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Beginner HTML5: Semantics -Part 1 Rate Topic: ****- 3 Votes

#1 Vip3rousmango  Icon User is offline

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Posted 11 April 2011 - 04:44 PM

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Beginner HTML5:
Semantics: Part 1



Introduction

Welcome to the Beginner HTML5 tutorial part 1! In this tutorial I'm going to cover some of the new updates and changes made to the HTML specification with version 5.

Although not officially ready for release by the W3C, we can still have some fun using some of the new elements.

In part 2 I will go over HTML5 Content Models and the proper way to use some of the new elements introduced here in part 1.

***NOTE: This tutorial although beginner in scope, does assume you have some knowlege of HTML4, or XHTML. Either way, a little understanding will help comprehend some of the changes/updates that HTML5 is featuring. I also breifly touch on some microformats and how HTML5 applies to them but you don't need to know about them as they arn't totally relevant for the scope of this tutorial but maybe a google search couldn't help? END NOTE***

So, what's the deal with HTML5?


Theirs going to be some new players in town besides our span, em, abbr, strong, et al. Not too many, nothing someone couldn't handle. Except now we don't call them "inline" anymore, instead they describe "text-level semantics". Catchy, I know. So lets meet some of the new guys and check out what they bring to the web designer's markup. Their are four that are more used than others:

Element 1: mark -he's a good friend!

I don't know about you all personally, but I use Google all the time. While searching you'll often see your searched term highlighted within results. To do this you could mark up every instance of the search term with a span element, but spans hold no semantic value. Their great for when you need to drop in those hidden classes, or put a wedge between some div's, but not here. You could even use em or strong but all of these wouldn't be semantically correct. You don't want to place any importance on the search term, just emphasise its location relative on the page so you can find it.

Tada! Enter, the mark element:
<h1>Search results for 'magical'</h1>
<ol>
   <li><a href="http://faireytales.com/">
      Riding the <mark>magical</mark> unicorn across the rainbow of the internet.</a></li>
</ol>


The mark element doesn't attach any importance to the content within the tags, other than to show that it's currently selected. HTML5 Spec says: mark element "denotes a run of text in one document marked or highlighted for reference purposes, due to its relevance in another context." You could use mark element in contexts other than search results to achieve a highlighting effect, but examples off the top of my head, I got nothing.. Oh! You could... Naw, just kidding.

Element 2: time -never enough of you!


hCalendar is among the most popular microformats because it provides an invaluable resource for marking up events so that users can add them straight to their calendars. Oh yeah, the good stuff. The only annoying part with hCalendar is describing dates and times in a machine-readable way. I like to describe dates as "May 20th" or "next Friday" but parsers expect ISO date format: YYYY-MM-DDThh:mm:ss. Talk about ugly and annoying to write each time.

Using HTML5, insert the time element instead:
<time datetime="1902-01-13">
   January 13th, 1902
</time>


The time element can be used for dates, times, or combinations of both:
<time datetime="17:00">5pm</time>
<time datetime="2011-04-07">April 7th</time>
<time datetime="2011-04-07T17:00">5pm on April 7th</time>


You don't have to put the datetime value inside the datetime attribute but you then must expose the value to the end user:
<time>2011-04-07</time>


Element 3: meter -how do you stack up?

The meter element is for markup of measurements and only if those measurements are part of a scale with minimum and maximum values.
<meter>9 out of 10 cats</meter>

You don't have to expose the maximum value. You can use the max attribute instead:
<meter max="10">9 cats</meter>


There's a min attribute as well as: high, low and optimum attributes too. If you want, you can even hide the measurement itself inside a value attribute:
<meter low="-273" high="100" min="12" max="30" optimum="21" value="25">
It's quite warm for this time of year for 25 degrees!
</meter>



Element 4: progress -we're making some right now!

The progress element allows you to markup a value that is "in the process of changing", which on the internet is a lot of items:
Your profile is <progress>60%</progress> complete.

Once again like meter element, you have min, max and value attributes if you want to use them:
<progress min="0" max="100" value="60'></progress>


The progress element is most useful when used with DOM Scripting. If you're feeling frosty can use Javascript to dynamically update the value, allowing the browser to communicate that change to the user. Awesome for Ajax file uploaders, loaders in general, profile creation bars, status bars I think you get the idea...

Semantic Changes

Google, in 2005, did some research to find out what common names web developers were giving inside their markup. An awesome uber parser looked at over a billion web pages and calculated the most common class names. The results...didn't shock anyone. Class names such as "header," "footer," and "nav" were among the highest charted.

