11 Replies - 1208 Views - Last Post: 09 January 2011 - 06:02 PM

#1 d.koen  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 1
  • View blog
  • Posts: 42
  • Joined: 08-November 10

C++

Posted 30 December 2010 - 07:31 PM

do you guys and gals think C++ will ever be outdated or unused? I taught myself C++ and am looking into new languages but I don't want to keep focusing my attention on a language that won't be around to much longer.
Is This A Good Question/Topic? 0
  • +

Replies To: C++

#2 cfoley  Icon User is online

  • Cabbage
  • member icon

Reputation: 2021
  • View blog
  • Posts: 4,191
  • Joined: 11-December 07

Re: C++

Posted 30 December 2010 - 08:58 PM

You're safe for the next few decades, probably for the rest of your life too.
Was This Post Helpful? 1
  • +
  • -

#3 Dogstopper  Icon User is offline

  • The Ninjaducky
  • member icon



Reputation: 2874
  • View blog
  • Posts: 11,032
  • Joined: 15-July 08

Re: C++

Posted 30 December 2010 - 09:08 PM

I don't think C++ will die out (for several decades). Obviously, there are alternatives, but there are still companies that use COBOL and scientific studies made these days that use FORTRAN. If those haven't died out, then chances are that C++ won't either.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#4 Curtis Rutland  Icon User is online

  • (╯□)╯︵ (~ .o.)~
  • member icon


Reputation: 4496
  • View blog
  • Posts: 7,847
  • Joined: 08-June 10

Re: C++

Posted 03 January 2011 - 08:45 AM

It's a matter of how entrenched something becomes. COBOL isn't going to die any time soon because of where it's mostly used: mainframes. And those are used in places like financial institutions, that change slowly if at all. Bleeding edge is actually a bad word there. Stability and history are important for these organizations, and what better than a platform and language with over 40 years of history?

C/C++ is in a similar situation, except very distributed instead of focused. C/C++ is so deeply embedded in so many industries (especially for games, and for embedded systems, but in almost every field you can find it) that you'll always be able to find work if you really do know C/C++.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#5 no2pencil  Icon User is online

  • Admiral Fancy Pants
  • member icon

Reputation: 5345
  • View blog
  • Posts: 27,296
  • Joined: 10-May 07

Re: C++

Posted 03 January 2011 - 08:56 AM

Depends on what you want to use C++ for.

If you are looking to write Web Development cgi-bin, you've missed the bus by about 10 years. If you are looking to write system functionality, or working with hardware, you should be all set.

However it doesn't just stop with the language. You'll need to continue learning about system API's, protocols, & how Operating Systems function. All of this depends on what you are wanting to do with C++.

& this really goes for any language.
Was This Post Helpful? 3
  • +
  • -

#6 Patrunjel  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Regular
  • member icon

Reputation: 17
  • View blog
  • Posts: 298
  • Joined: 28-October 10

Re: C++

Posted 04 January 2011 - 06:58 AM

C++ is kinda like jesus...Tricked them in, then, before anywone noticed, they couldn't get out :)
C++ is always updated (not always, but you get the point), actualy new standards are coming up this year.Finaly after a long time, it will be not-as-used, but it will never die.Anyway, by then, robots will do the programming, and we will relax somewhere in Bahams, with all the hula-hula girls :)
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#7 sas1ni69  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Regular
  • member icon

Reputation: 85
  • View blog
  • Posts: 431
  • Joined: 04-December 08

Re: C++

Posted 05 January 2011 - 11:13 PM

The thing with programming is that it's never a loss to learn a programming language even if it eventually becomes less popular. It can only increase your skills and expose you to different concepts. By the time some other language becomes popular, you'll be able to grasp it really quickly. Newer languages are usually based on older ones.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#8 d.koen  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 1
  • View blog
  • Posts: 42
  • Joined: 08-November 10

Re: C++

Posted 06 January 2011 - 05:34 PM

Well that kind of motivates me to keep learning :)
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#9 Core  Icon User is offline

  • using System.Linq;
  • member icon

Reputation: 774
  • View blog
  • Posts: 5,097
  • Joined: 08-December 08

Re: C++

Posted 09 January 2011 - 03:01 AM

If you expect to stick with one language only, you are making a mistake right there. Even if it disappears, you as a programmer should be able to switch to something else. Never expect something to last forever, just saying.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#10 Kilorn  Icon User is offline

  • XNArchitect
  • member icon



Reputation: 1356
  • View blog
  • Posts: 3,528
  • Joined: 03-May 10

Re: C++

Posted 09 January 2011 - 03:10 AM

I've always viewed programming as sort of a never ending quest for knowledge. Even if you spend 10+ years on a single language, there are always new API's, new technologies, and new ways of implementation popping up year after year. It's not something that you can study for a couple years, and say "Oh yea, I know everything there is to know about x"
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#11 Guest_Dakota Koen*


Reputation:

Re: C++

Posted 09 January 2011 - 05:26 PM

actually I'm simply wanting to make sure I get the basics down in C++ before I move on, I've noticed once you learn one language it's not to hard to start learning another, even VB is a little like C++ (I took a class in college on VB) so no I can honestly say sticking with one language is the farthest from my goals, I'm planning on looking into Python, Perl, and Java (which is VERY like C++)
Was This Post Helpful? 0

#12 Kilorn  Icon User is offline

  • XNArchitect
  • member icon



Reputation: 1356
  • View blog
  • Posts: 3,528
  • Joined: 03-May 10

Re: C++

Posted 09 January 2011 - 06:02 PM

Making the transition to any Object Oriented language from C++ will be easy for the most part. Especially if you're planning to learn C#. Once you understand the basics of Object Oriented Programming, or OOP, then any language that is object oriented will be easy to learn. It's just a matter of learning the differences in syntax and frameworks.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

Page 1 of 1