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#1 uxcode  Icon User is offline

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Notes on Ruby

Posted 24 May 2010 - 04:03 PM

A PDF file is attached. It contains a brief introduction to Ruby.

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INDEX


1 Introduction to Ruby
2 Standard Types
2.1 Strings
2.1.1 Strings and Embedded Evaluation
2.2 Numbers
2.3 Ranges
2.4 Regular Expressions
3 Methods, Classes, and Objects
3.1 Methods
3.2 Local and Global Variables
3.3 Classes and Objects
4 Arrays and Hashes
4.1 Arrays
4.1.1 Multidimensional Arrays
4.2 Hashes
5 Loops and Iterators
5.1 For Loops
5.1.1 Multiple Iterator Arguments
5.2 While Loops
5.3 Until Loops
5.4 Loop
5.5 Integers as Iterators
6 Conditional Statements
6.1 If Statements
6.2 Unless Statements
6.3 If and Unless Modifiers
6.4 Case Statements

Attached File(s)


This post has been edited by uxcode: 25 May 2010 - 03:40 PM


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#2 Martyr2  Icon User is offline

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Re: Notes on Ruby

Posted 24 May 2010 - 04:07 PM

These forums are reserved for asking questions and receiving help. Unless you actually have a question, you may want to actually create a tutorial and submit it for consideration in the Ruby tutorial forum. This post really serves no purpose since you don't even really provide any notes other than some topic headings.

Edit: I see you have now supplied a pdf. Thanks.

This post has been edited by Martyr2: 24 May 2010 - 04:08 PM

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Re: Notes on Ruby

Posted 25 May 2010 - 11:28 AM

View PostMartyr2, on 24 May 2010 - 03:07 PM, said:

These forums are reserved for asking questions and receiving help. Unless you actually have a question, you may want to actually create a tutorial and submit it for consideration in the Ruby tutorial forum. This post really serves no purpose since you don't even really provide any notes other than some topic headings.

Edit: I see you have now supplied a pdf. Thanks.

NP, It's Okay :)
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#4 m-e-g-a-z  Icon User is offline

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Re: Notes on Ruby

Posted 25 May 2010 - 08:02 PM

Nice PDF.
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#5 MitkOK  Icon User is offline

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Re: Notes on Ruby

Posted 18 July 2010 - 02:00 PM

Just a note: it's idiomatic to name variables and methods with underscores, not in CamelCase. The latter is used in naming classes.

Also in Ruby "return" is not widely used, as the last value is returned implicitly.

As I glimpsed the pdf, I would say that there are many mistakes, based on not understanding Ruby, like "there are some methods can be applied to integers".

This is typical mistake by programmers comming to Ruby: using other languages idioms in Ruby like naming stuff, thinking about OOP, method invocation, etc.

To the author: good effort, but I recommend reading some good book, like "The Well-Grounded Rubyist"

This post has been edited by MitkOK: 18 July 2010 - 02:11 PM

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#6 uxcode  Icon User is offline

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Re: Notes on Ruby

Posted 28 July 2010 - 09:27 PM

View PostMitkOK, on 18 July 2010 - 01:00 PM, said:

Just a note: it's idiomatic to name variables and methods with underscores, not in CamelCase. The latter is used in naming classes.

Also in Ruby "return" is not widely used, as the last value is returned implicitly.

As I glimpsed the pdf, I would say that there are many mistakes, based on not understanding Ruby, like "there are some methods can be applied to integers".

This is typical mistake by programmers comming to Ruby: using other languages idioms in Ruby like naming stuff, thinking about OOP, method invocation, etc.

To the author: good effort, but I recommend reading some good book, like "The Well-Grounded Rubyist"

Thanks for your review.
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