearnNowOnline using VB.Net.


My rationale was that I had to get up and running with minimal amount of headache. I already had to learn programming artifacts (now known) like interfaces, inheritance, delegates, lambda functions, LINQ, database logic and connections... Phew!!! I didn't want to use this time learning a new syntax. My thinking was that I'd grasp these concepts through the VB.net lens then pursue the more commercially viable languages (C#, Python, Java) as (I assume) the artifacts are relatively conserved as the syntax is a single major change (Any thoughts). I attribute this migration to the actual programming world (or even knowledge of it) directly to the easy access to the VBA IDE found in Excel.

I'm trying to migrate from VBA entirely, however there is still a great need to deploy excel addin applications at my job. I'm using Excel DNA to package VB.net dll's to deploy-able excel addins as our company has a very strict (and antiquated) computer usage policy.

At any rate, VBA, VB6, VB.Net, C# seems to be a natural evolution for someone who is self learning. Perhaps that's where VB.net actually shines as a programming language. Cheers to VB.Net as a great medium for self learners.

RoboThumb
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