SSD vs. Standard Hard Drives in Macbook Pro?

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#1 Polofiesta  Icon User is offline

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SSD vs. Standard Hard Drives in Macbook Pro?

Posted 16 April 2011 - 11:39 PM

Hey, so I am looking to buy a Macbook pro very soon. I have a specific model I am going to get. The 15-inch model for $2,199. Now I am probably going to choose the 2.2 Ghz proccessor or is it worth it to go up to 2.3 Ghz? Then I will get 8GB of RAM. Now here is my real problem. Since there is this new technology with these Solid state drives. I want to know if it is worth it to go from 750GB standard 5400 rpm hard drive and switch to a 128GB SSD for $100 more. Now is that worth it? Here is what I am going to do with the laptop:
-Final Cut Pro and many external Plugins
-Visual Effects
-Computer Programming like developing games for iphone etc.
-Heavy rendering of files
-Photoshop
-Developing Websites
-Working on my bed and laptop will often be on my lap

Now i've done some research with these SSD's and it seems great as there are no moving parts. Does this increase reliability alot? Also since its going to be on my lap will it decrease the amount of heat produced? which will further increase reliability? It seems alot to sacrifice over 500gb of memory and adding $100 for a SSD that is only 128gb. Please give me your insights. Thank you!

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#2 no2pencil  Icon User is online

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Re: SSD vs. Standard Hard Drives in Macbook Pro?

Posted 17 April 2011 - 12:44 AM

View PostPolofiesta, on 17 April 2011 - 02:39 AM, said:

Now i've done some research with these SSD's and it seems great as there are no moving parts. Does this increase reliability alot? Also since its going to be on my lap will it decrease the amount of heat produced? which will further increase reliability? It seems alot to sacrifice over 500gb of memory and adding $100 for a SSD that is only 128gb. Please give me your insights. Thank you!

I have seen a lot of laptops come in for drive failure, so I would say absolutely! Going to an SSD will increase reliability. I don't think that there will be any difference in heat.
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#3 novacrazy  Icon User is offline

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Re: SSD vs. Standard Hard Drives in Macbook Pro?

Posted 12 May 2011 - 08:34 PM

First, if the CPU is the same type, then might as well go for the faster one, though it will run hotter. However, if the CPU is a different architecture, such as the Intel Core 2 Duo vs the Intel Core i5 or something, look up the specs on each and their benchmarks performance tests to choose. Some processors are better at some things than others, even if their clock rate is lower. Such as a modern Intel CPU type running at 2 GHz can be far more efficient and faster than the older Pentium 4 at 3.20 GHz, its just a different design, some work better.

Second, Solid State Storage is very durable, about as much as your average flash drive, however, drawbacks for that include more heat generation, less space(I can't do with any drive under 200 GB, I collect music), and slower read/write speeds sometimes. 5400 RPM drive is very fast, and you will experience read/write speeds up to 40 MB/s if not more. I have a 320 GB IDE ATA6 drive at 5400, and though its interface type is slower, it still reaches those speeds. If you really want the durability, get the cheapest hard drive preset, then simply buy another hard drive of your choice thats known for durability. I got my drive for 100 dollars flat, and I've had no problem with any damages, and I'm pretty mean to my computer sometimes :P

Anyways, feel free to ask more questions :)
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#4 (KHC)Shadow  Icon User is offline

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Re: SSD vs. Standard Hard Drives in Macbook Pro?

Posted 17 May 2011 - 03:57 PM

If you have some sort of backup mechanism such as a Time Capsule, I would absolutely keep the original hard drive, since you will need a fair amount of space for movie editing. However, if you are worried about losing data, go with the solid state. As for the upgrade in processor clock, I wouldn't bother. To be honest, you usually don't see a difference in performance. As the last poster said, clock rate and performance are not the same thing. I would rarely spend money to upgrade to a higher clock rate with the same processor. With the money you hopefully saved on not getting a SSD I would upgrade to a better processor model if possible.
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#5 giggly kisses  Icon User is offline

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Re: SSD vs. Standard Hard Drives in Macbook Pro?

Posted 17 May 2011 - 05:58 PM

View Postnovacrazy, on 12 May 2011 - 09:34 PM, said:

First, if the CPU is the same type, then might as well go for the faster one, though it will run hotter. However, if the CPU is a different architecture, such as the Intel Core 2 Duo vs the Intel Core i5 or something, look up the specs on each and their benchmarks performance tests to choose. Some processors are better at some things than others, even if their clock rate is lower. Such as a modern Intel CPU type running at 2 GHz can be far more efficient and faster than the older Pentium 4 at 3.20 GHz, its just a different design, some work better.