These overused semantics allow for a nicely crafted segway to the new structural elements introduced in HTML5.

Semantic Element 1: section

In a nutshell, the section element is used for grouping together "contextually-releated content". Hold up, yes I know we have div elements but listen, the major difference is that a div element has no semantic meaning at all! None! It doesn't tell you anything about the content its holding unless you give it a clever ID (like "main_content" or something...) but even then this is only for us humans, not a web browser. So, the section element is used explicity for grouping related content, and is more semantically correct than just a plan div. You might be able to replace SOME of your div elements with section elements, but remember to ask yourself, "Is all of the content related?":
<section>
   <h1>Intro to HTML5</h1>
     <p>It's what you're learning, RIGHT NOW! In book format.</p>
     <p>By Another McGuy</p>
</section>



Semantic Element 2: header

The HTML5 specification describes a header element as the container for "a group of introductory or navigational aids." Sure, why not right? Usually the logo/site text and main navigation are always somewhere within a header but there is a critical difference between the header element in HTML5 and the generally accepted use of the word "header." In previous versions of HTML and XHMTL you only see one header on a page, but a document can have multiple header elements. You can use the header element within our new section element, for example:
<section>
   <header>
      <h1>Intro to HTML5</h1>
   </header>
     <p>It's what you're learning, RIGHT NOW! In book format.</p>
     <p>By Another McGuy</p>
</section>


A header will usually appear at the top of a document or section since you want a header for your site, but it doesn't have to. It is defined by its content-introductory or navigational aids-rather than its position on the page.

Semantic Element 3: footer

Like the header element, footer sounds like it's a description of position but, this isn't the case either. The footer element should contain information about its containing element: who wrote it, copywrite information, links to related content, etc. Again though, like with header above, the difference with our HTML5 footer element is that we are used to usually having one footer for an entire document, HTML5 allows us to have multiple by placing footers within a section.
<section>
   <header>
      <h1>Intro to HTML5</h1>
   </header>
     <p>It's what you're learning, RIGHT NOW! In book format.</p>
   <footer>
     <p>By Another McGuy</p>
   </footer>
</section>



Semantic Element 4: aside

Just as the footer element matches the concept of something which usually migrates to the bottom of a page, the aside element matches the concept of a sidebar. But, I'm not referring to position. Just because some content appears to the left or right of the main content isn't enough to use the aside element. Once again, its the content that matters not position. Think of it more of an "aside" from English class. A character in a story would have an "aside" in his head about the current context which only the character (and reader) would know about. Like having a conversation with someone and while they're talking, you're thinking to yourself: Wow, this guy is a jerk!. That, is an aside... from english class. So how does this relate?

The aside element should be used for contextually related content. If you have a chunk of content that you consider to be separate from the main content (our "jerk" statement), then the aside element is probably the right container for it. Ask yourself if the content within an aside could be removed without reducing the comprehension of the main content of the doucment or section (if you didn't think about the talking man being a jerk, does that change what he's telling you at all?).
The answer is no, it shouldn't.
<section>
   <header>
      <h1>Intro to HTML5</h1>
   </header>
     <p>It's what you're learning, RIGHT NOW! In book format.</p>
   <footer>
     <p>By Another McGuy</p>
   </footer>
<aside>
   <blockquote>
       "This book was so awesome! It helped me learn the in's and out's of HTML5 without too much fuss!
       I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn HTML5!" -Another Dudeostopoilous
   </blockquote>
</aside>
</section>


The blockquote here is a good example of related content. Like the jerk comment above you can remove the quote without affecting the comprehension of the main content. So, aside = NOT A SIDEBAR, you don't usually put quotes or a "Comment Now" box in a sidebar, do you? I didn't think so unless it's some crazy design for some "amazing" clients. It's common on blogs and some forums to place an author bio in a sidebar but that kind of data is best suited to the shiney new footer element- the HTML5 specification explicitly states "authorship information" as footer element material. So please, make the connection happen and help poor footer element out.

But Google's parser information didn't lie, you should be ecountering websites that, a majority of the time, use a header for the top, footer for the bottom, and sections all around with relevent content inside. But then their are other sites which do not. Watch out for them! They will turn you towards the semantic dark side...

and in this case, it's totally not cooler. I swear.

