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#1 AlbuquerqueApache  Icon User is offline

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When did you know to move on?

Posted 15 October 2010 - 05:05 AM

Hey guys. I got my first IT job about 3 years ago when I got out of school for the first time (Associates. I have since gone back to finish my BS). I got employed at an organization doing pretty much anything and everything.I would say that I work in a multi-tier environment doing everything from basic help desk support to network/software support. Initially this was very challenging and I enjoyed it. Now I feel that I am ready to move on but management just wants the status quo to stay the same. I don't see any real opportunities for advancement or to find something more challenging. The only reason I really even hesitate is because of the condition of the US economy. I know things are bad, but I really don't think the whole business should be bad because the economy is in a slump.

Anyway, I imagine something like this happens to alot of IT (Network, Programmers, etc.) people. What did you guys do when you ran into this situation?

Thanks!

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Replies To: When did you know to move on?

#2 lordofduct  Icon User is offline

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Re: When did you know to move on?

Posted 15 October 2010 - 06:44 AM

You could do a few things.

Shut up and put up - I'd say no to this one... but some people may say it's the most secure. Bah!

Go fishing - throw your resume out there, see if you get any bites. It's not like you can't just go and take a look around; just don't do it on your job's dime.

Screw work, I'm hunting - just quit your job and going full time hunting for a better job. Kind of stupid in this market though... it's like hunting for moose in Connecticut... yeah they've been spotted there, but you need to drive a few miles north to actually find them.
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#3 AlbuquerqueApache  Icon User is offline

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Re: When did you know to move on?

Posted 15 October 2010 - 09:03 AM

View Postlordofduct, on 15 October 2010 - 05:44 AM, said:

You could do a few things.

Shut up and put up - I'd say no to this one... but some people may say it's the most secure. Bah!

Go fishing - throw your resume out there, see if you get any bites. It's not like you can't just go and take a look around; just don't do it on your job's dime.

Screw work, I'm hunting - just quit your job and going full time hunting for a better job. Kind of stupid in this market though... it's like hunting for moose in Connecticut... yeah they've been spotted there, but you need to drive a few miles north to actually find them.


LOL... thanks for the tips. I think I might try to make this thread a little more inclusive and less me centric.

What do you guys do in situations where your stifled by management?


thanks.
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#4 Craig328  Icon User is offline

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Re: When did you know to move on?

Posted 15 October 2010 - 09:46 AM

Once upon a time, I was the lead dev for a company down in Florida. It was a small firm (maybe 10 people) and we produced products for document manipulation/management. I built their flagship product (a web-based document repository) in Coldfusion and it was a fine little product that worked efficiently, was customizable to pretty much any industry and which I expanded (although they lacked the foresight to appreciate this) to accommodate nearly any kind of electronic file and not simply .pdf's and .doc's which they specified.

However, shortly after my arrival (6-8 mos) the jackass VP of Sales (who had determined that this product's package should have a sale price of roughly $30K...which was probably about 10x what it was actually worth) managed to blame the complete lack of sales on the branch manager and so managed to get him fired so he could take over. The situation was now developer reporting to VP of Sales who was the genesis of the every PEBCAK and ID-10-T joke you ever heard. This was the first sign to move on...but I ignored it as the dot com bubble was busily bursting at the time and, hey, steady paychecks are addictive.

As my tenure at this company grew (and the bubble finished its bursting with the attendant oversupply of jobless colleagues) I kept my mouth firmly shut whilst enduring meetings wherein variously useless sales cronies the boss brought in to "pump up sales" (meaning literally "anything better than the ZERO we're at now") would stand up and utter every single word found on your typical buzzword bingo card and then go back to surfing porn on the web (which I was painfully aware of as I was also the supervisor for the network admin). The pressure to say something grew and grew until one day I couldn't stand it any longer and after a presentation by one of these idiots I actually asked "hey, have we ever examined the price we're charging for this as someone seeing our demo and then hiring a dev to build the exact same thing is much less than the price you're charging"? I was told I was singularly unqualified to render an opinion as to what the value of the software was (despite having built the entire thing from scratch and being the sole person maintaining it) and that should my opinion be required it would be canvassed. This was my second sign to move on. However, paycheck addiction had intensified with the birth of a daughter and son in the interim.

The third sign came when I provided an honest answer to a baldface "yes/no" question posed to me by the owner of the company as to what the primary impediment to the division's success was. Actually, the answer wasn't the third sign...it was the hiring of the VP of Sales' son-in-law who knew practically nothing about software development as my "assistant" and to whom I was to impart every bit of knowledge I had as to how to build and maintain the flagship product.

I acted on the third sign, and because by then the vast pool of un and underemployed developers had dissipated from the dot com implosion, I shopped my resume to various opportunities and was immediately inundated with inquiries which, I now firmly believe, were interested only in laying eyes on a software dev who had actually survived the dot com implosion while working for a singularly unprofitable business. I believe I may have been unique.

That's when I knew to move on...and it worked out for the best.

This post has been edited by Craig328: 15 October 2010 - 09:49 AM

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#5 keakTheGEEK  Icon User is offline

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Re: When did you know to move on?

Posted 15 October 2010 - 10:18 AM

@OP, I was in a similar situation after landing my first full-time job as an in house software developer right after college. The experience was great, but there was really no opportunity for career advancement. Technology wise, the company was way too behind the times and a majority of the senior developers were so molded in their ways that they would fight viciously against any kind of change (upgrade tools, use a better version control, business process, etc).

After putting up with all the b.s. and spending months on end after work trying to get up to speed by taking classes, going through online tutorials and having virtually no life I realized that it was time to move on. This was all within a year to a year and a half ago. Despite the economy (I live in California and the economy is very bad out here) I was able to move on, finding another opportunity that was everything that I wanted and more in a very promising industry.

It wasn't easy though. I probably spent about 8 or more months all together updating and revising my resume, searching and applying for jobs as well as interviewing. I would do this a couple hours after work a few days a week. I found positions that I just wasn't interested in after going through the whole interview process as well as companies that just weren't interested in me. Having a job while doing this is good because you're not so desperate to just find anything. You can pick and choose the job openings that best fit the criteria that you are looking for.

This post has been edited by keakTheGEEK: 15 October 2010 - 10:25 AM

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