Submit A Challenge

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107 Replies - 43343 Views - Last Post: 12 January 2011 - 11:35 AM

#61 Dogstopper  Icon User is offline

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Re: Submit A Challenge

Posted 15 February 2010 - 07:01 PM

Thanks, Raynes. I made some changes, and probably will keep making a few.
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#62 Raynes  Icon User is offline

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Re: Submit A Challenge

Posted 16 February 2010 - 05:27 AM

I'm not trying to nitpick, or be a smartass, but I've noticed one more flaw. The fact that Java is compiled to an intermediate bytecode before being interpreted is not actually unique to Java. AOT compilation is possible in almost all JVM languages including Clojure, Scala, JRUBY(?), and Ioke (in the future).
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#63 programble  Icon User is offline

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Re: Submit A Challenge

Posted 16 February 2010 - 05:46 PM

Not sure if this has already been submitted, since I'm not planning on reading all 4 pages of this.

I propose a CGI challenge. Members can submit any CGI scripts, in any language (Python, Perl, Ruby, BASH, etc). Lot's of cool things can be done in CGI, so I think this would be cool. A lot of languages have libraries for CGI, such as Python's cgi and cgitb modules.
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#64 erik.price  Icon User is offline

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Re: Submit A Challenge

Posted 16 February 2010 - 06:02 PM

View PostRaynes, on 16 February 2010 - 06:27 AM, said:

AOT compilation is possible in almost all JVM languages including Clojure, Scala, JRUBY(?)


Yep, there is a JRuby Compiler Project which allows you to compile JRuby to a .class format. (This actually greatly increases execution speed)

You could also directly write a class file with a hex editor, opcode list, and a lot of patience that would be executable with the JVM.
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#65 bcc32  Icon User is offline

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Re: Submit A Challenge

Posted 20 February 2010 - 12:18 PM

C# Windows Program

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CHALLENGE: Create a windows application using C#

C# (pronounced "see sharp") is a multi-paradigm programming language encompassing imperative, functional, generic, object-oriented (class-based), and component-oriented programming disciplines. It was developed by Microsoft within the .NET initiative and later approved as a standard by Ecma (ECMA-334) and ISO (ISO/IEC 23270). C# is one of the programming languages designed for the Common Language Infrastructure.

C# is intended to be a simple, modern, general-purpose, object-oriented programming language[6]. Its development team is led by Anders Hejlsberg. The most recent version is C# 3.0, which was released in conjunction with the .NET Framework 3.5 in 2007. The next proposed version, 4.0, is in development.


IDEAS:
  • Create a "run" dialog alternative
  • Create an MD5 hash calculator
  • Advanced - Recreate calc.exe using C#. NO REVERSE ENGINEERING, CHEATERS!


RESOURCES:
MSDN
DIC Forum

HOW TO GET STARTED:
Visit MSDN and read/watch some tutorials.
MSDN has all C# functions, so it should be sufficient
It's a good idea to use Visual C#, as it has a form designer built-in

This post has been edited by bcc32: 20 February 2010 - 12:19 PM

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#66 Raynes  Icon User is offline

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Re: Submit A Challenge

Posted 21 February 2010 - 03:43 AM

Why a Windows application? Why not make it cross-platform and let people use Mono on Linux? You're under generalizing what could be a popular challenge.
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#67 Shane Hudson  Icon User is offline

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Re: Submit A Challenge

Posted 21 February 2010 - 04:39 AM

View PostRaynes, on 21 February 2010 - 09:43 AM, said:

Why a Windows application? Why not make it cross-platform and let people use Mono on Linux? You're under generalizing what could be a popular challenge.


Many people (including myself until a few months ago) believe that C# only works on Windows, so he probably said Windows because that is all he thought it could run on.

C# would be a good challenge, although it would have made more sense if it was before the XNA challenge!
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#68 Raynes  Icon User is offline

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Re: Submit A Challenge

Posted 21 February 2010 - 05:35 AM

I'm pondering submitting a Factor challenge, but I don't know if anyone could do it. I think Factor could teach you guys a lot, and you've almost certainly not worked with anything like it before, considering it's a stack-based language. If anybody (at least two or three people) express interest, I'll submit one.
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#69 YamNad  Icon User is offline

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Re: Submit A Challenge

Posted 21 February 2010 - 06:04 AM

View PostRaynes, on 21 February 2010 - 12:35 PM, said:

I'm pondering submitting a Factor challenge, but I don't know if anyone could do it. I think Factor could teach you guys a lot, and you've almost certainly not worked with anything like it before, considering it's a stack-based language. If anybody (at least two or three people) express interest, I'll submit one.


