Source Control

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37 Replies - 12743 Views - Last Post: 11 October 2010 - 02:01 PM

#16 Locke  Icon User is offline

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Re: Source Control

Posted 05 October 2010 - 09:08 AM

We're using Subversion in my Software Engineering class as well as at my job. Still a few kinks to work out with doing it on the command line (software eng.) and through Eclipse (work). :crazy:

It seems like it's useful, though. I haven't read up on others, just what my SW Eng. professor has told us about source code control and stuff.
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#17 Sergio Tapia  Icon User is offline

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Re: Source Control

Posted 05 October 2010 - 09:21 AM

We're using TFS at work with Eclipse. I really dislike using it and getting the latest version of the code is a pain in the ass. :S

Merges sometimes fail, etc.

I've been using Mercurial at home for my projects and it's a blast! Really fun to use and let's me work on my actual code instead of fighting with it. If you're new to Mercurial or don't know what a DVCS is, check out HgInit.com
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#18 Guest_Trent*


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Re: Source Control

Posted 05 October 2010 - 09:33 AM

I am also a .Net developer that works with VS alone. Our company moved to Subversion from VSS about 4 years ago. I was appointed to figure out which source control solution would work best for us. I chose Subversion. There is also a great tool called ankhSVN that integrates seamlessly with VS. We also use Tortoise SVN. I would also look into using git. It's a fairly new source control solution that is gaining a huge following due to the performance increase compared to Subversion. I have not worked with git just yet so cannot comment on the differences, pros or cons. Hope this helps.
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#19 t2kocurek  Icon User is offline

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Re: Source Control

Posted 05 October 2010 - 09:35 AM

I am also a .Net developer that works with VS alone. Our company moved to Subversion from VSS about 4 years ago. I was appointed to figure out which source control solution would work best for us. I chose Subversion. There is also a great tool called ankhSVN that integrates seamlessly with VS. We also use Tortoise SVN. I would also look into using git. It's a fairly new source control solution that is gaining a huge following due to the performance increase compared to Subversion. I have not worked with git just yet so cannot comment on the differences, pros or cons. Hope this helps.

Sorry to repost. I had not signed in yet.
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#20 sl4ck3r  Icon User is offline

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Re: Source Control

Posted 05 October 2010 - 09:53 AM

I have been using SVN (Subversion) exclusively for the past few years so I really have no experience with other version control systems however I thought i could help you out with plugins.

Windows / Folders:
TortoiseSVN integrates SVN procedures into your windows folder / explorer view ( http://tortoisesvn.tigris.org/ ).

Visual Studio:
For Visual Studio there are a couple different plugins to integrate SVN into your interface. The one I use is called Ankh SVN ( http://ankhsvn.open.collab.net/ ). I believe you need TortoiseSVN installed to use it. It works great for me, although some of my colleagues prefer this next product. It is called VisualSVN ( http://www.visualsvn.com/ ). It integrates with Visual Studio much like Ankh SVN however it isn't free (except for education I think). The same company also makes a product called VisualSVN Server and it is free. VisualSVN server makes it easy to get SVN working. At home I have VisualSVN with Ankh SVN. I'm not sure what my work SVN servers run.

Most developers I have seen have TortoiseSVN and one of the two plugins I listed installed. This allows you to manipulate files from windows or in visual studio.

This post has been edited by sl4ck3r: 05 October 2010 - 09:54 AM

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#21 stayscrisp  Icon User is offline

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Re: Source Control

Posted 05 October 2010 - 10:32 AM

I also use Tortoise SVN with the windows/explorer plugin sl4ck3r mentioned for a year or two and it's always served me well.

I have used Git but only to get the latest builds of the Lua scripting language so I don't have much experience, that was pretty painless though.
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#22 Raynes  Icon User is offline

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Re: Source Control

Posted 05 October 2010 - 01:35 PM

I use Git for *everything*. I use it to version control standard non-code text files. Seriously -- it's that awesome. The combination of Git and Github is near unbeatable. If I had Git as an option, I'd be all over it.

If you're forced to choose between SVN and CVS, you'd probably be better off going with the former.
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#23 Dogstopper  Icon User is offline

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Re: Source Control

Posted 05 October 2010 - 03:32 PM

For a Windows system, I definitely suggest SVN. I use it in all two of my major applications and its as simple as keeping a version local on the development machine and when you want to make a commit, just checkout from the repository, update the checkout folder with whatever file(s) you want to update, and then simply commit the changes. And since you will be using windows, you can use TortoiseSVN, which makes it very simple to do.
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#24 reaper4334  Icon User is offline

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Re: Source Control

Posted 05 October 2010 - 04:03 PM

From what I've heard, if you use TFS (Team Foundation Server) with Visual Studio, it works pretty nicely.
Aside from that I've only ever used Subversion, but I can't say I have any complaints with it.
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#25 metric  Icon User is offline

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Re: Source Control

Posted 06 October 2010 - 08:28 AM

I would recommend SVN.

CVS is very simple...I use it for projects where I'm the only one and it isn't very big.

SVN is great because you can setup proper trackers, and it is a little more lightweight. Has a lot of features that CVS doesn't....

I use CVS for my 'school folder' which contains about half a dozen word files per class...other than that I won't trust it with anything big.
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#26 T3hC13h  Icon User is offline

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Re: Source Control

Posted 06 October 2010 - 08:41 AM

I've used SVN (with TortoiseSVN) as my main SCM for what must be going on a year and have no issues with it using both a SVN server instance and repos created on a fileserver (single dev).

I've used Git a little here and there but I haven't found its distributed nature to add any value over SVN for my projects.

If a single central repository works for you then I'd say SVN. If you want a distributed repository then I'd recommend Git.
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#27 johnny_bgoode  Icon User is offline

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Re: Source Control

Posted 06 October 2010 - 08:45 AM

I would definitely choose the more modern SVN over CVS, if those are your only options.

Personally, having worked with SVN in the past and switching to mercurial recently I have to say that I prefer mercurial over other source control methods I've used.

It's true that Git and mercurial require a little bit of re-learning if you are used to the CVS/SVN paradigm, but they are much more powerful utilities and prove to be easier to use in the long run.
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#28 dorknexus  Icon User is offline

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Re: Source Control

Posted 06 October 2010 - 02:54 PM

Git is great because it's decentralized and you can just setup a repository with a single command and not have to configure an SVN server or anything like that.
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#29 smacdav  Icon User is offline

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Re: Source Control

Posted 06 October 2010 - 05:21 PM

The company where I did my internship last spring used SVN; it definitely served the purposes of the (small) company well. I've never used CVS, so I can't compare, but I definitely had a good experience with SVN.

My current company is much larger and uses IBM Rational Synergy. It's expensive and awful, IMO. It has some nice features, but it's very slow and the interface is incredibly unintuitive.
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#30 eclipsed4utoo  Icon User is offline

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Re: Source Control

Posted 07 October 2010 - 11:44 AM

Thanks to everybody for providing your experiences.
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