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#1 Andrew1400  Icon User is offline

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Computer science jobs...

Posted 07 May 2010 - 02:55 PM

Hi,
I apologize if I am posting my question in a wrong forum...
I am a second year computer science student... I am not really good at programming... I am trying my best to improve my programming skills this summer ...
I would really appreciate it if someone could list some positions for a computer science graduate that does not require a lot of (or complicated) programming...
Do all the computer science jobs require programming???
Thanks

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Replies To: Computer science jobs...

#2 JackOfAllTrades  Icon User is offline

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Re: Computer science jobs...

Posted 07 May 2010 - 03:04 PM

Moved to Corner Cubicle.
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#3 keakTheGEEK  Icon User is offline

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Re: Computer science jobs...

Posted 07 May 2010 - 03:24 PM

Quote

Do all the computer science jobs require programming???


My answer to your question is if a job related to computer science doesn't require programming, then it requires knowledge about programming. Typically a project manager or consultant may not actually do the programming, but they most likely have programmed before and have a lot of experience programming complex projects which I think is necessary to be in a project management position.

Learning how to program is difficult. There definitely is a steep learning curve. As a programmer I can tell you that you're always going to have to learn new things, but it gets easier once you understand the concept of programming.


My advice to you is that if you're just worried because you're not good at it right now, but you honestly do like learning how to write software then to hang in there. It takes practice and dedication. If you honestly just don't like it, then you should consider studying something else. Maybe just do a minor in computer science and major in something that you would enjoy,...

This post has been edited by keakTheGEEK: 07 May 2010 - 03:43 PM

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#4 Choscura  Icon User is offline

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Re: Computer science jobs...

Posted 07 May 2010 - 04:25 PM

No. You have to program. You have to know how to program (which means you have to program). Don't use Java. Do programs that solve your own problems which aren't outside of your skill level (or at least not much) and focus on how to do whatever you need to do in the program.
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#5 Locke  Icon User is offline

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Re: Computer science jobs...

Posted 07 May 2010 - 07:57 PM

View PostChoscura, on 07 May 2010 - 05:25 PM, said:



...?

I hope you're only talking about college. Java is perfectly fine if not used as a learning tool. (that's not quite how I want to word it, but I can't think of a better way...perhaps "Just so long as you actually GET the background using pointers and direct memory usage, and actually understand the theory behind it.)
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#6 macosxnerd101  Icon User is online

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Re: Computer science jobs...

Posted 07 May 2010 - 08:06 PM

Java is a fine language both professionally and academically, at least at the introductory classes. I also believe that various paradigms should be taught in college as students advance, along with varying languages including assembly for any CS degree, which will give the experience with pointers. By the way, Java is not the only language that does this- take a look at C#, Python, and many other high-level languages. Anyways, getting back on topic.

@OP: There is a difference between a Software Engineering Job and an IT job. You could go into a field like networking and security, which involves little to no programming depending on the employer.
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