I'd be interested in a Factor challenge - and I think others would up for it too. Although, if I am the only one expressing an interest then I wouldn't bother because I've been looking into Factor for a while anyway.
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#70 programble  Icon User is offline

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Re: Submit A Challenge

Posted 21 February 2010 - 09:59 AM

Factor sounds cool.
<<< See my title
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#71 Raynes  Icon User is offline

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Re: Submit A Challenge

Posted 21 February 2010 - 10:03 PM

That's two people. I'll get a Factor challenge in after my life quiets down a little bit. Tuesday morning, probably. Hopefully it will be considered.
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#72 Raynes  Icon User is offline

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Re: Submit A Challenge

Posted 24 February 2010 - 07:58 AM

Factor

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CHALLENGE: Write something fun in Factor.

Factor is definitely not something you're used to. It's a high-level, general purpose, stack-based programming language. The goal of the language is to be a complete and practical stack-based programming language.

From the Factor website: The Factor programming language combines powerful language features with a full-featured library. The implementation is fully compiled for performance, while still supporting interactive development. Factor applications are portable between all common platforms. Factor can deploy stand-alone applications on all platforms. Full source code for the Factor project is available under a BSD license.

More information can be found on the Factor website at http://factorcode.org/.

IDEAS:

* RPN calculator
* Simple website using Furnace
* Alarm clock
* etc

RESOURCES:

For quite some time, Factor has been too fast a moving target for much in the way of beginner tutorials and books and such. Therefore, http://docs.factorcode.org/ is the most complete resource available. Factor is heavily documented. All the documentation is there, you just have to find what you need. The biggest help you'll get is on the #concatenative IRC channel on irc.freenode.org. They are extremely helpful there, and will help you out with code reviews and such, and will answer your questions.

HOW TO GET STARTED:

You'll want to navigate to http://factorcode.org/ and pick up the latest stable or development release for your platform. When you run Factor, it will open a really cool window called the Listener. You can browse documentation all sorts of stuff there, and use it as an REPL. In the Listener, you can go to help to open the documentation browser. You'll then want to go through the Getting Started section of the docs, starting with "Your first program" and then the factor cookbook. After that, you can read code and search through the Factor docs to learn about things you don't understand. Anything else, you can ask questions about on the mailing list or IRC channel.

.uoy htiw eb ecrof eht yaM
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#73 Paul-  Icon User is offline

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Re: Submit A Challenge

Posted 28 February 2010 - 06:43 PM

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The Tersus Platform

CHALLENGE:
Find out about Tersus, the 100% visual, no coding platform

INTRODUCING THE LANGUAGE/TECHNOLOGY:
Are you ready for something different? Do you dare to try something unusual? Tersus is a visual programming platform especially suited for creating rich web applications. Applications are designed by drawing flow diagrams, without the need of any manual coding or scripting. The resulting models are then executed on the Tersus web server. Debugging is also done through a visual mechanism, by tracking the execution of a program on its diagram. The design concepts are quite original, unlike anything I have seen in other visual programming tools.

Programmers used to writing code in text form may shudder at the concept of purely visual programming. However, people who have tried it realize, I think, that it can be much more efficient in certain environments, where rapid and flexible development of simple tools is required. Think of visual development of GUIs, and try to mentally extrapolate the paradigm to creating entire applications. Well, seeing is believing. I think Tersus is an exciting concept, worth exploring at least for a week.


IDEAS:
  • Do one of the available tutorials.
  • Create a simple game implemented as a web application (such as number guessing).
  • Make an application that uses a web service.


RESOURCES:
The Tersus web site (http://www.tersus.com) is the main source of information. You can find there several step by step tutorials and a couple of video demos. There are numerous example applications, which you can try online, or download for individual study. The documentation also includes several reference manuals. A user forum is a useful means for asking questions.

HOW TO GET STARTED:

The Tersus platform is an open source system, which consists of the Tersus Studio and the Tersus Server. For the challenge you will only need the Tersus Studio, which comes with an embedded server and database, used for development. The standalone server is useful in a production environment, for the deployment of finished applications. Tersus Studio is based on the Eclipse IDE, and is available in binary form for Windows, Mac, and Ubuntu Linux (http://www.tersus.com). Even if you are not familiar with Eclipse, the software is easy to install. When you launch it, you will be brought right to the 30 second tutorial.

