Attention programmers and/or software engineers

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22 Replies - 2588 Views - Last Post: 27 July 2012 - 01:41 PM

#16 xclite  Icon User is offline

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Re: Attention programmers and/or software engineers

Posted 05 January 2011 - 07:35 AM

View PostNoBrain, on 05 January 2011 - 10:24 AM, said:

yea but i still dont think its programing language anyway. its Structured Query Language. As JackOfAllTrades say it helps you use the database. its like to tell me that you can program on command prompt


Unbolding Language doesn't make it less of one. Moreover, you can program on a command prompt using a SCRIPTING LANGUAGE.
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#17 raziel_  Icon User is offline

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Re: Attention programmers and/or software engineers

Posted 05 January 2011 - 07:56 AM

But not on command prompt on it self. As it is with the SQL it helps you manage the queries to your DB to get the info. easier but you use another language (VBA in Access for instance) to write your programs. Anyhow excuse me for the little sidetrack. :)
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#18 xclite  Icon User is offline

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Re: Attention programmers and/or software engineers

Posted 05 January 2011 - 09:42 AM

Accepting that a valid definition of programming language is "A programming language is an artificial language designed to express computations that can be performed by a machine," SQL is a programming language. Depending on what other constraints you add, you can debate and get pedantic about it. In the end, it's a language that allows you to manipulate a machine and perform computation. Maybe you want all languages to be Turing Complete?

> This is irrelevant, but out of my own curiosity, what is the highest university degree you have obtained? And what field or concentration did you study?
BS Computer Science

> Do you work at home? Or is your work based in an office/industrial environment with co-workers and supervisor?
Office environment with a lead.
> Do you collaborate with other programmers and/or software engineers as in a team, or is your work primarily an individual effort? Or perhaps both?
A mixture of both, varies by project.
> What is your average annual salary? (if you don't mind telling me; if you do mind, then please skip this question)

> What kind of programming/coding do you do? What languages? What kind of software?
C, C++, Ada, Java - data analysis tools, database querying systems, tactical systems.
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#19 metric  Icon User is offline

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Re: Attention programmers and/or software engineers

Posted 05 January 2011 - 10:25 AM

I'm still a student, 3rd year in a CIS degree, and planning on a masters as soon as I graduate.

I was cautioned by my program adviser that going for a masters right away can make job placement difficult because of your education level they have to pay you a certain amount and with no job experience your probably useless to them for the first several months. Because i'm going for my masters right away, I'm going to try and offset my life experience in the area by building a good size portfolio and my uni offers a co-op program.

As the saying goes "You'll learn 90% of what you know in the workplace." A degree gives you the foundation for learning what you need to know. Consider a co-op program?

In my opinion working from home can create gaps in your knowledge, sure after you have been in the industry for awhile you will know enough to get buy but you may lose valuable information that could be picked up from co-workers. imho there is no form of communication as good as face to face communication.

Also, SQL is a programming language...my uni has classes dedicated to it (and theory of it).

Cheers Metric
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#20 AnalyticLunatic  Icon User is offline

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Re: Attention programmers and/or software engineers

Posted 24 July 2012 - 02:39 PM

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> This is irrelevant, but out of my own curiosity, what is the highest university degree you have obtained? And what field or concentration did you study?

Associate of Applied Science Degree in Computer Programming, General & Web Design Option.
Starting courses this fall for Bachelors of Science Degree in Computer Science.

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> Do you work at home? Or is your work based in an office/industrial environment with co-workers and supervisor?

Office with one co-worker and one supervisor. Kinda grayish area though since my apartment is about 5 miles from here :lol:

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> Do you collaborate with other programmers and/or software engineers as in a team, or is your work primarily an individual effort? Or perhaps both?

Both, being new I often have to ask for explanation on data flow to get the grasp of exactly what it is a program is doing for the end user, and also, being new, I get tagged in to do debugging and documentation.

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> What is your average annual salary? (if you don't mind telling me; if you do mind, then please skip this question)

More than I need, Less than I would like.

