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#1 jjsaw5  Icon User is offline

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Promotions

Posted 15 February 2011 - 11:57 AM

After a discussion with another coworker today I would like to share this with you guys and get your thoughts and start a discussion on how to ask for and or handle getting promotions at work.

First...the conversation from today.
This person has worked here for a little over 4 years. A new employee was recently hired in their group and has less then a years experience in the field(recent college grad). Today doing some work on project the "New Guy" sent an e-mail out to several people and included his title in his e-mail signature.

The "New Guy" is at the intermediate level. When my coworker saw the e-mail he was a little enraged for a couple reasons...
-He claims to have only had one small raise in four years and continues to hear "next year we will bump you up"
-He is a big part of the team he works on. If he were to leave it would put his group into a tail spin.
-He is only an associate but does the work that senior level people do and he is very very good at what he does.


He came to me for advice but frankly this is a tough situation. How would you handle it? Would you talk to your boss about it? Do you not say anything?

So I'll open it up to you guys....
How do you handle situations where you feel you deserve a promotion or raise?

What advice would you have for the situation i have described...

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Replies To: Promotions

#2 ForcedSterilizationsForAll  Icon User is offline

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Re: Promotions

Posted 15 February 2011 - 12:38 PM

Other than not getting raises and being upset with his pay does he like the job? Is he really happy there otherwise? If not, it's time for him to move on.

If he is happy, he should approach his boss and say "hey, I noticed this new person has this title and I've been working here very hard for four years and feel that I am a great contributor to the success of this team. I'd really like to advance in my career path here and wanted to know what we can do with that."

If they aren't willing to work with him then it's time for him to move on. He just needs to make sure to not burn any bridges.
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#3 macosxnerd101  Icon User is online

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Re: Promotions

Posted 15 February 2011 - 12:50 PM

Obviously the company doesn't appreciate this person. I'd advise him to discretely start looking for a job. Once he finds a couple positions elsewhere, he should talk to his supervisor, manager, boss, or whoever is responsible for a raise. If the boss doesn't want to cave, perhaps it's time for him to move onto a different company. If he can't find other job offers, however, I'd say perhaps stick it out for the moment. The economy is definitely turning around, but it's not there yet.
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#4 Craig328  Icon User is offline

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Re: Promotions

Posted 15 February 2011 - 01:20 PM

I'm kinda where Forced is at. Sometimes it's hard to toot your own horn but from time to time, it's necessary. It's a nice notion to think that hard, quality work will speak for you but the reality is oftentimes it doesn't. In fact, worse yet, people become accustomed to you doing so and then they might get the notion "we can't move that guy...the whole department would collapse without him doing what he does".

I think the discovery that a new hire has been elevated above him is a reasonable prompt for him to make an appointment with his boss to discuss his concerns. He needs to sit down in advance and catalog all the positive things he's done for the company (or continues to do), mention that his workload is that of a superior position and so he should be receiving the benefits of that position and he needs to look to see if any of the negative points raised in annual reviews (assuming he gets those) have been successfully addressed. It's almost like the way you approach an interview.

Even with all that, some employers worry about how he would do supervising (perhaps) employees who used to be his co-workers. That kind of thing can be very dicey with management so he needs to be aware of the possibility of that and be prepared to address it should they bring it up (if that's what he's looking to do).

Moral of the story is though: people can only take as much advantage of you as you let them. If he truly feels he's deserving of advancement then he needs to be the squeaky wheel. If his squeaks go unnoticed or are dismissed then indeed it's time for him to go find something else to do.
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#5 jjsaw5  Icon User is offline

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Re: Promotions

Posted 16 February 2011 - 05:30 AM

I gave him advice yesterday to schedule the meeting with his boss and approach it like it was his review. Find the next level job requirements and even the senior level and find examples of those requirements that he is currently doing on a daily bases and take those to his meetings to show his boss hard evidence.

I don't know if he plans on leaving the company if nothing is done, but i am on board with you guys in that if nothing is done about it I personally would start looking for another job and then once i have found a couple position have another talk with my boss and let him know i plan on leaving.

I think this is a tough situation for anyone to approach regardless of the situation. I think the best way to handle any situation like this is to get all the facts and be as prepared as possible. It's important to know what the next level above your requires so you can shot to do those things and make sure to notate them come review time.
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