This post has been edited by Paul-: 28 February 2010 - 06:43 PM

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#74 Paul-  Icon User is offline

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Re: Submit A Challenge

Posted 28 February 2010 - 08:16 PM

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General Interface

CHALLENGE:
Experiment with the General Interface Ajax toolkit

INTRODUCING THE LANGUAGE/TECHNOLOGY:
General Interface (GI) is an Ajax toolkit and development environment for building web-based applications. It is an open source project sponsored by TIBCO and hosted by the Dojo Foundation. In both 2006 and 2007 it won the "Best Ajax Toolkit" award at InfoWorld. It has a serverless architecture, which simplifies both development and deployment. Its two main components are: GI Framework and GI Builder.

GI Framework is the deployment-time software that instantly adds rich client capabilities to a standard browser. In essence it is a Javascript library with an object-oriented API, organized into several packages (e.g. GUI, Data, Events).

GI Builder is a WYSIWYG development tool, using a drag and drop strategy for laying out components on a page. It offers a component library that is comprehensive, and extensible. One can rapidly build connections to servlets, XML data sources, and web services. GI Builder is itself an application powered by the GI Framework.


IDEAS:
  • Experiment by modifying one of the sample applications
  • Create an application that looks up longitude and latitude of an address
  • Make an interactive plot of some data

RESOURCES:
The starting point for learning about the General Interface is its official web site (http://www.generalinterface.org/). There is an introductory tutorial, which walks the reader through the basic steps of creating a project, working with the Builder environment, and deploying the finished application. If you prefer visual demos, there is a series of videos demonstrating the same concepts. A number of sample apps are available for download. A separate set of sample apps is available live at http://www.gojam.de/...5/Default.aspx. A developer guide, migration guide, and several reference documents complete the set of available resources. A developer forum is also available for asking question. From my experience the responses are often snotty.

HOW TO GET STARTED:
Download one of the pre-built GI packages from (http://www.generalinterface.org/). For the challenge, the debug build is recommended. Installation consists in simply unzipping the downloaded file to any convenient location. The folder will have a name of the form "gi-version-debug".

To start the application, open the GI folder and double-click on one of the “GI_Builder” files, for example on "GI_Builder.html". The GI Builder will open in your default web browser. The browser will prompt for allowing reading and writing to the file system, which you must accept. You will also have to agree to the license agreement the first time you launch the application, and you will have to choose a folder for your workspace. You are now ready for the introductory tutorial.

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#75 Paul-  Icon User is offline

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Re: Submit A Challenge

Posted 28 February 2010 - 09:48 PM

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Greenfoot

CHALLENGE:
Have fun with an appealing Java framework

INTRODUCING THE LANGUAGE/TECHNOLOGY:
Greenfoot may seem like a toy environment for youngsters to learn programming and create games, but it is much more. It certainly has the attraction of watching your programs come to life on your monitor, but it has everything to allow research on sophisticated machine learning algorithms, or any other advanced computer science topic you can think of.

According to its developers, Greenfoot is a combination of a framework for creating two-dimensional grid assignments in Java and an integrated development environment (class browser, editor, compiler, execution, etc.). Greenfoot supports the full Java language, but is especially useful for programming applications focused on object visualization and object interactions.

The Greenfoot framework is used to create a class hierarchy called “scenario” for a particular application. A scenario can be modified and extended with additional functionality. The framework allows to easily create and view graphical representations of objects belonging to a scenario. It also controls the execution of the program, typically implemented as a main loop, by starting, stopping, or stepping through the loop.

Greenfoot comes with an IDE, which has a source code editor, a class browser, and a debugger. A unique feature of Greenfoot is that it allows direct interaction with objects during execution of the program. New objects can be created, or existing objects can be moved in the world, or any other method can be called on an object.

Posted Image

IDEAS:
  • Explore the ants scenario and modify it in an interesting way
  • Make a simple game, such as asteroids, or pong
  • Solve the 8 queen puzzle http://en.wikipedia....t_queens_puzzle
  • Create a world populated by grass, deer and wolves, and watch it evolve over time



RESOURCES:
The Greenfoot web site (http://www.greenfoot.org) has a variety of resources to get you started. There are video and walk-through tutorials. Also API documentation and a programmer's manual. You can download existing scenarios, which you can build upon. An image library is available for use in your own programs. If you prefer the dead tree format, that is available too: http://www.amazon.co...ASIN=0136037534

HOW TO GET STARTED:
Download the appropriate installer for your operating system from http://www.greenfoot.org/download/. There are Windows and Mac installers available. For everything else, there is an executable jar file. Run the installer and follow the instructions on the screen. If you want to modify the supplied scenarios, copy them from the installation folder Greenfoot\scenarios to a user-specific location where you have write access. That's it. Have fun!
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