What language to learn?

  • (2 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2

17 Replies - 3131 Views - Last Post: 26 March 2007 - 08:55 AM

#16 ByteWyse  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 6
  • View blog
  • Posts: 41
  • Joined: 02-January 07

Re: What language to learn?

Posted 09 January 2007 - 08:12 PM

I'll throw my two cents in for Python as well. While most of my life is spent in C++, Python is great for a lot of tasks.

There's a lot of material available for free on the web, it's a "real" language, and the interpreter and libraries are free.

There's also a lot of advantages for learning an interpreted language as your first language. Compiled languages add complications which get in the way of learning.

Enjoy.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#17 Amadeus  Icon User is offline

  • g+ + -o drink whiskey.cpp
  • member icon

Reputation: 248
  • View blog
  • Posts: 13,507
  • Joined: 12-July 02

Re: What language to learn?

Posted 09 January 2007 - 08:26 PM

View PostBetaWar, on 9 Jan, 2007 - 08:38 PM, said:

After never using them much I moved to PHP, which introduced me to classes and a more C++ feel to coding, after all I believe it is based on C++ (maybe not though).

Close - php was originally written as a set of CGI binaries in C, not C++.


View PostByteWyse, on 9 Jan, 2007 - 10:12 PM, said:

There's also a lot of advantages for learning an interpreted language as your first language. Compiled languages add complications which get in the way of learning.

Enjoy.

Compiled languages do have some more intricacies to them, but are also usually more conducive to learning a structured approach to programming - not simply the how's, but the why's as well.

Python is a good choice to begin with, as are any of the languages suggested. Python and some other interpreted languages do offer some forgiveness while learning, but can also fail to place a proper emphasis on some of the basics. Python uses duck typing, and some of the other interpreted languages are just weakly typed, which can lead to a less than full understanding of how variable types and the limits they are subjected to can effect applications, and the operations that are performed using the variables in question.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#18 ajwsurfer  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Regular
  • member icon

Reputation: 21
  • View blog
  • Posts: 373
  • Joined: 24-October 06

Re: What language to learn?

Posted 26 March 2007 - 08:55 AM

I am very greatful I learned C first. It gave me a real solid understanding of computer programming. Now whenever I am introduced to a new programming language I can grasp the concepts of it, and start writing programs quickly.

So my imediate next step after mastering C was to move on to Object Oriented Programming in C++ where I could really develop a solid understanding of classes and data structures. This is a solid foundation that I can always fall back on.

As Skyhawk stated originaly, HTML is not a programming language. I want to add that HTML was originated from what the poor secretaries where totured with, way back when, in the 60s, 70s and early 80s, when they had to format documents to make them print correctly. HTML simply is used to format documents to get them to display correctly in browsers, which are extreemly popular. This popularity gaurentees that we will continue to be tourtured with HTML for at least a good part of the near future.

The new data exchange format that is excptionaly complex, lucrative and dynamic, not to mention extensble, is XML (Extensible Markup Language).

XML still needs to be converted to HTML using XSLT(Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations) in order to be displayed correctly in a browser. The XSL processor still needs a XSL template which is a mix of HTML and XML, along with a DTD (Document Type Definition) which is another simple XML document to get its job done. The reason for this transformation is that a computer can generate dynamic XML data, which the XSL processor can used to generated (you guessed it) dynamic HTML content. This extra processing step allows the XML data to be placed into a range of data exchange protocols; WML, pdf, RSS and just plain old XML. There may be others that I am unaware of. XML is used for a wide range of purposes, some of them include providing data to be converted to HTML, but it has shown up in a wide range of other areas of computing and networking.

This post has been edited by ajwsurfer: 30 April 2007 - 09:07 AM

Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

  • (2 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2