Best Platform to Code ?

is it ASP.net , PHP or Java ?

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4 Replies - 2551 Views - Last Post: 31 July 2006 - 01:45 AM

#1 Xenon  Icon User is offline

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Best Platform to Code ?

Posted 06 July 2006 - 10:05 PM

now i begin my career with a professional touch, till now i havent done anything much at all in Web programming, and now i intend to start it. now for developing E-Commerce Applications, which would be the best platform >

im choosing ASP.net using Vb , as im very comfortable with that. but i dont know the pro's and con's of the three distinct ways i see
in web development
PHP
ASP
JAVA

please describe

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Replies To: Best Platform to Code ?

#2 Amadeus  Icon User is offline

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Re: Best Platform to Code ?

Posted 07 July 2006 - 05:28 AM

Well, that's quite the question, and one that does not really have a defined answer.

ASP.NET is part of the .NET framework released by M$...a comprehensive set of languages, workspaces, and interoperable classes and objects that is meant to be the M$ answer to Java. Although I'm not the world's biggest M$ fan, the .NET framework is extremely versatile and easy to work with...you can even combine the languages. It sets up very well as a web programming interface, and has a whole host of predefined classes and objects meant to make web programming easier. There are some issues around speed when the web code is calling another application, but those issues can appear with any web programming technique...it is not unique to .NET.

PHP is another scripting language, modelled after C...it is extremely versatile as well, and easily incorporates classes and objects into web programming in a very efficient way. It is quick and lightweight, but offers full support for any task, including some very well defined functions for database interaction - the key to dynamic web programming.

Java is a platform independant language (actually, with the advent of the MONO project .NET can be as well, and PHP is simply an interpreter that can be installed on any platform)...most often used for application design, but also for web programming in the use of servlets and JSP pages...to be honest, I find it a little cumbersome for web programming (JSP can be prone to memory leaks - but so can most languages if memory is not handled properly), but many advocate it;s use for the web.

For eCommerce purposes, both .NET and PHP are favourites...many vendors of online transaction software have tools meant to work with both...I'm sure java does as well, but I'm less familiar with that.

In summary, they're all good, they all have some downsides...I'd advise trying them out, and going with whatever you feel most comfortable with.
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#3 William_Wilson  Icon User is offline

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Re: Best Platform to Code ?

Posted 07 July 2006 - 09:13 AM

I would agree. As far as java goes, in web development, you would likely be looking at javascript which is similar, but the context and keywords are a little different. The classic java, transformed into applets is pretty much outdated, but that doesn't mean you can't use it, just that you shouldn't. You must remember that java cannot access files on a server or user's computer directly, but it can create cookies. As much as i like Java for platform coding, i wouldn't recommend it for web development. Either .NET or a combination of javascript and php would probably be best.
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#4 mR_ob277  Icon User is offline

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Re: Best Platform to Code ?

Posted 30 July 2006 - 10:17 AM

If you going to create a web based application then no doubt go with Java, by Java I mean JavaEE (JSP, JSF, Servlets, JavaBeans ... etc all fall under the JavaEE umberlla).
http://java.sun.com/javaee/index.jsp

Java and Javascript are not similar at all, Javasciprt is just a toy scripting language.

A JSP memory leak problem has been a problem with the JVM implementation in the past and not with JSP itself. Solution if you running Tomcat v4 upgrade to v5.

Only use a Java applet if you want to run a Java program you wrote without the person having to download your byte code and run it from thier CLI, like a game you created.

PHP is ideal for simple single script web functionality, like a website hit counter or submitting form data and saving to a MySQL database.

As far as ASP goes its Microsoft, some people like it.

Try writing simple programs in all three see which one you like the best.
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#5 1lacca  Icon User is offline

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Re: Best Platform to Code ?

Posted 31 July 2006 - 01:45 AM

Just some thoughts, mostly subjective:
I think the use of these platforms depend on the size of the project you are working on. For smaller ones I prefer PHP because of rapid development, but for larger ones .NET and J2EE can be better in the long run.
Java and PHP are clearly platform independent, but .NET is bound to MS. MONO is a nice project, but it is not supported by MS, and it will never have all the shiny new features introduced in new .NET version.
Check the documentations available! I myself hate the MSDN library format, and find Javadoc the best, followed by PHP - I am referring to the documentation of the platform, other projects might have incomplete, or hard to use docs. A good idea is to map all the libraries or third party tools you might need in a project, and check them before diving into development, it can save you literally hundreds of hours choosing the platform based on this.
Applets are client-side applications, and they can access any resource on the client's computer- and on the server too, via HTTP, FTP or whatever protocol you prefer - , you just have to sign them, so they can ask for permissions. They can be very useful, and far from dead IMHO. Also, they are the easisest was to make sure, that the client has the latest version of your software that runs on his machine, as it is downloaded from your server.
I am not sure how Javascript got into this discussion, because it is mainly used for supplementary services - form validation, eye-candy - on client side, but not as a platform for e-commerce applications. It does have a server-side version you can use via the WSH, or some other way, but I am not sure if anyone use it to develop such applications, because it lacks the frameworks the other platforms mentioned above have.
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