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> What kind of programming/coding do you do? What languages? What kind of software?


Visual Basic .NET Desktop Applications, some Web, and Access Database Applications in some instances. Also, I am listing Structured Query Language!

Advice: Between my own research and the advice I have received from coworkers/friends/family and several high ranking Software Developers in their own respective positions, get the Masters if you truly want it, but it honestly isn't going to help you all that much with landing a position. As some have said, having a Masters entitles companies to pay you a little more, but also, many Software Developer positions all across the U.S. simply ask for a Bachelors Degree in the field for education, and past that, it's all based on your own experience and what you can bring to the table. I worked 6 months with one of the worlds largest book publishers and after receiving my Associate was picked up by a different agency in town. If you have the skills, they will overlook and/or sometimes pay for that extra education.

As for the work from home, I personally work better in an office setting, but wouldn't mind 3 days in/2 days out type set-up. Being so close to work it's hard to justify being given the telecommuting position. This type of privilege however is usually reserved for people who have been with the company for at LEAST a year or two and have proven their character and abilities, especially if their is justifiable reason like an individual commuting 2 hours one way everyday to the office or wishing to be more flexible to be with their family.
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#21 DivideByZero  Icon User is offline

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Re: Attention programmers and/or software engineers

Posted 26 July 2012 - 01:20 AM

Do you work at home? Or is your work based in an office/industrial environment with co-workers and supervisor?

I work in a small office with five of my co workers.

Do you collaborate with other programmers and/or software engineers as in a team, or is your work primarily an individual effort? Or perhaps both?

As I'm still new to professional programming (literally graduated from university yesterday), I have to collaborate a lot with my co workers because of asking for help when I get stuck.
Though even if I didn't get stuck, I still have to collaborate a lot as some problems rely of another programmer's code to work. Or maybe the code I'm working with is written by someone else and I need them to explain to me the intention of the code.

What kind of programming/coding do you do? What languages? What kind of software?

I predominately use ASP.NET MVC with C#, Javascript with jQuery, SQL, HTML and CSS.
The software I use the most are Windows XP, Visual Studio ultimate 2010 and SQL server management 2008.

This post has been edited by DivideByZero: 26 July 2012 - 01:25 AM

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#22 BBeck  Icon User is offline

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Re: Attention programmers and/or software engineers

Posted 26 July 2012 - 01:57 PM

I know kind of what you mean saying SQL is not a language. I can certainly understand why an outsider would think that.

SQL is not a language in the sense that Assembler is a language, but then again neither is C#, Python, Basic, Java, or any sort of "language" that doesn't compile straight down to machine code. If there's a JIT compiler, interpreter, or virtual machine, it's not the same caliber of language as C, C++, or Assembler.

I totally "get" that SQL is not the sort of language you would use to program non-database applications in.

But if you know SQL, you get into writing Stored Procedures and Triggers, and that's where you figure out that it's a language. Doing a single SELECT query isn't really "writing code", but when you start writing complex stored procedures or triggers with complex logic, it's a language. True, it's running inside the server's service and not compiled(actually now that I think about it, stored procedures are compiled much in the same way C# or Java is "compiled" - just not into machine code), but there's most of the primary structures of a computer language like variables and fairly complex branching logic. You also have functions and procedures. And in SQL Server you also have Extended Stored Procedures and CLR Stored Procures. While technically that's not SQL, it can be called directly from SQL to extend SQL to do almost anything imaginable. Using CLR or Extended Stored Procedures (and some extra hardware) you could write a SQL procedure to flush your toilet. So, "Language" gets my vote. (Although, I have a lot more respect for someone competent in C++ than I do someone who knows SQL. C++ is just a whole lot more difficult and a whole lot more capable.)

This post has been edited by BBeck: 26 July 2012 - 02:04 PM

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#23 lordofduct  Icon User is offline

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Re: Attention programmers and/or software engineers

Posted 27 July 2012 - 01:41 PM

Old thread is old...
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