3 Replies - 758 Views - Last Post: 08 June 2010 - 10:52 AM

#1 RedSon  Icon User is offline

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Anyone using boost vs Microsoft Libraries

Posted 03 June 2010 - 01:31 PM

Have you or your place of business decided to use boost over various vendor available libraries like the ones that exist in Visual Studio?

I was hoping to get some first hand accounts of your experiences with it. Recommend it or not? Was it hard to deploy to the organization? What was the cost/benefit?

Was it hard to get it by your legal team?

Thanks!
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Replies To: Anyone using boost vs Microsoft Libraries

#2 Oler1s  Icon User is offline

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Re: Anyone using boost vs Microsoft Libraries

Posted 03 June 2010 - 03:08 PM

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Have you or your place of business decided to use boost over various vendor available libraries like the ones that exist in Visual Studio?
Boost does not compete with implementations offered by compilers. Vendors do not reimplement boost. Vendors implement the standard library.

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I was hoping to get some first hand accounts of your experiences with it. Recommend it or not?
Some aspects of boost are vital. Smart pointers, program options, regex, stdint support, and so on. I wouldn't recommend reinventing these aspects, that's for sure.

Some of Boost functionality has been folded into C++0x, which vendors may have partial support for (like VC++ 2010, and gcc 4.4 onwards). Otherwise, you must use Boost.
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#3 bodom658  Icon User is offline

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Re: Anyone using boost vs Microsoft Libraries

Posted 08 June 2010 - 09:57 AM

I'm more leaned towards boost, because it's cross platform. Also, I tend to work strictly in Linux, and therefor do not have access to Microsoft Libraries to begin with.
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#4 NickDMax  Icon User is offline

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Re: Anyone using boost vs Microsoft Libraries

Posted 08 June 2010 - 10:52 AM

Well I don't work in C++ so I don't know how popular it is in the workplace but I find it to be a wonderful library. I don't see it replacing too much from compiler vendor libraries -- I don't even find that it competes too much with STL, but it is nice to have in your pocket.


As a C++ Programmer I think that learning about boost is an important educational step -- there are some *fantastic* things going on in many of those libraries, of course one programmer's "fantastic" can be another's "god awful". Love it or hate it, there is a LOT to learn from. Indeed many of the C++0X features are either directly from Boost or are taken from lessons learned in the development or one of the libraries.

If you are interested in "reading" the boost code I recommend the Boost::Preprocessor code which is very enlightening, Boost::Tuple or Boost:Array -- neither are really hard to get into and yet there are some very interesting techniques used. Boost::MPL -- love it or hate it Template metaprogramming is a very interesting discovery! I would not say this was a very easy library to read or get much out of (I am still staring at it from time to time) -- but there are some very useful tweaks of thought that go into TMP and so I highly recommend looking this source code over.

SO I don't know if I can really offer much to your original question: Though I can say that as licenses become a little more standard it is becoming much easier to get legal departments to approve the use of open source libraries. I know when I first started working (I work in JavaEE) we had a couple of OSS libraries we were told to avoid, but I have not run into too much of that recently.
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