Semantic Element 5: nav

The nav element does exactly what you think it does. SURPRISE! It contains navigation information, usually in the form of styled unorderd lists I hope. Actually, I should state that the nav element is intended for "major navigational information" like the main site's navigation. Just because a group of links are grouped together in a list isn't enough reason to use nav. If I see this, I will hunt you down.

Quite often, a nav element will appear within a header element. That makes sense when you consider that the header element can be used for "navigational aids." So don't freak if you see this.

Semantic Element 6: article


I like to think of header, footer, nav and aside as being underling forms of the section element. A section is any amount of related content, while headers, footers, navs, and asides are chunks of specific kinds of related content which could be inside a section. The article element is a specialized kind of section. Use it for "self-contained related content." The hard part is figuring out what exactly constitutes "self-contained." Don't worry, its not confusing, ask yourself if you would syndicate the content in an RSS or Atom feed. This is a good indicator. If the content still makes sense standing on its own without the help of the main content to fill in the who,what,why,when,where.. and how, then article element is probably the right element to use. In fact, the article element is specifically designed for syndication! Thank you HTML5 Spec.

If you use a time element within an article, you can add the optional pubdate Boolean attribute to show that it contains the date of our publication:
<article>
   <header>
      <h1>Intro to HTML5</h1>
   </header>
     <p>It's what you're learning, RIGHT NOW! In book format.</p>
   <footer>
      <p>Published
        <time datetime="2011-04-11T20:10" pubdate>
        8:10pm on April 11th, 2011
        </time>
      <p>By Another McGuy</p>
   </footer>
</article>


If you have more than one time element inside an article, you can only use the pubdate attribute ONCE, remember that markup Jedi.

The article element is useful for blog posts, news stories, comments, reviews, and forum posts as well and it also covers exactly the same useage cases as hAtom microformat which is a nice benefit.

If you actually take the time to read the massive volume which is the full HTML5 specification it will tell you the article element should also be used for self-contained widgets: stock tickers, calculators, clocks, weather widgets and other similar items.

When I hear smack-talk about HTML5 it's usally because everyone is confused about the difference between proper usage of article and section elements. All that seperates them is the word "self-contained." Deciding which element to use would be easy if there were some hard and fast rules. But alas, it's a grey zone. Designer's interpretation. You can have multiple articles within a section, you can have multiple sections within an article, you can nest sections in sections and articles within articles. Guess who get's to make the call about which to use when, properly.

The Wrap-Up

HTML5 gives us a new structural elements to bend to our design force and they're especially crafty if you're putting together a "good" website. You can now replace SOME of your div elements with more semantically precise structural elements but don't go crazy. I don't want to see div elements dissapear overnight! Don't swap all your div elements for shiny new HTML5 elements just for the sake if it. It should be semantically correct for the content you're marking up. They provide web browsers with a completely new way to understand your content. Not for you to say goodbye to our good friend div.

In part 2, I'll review some HTML5 Content Models and how to code some HTML5 markup properly using new elements we learned here and some that wern't covered. I hope you enjoyed this introduction into HTML5, happy coding!

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Replies To: Beginner HTML5: Semantics -Part 1

#2 Shane Hudson  Icon User is offline

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 09:12 AM

Blimey you really are a good writer aren't you! Brand new to the forum and 200 kudos already (hurrmph, more than me!).

This is yet another great tutorial, which people would be stupid not to read word by word. I follow the blogs and even the w3 documents very closely. So you can imagine how surprised I was to be reading a tutorial on Dream In Code where I actually learned quite a few new things.

Keep it going!

Shane

EDIT: Whoops, I read your join date as this year... but nope it is 2011 now!

This post has been edited by Shane Hudson: 12 April 2011 - 09:15 AM

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#3 Vip3rousmango  Icon User is offline

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 10:23 AM

View PostShane Hudson, on 12 April 2011 - 11:12 AM, said:

Blimey you really are a good writer aren't you! Brand new to the forum and 200 kudos already (hurrmph, more than me!).

This is yet another great tutorial, which people would be stupid not to read word by word. I follow the blogs and even the w3 documents very closely. So you can imagine how surprised I was to be reading a tutorial on Dream In Code where I actually learned quite a few new things.

Keep it going!

Shane

EDIT: Whoops, I read your join date as this year... but nope it is 2011 now!


Thanks for the praise! Part two is finished and is pending. Hopefully it will be released soon.

They actually have a "web designers' HTML5 Spec which is a much easier read as it takes out all the fluff for web browser developers so it's easier to get to the good stuff.
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