Second, Solid State Storage is very durable, about as much as your average flash drive, however, drawbacks for that include more heat generation, less space(I can't do with any drive under 200 GB, I collect music), and slower read/write speeds sometimes. 5400 RPM drive is very fast, and you will experience read/write speeds up to 40 MB/s if not more. I have a 320 GB IDE ATA6 drive at 5400, and though its interface type is slower, it still reaches those speeds. If you really want the durability, get the cheapest hard drive preset, then simply buy another hard drive of your choice thats known for durability. I got my drive for 100 dollars flat, and I've had no problem with any damages, and I'm pretty mean to my computer sometimes :P

Anyways, feel free to ask more questions :)


Sorry but a lot of your information is very incorrect. For one SSD's do not create more heat, they actually produce less, why would something with no moving parts create more heat then a drive with moving parts? 5400 drives are actually really slow, 7200 rpm drives are standard now and 10,000 rpm drives are fast... I'm guessing by IDE ATA6 you mean SATA 6Gbps, if so then that is corrently the fastest interface for drives right now. It doesn't matter what interface the drive is using its still going to spin at its rated speed, the interface just means how much data can be sent from the drive to the south bridge. So you're telling him if he wants a quality product he should buy the cheapest one? Not really following the logic there.

Ok OP to answer your question SSD's are much more reliable then HDDs since they don't have moving parts therefore don't really degrade over time. I say don't really because the NAND transistors in them do have a limit on how many times they can be written to. The good news is most people won't ever write to their SSDs enough to kill it that way, the only people that have to worry are people running servers that are constantly being accessed. The main reason people use SSD's is for the speed advantages that you will see (and believe me you will notice it) Right now I have a C300 SSD in my desktop as an OS drive and it destroys my Spin point F3's (which are 7200 rpm SATA 3Gbps drives). My C300 gets about 370 MB/s sequental reads and 73 MB/s sequental writes. A normal HDD gets about 140 MB/s reads and 90 MB/s writes. For random access I get around 30 MB/s read and 54 MB/s writes. A HDD gets less then 1 MB/s reads and writes. The main place where the SSD shines is latencies as it doesn't have to wait for a disk to spin to get to the data that it needs to reads it has very quick access latencies. I wouldn't go with Apples SSD's as they don't use the highest quality ones. I would go with a 3rd party drive that has some nice garbage collection (especially since OSX doesn't support TRIM yet) so your drive doesn't slow down when you start to fill it up.

As for the 2.2 vs 2.3 you will hardly see the difference between 1000Mhz, save the money and get a nice SSD.
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#6 novacrazy  Icon User is offline

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Re: SSD vs. Standard Hard Drives in Macbook Pro?

Posted 17 May 2011 - 06:00 PM

No, I do not mean SATA, my tech is earlier than that, do some research. Also, if no moving parts means less heat, then remove your heatsink from your CPU.
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#7 giggly kisses  Icon User is offline

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Re: SSD vs. Standard Hard Drives in Macbook Pro?

Posted 17 May 2011 - 06:09 PM

View Postnovacrazy, on 17 May 2011 - 07:00 PM, said:

No, I do not mean SATA, my tech is earlier than that, do some research. Also, if no moving parts means less heat, then remove your heatsink from your CPU.


Ok the way you phrased it was a bit weird. Dude, you're not making any sense, the heat sink isn't part of your CPU the CPU it's self doesn't have moving parts. SSD's use less heat then HDDs because they use less power (since they don't have to use moving parts!) If you don't believe me read this...Maybe you should be doing some research, huh?

http://www.tomshardw.../253029-32-heat
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#8 novacrazy  Icon User is offline

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Re: SSD vs. Standard Hard Drives in Macbook Pro?

Posted 17 May 2011 - 06:17 PM

View Postgiggly kisses, on 17 May 2011 - 07:09 PM, said:

View Postnovacrazy, on 17 May 2011 - 07:00 PM, said:

No, I do not mean SATA, my tech is earlier than that, do some research. Also, if no moving parts means less heat, then remove your heatsink from your CPU.


Ok the way you phrased it was a bit weird. Dude, you're not making any sense, the heat sink isn't part of your CPU the CPU it's self doesn't have moving parts. SSD's use less heat then HDDs because they use less power (since they don't have to use moving parts!) If you don't believe me read this...Maybe you should be doing some research, huh?

http://www.tomshardw.../253029-32-heat

SSD's use the exact some tech as flash memory, and I actually know the CMOS tech behind that. Regular HDD's are still one or two generations ahead of SSD's, and are far cheaper for more memory. Some, not all, SSD's are fast, however they are generally the smaller ones. SSD's and HDD's also can use about the same power when running at full speed. The amount of power they draw really doesn't convert very well to the amount of heat they output either, because in at least external SSD's, they have small fans inside of them. Why would it need a fan if it doesn't produce much heat? Also, btw, my drive works perfectly fine for me, 5400 RPM is good enough, my original was only 4200 RPM, so yeah. HDD's still provide much cheaper memory in higher amounts and modern HDD's don't put out much more heat than anything else. Most of the power in a laptop is still drawn by the screen, so HDD or SSD, it doesn't really matter as far as power.
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#9 giggly kisses  Icon User is offline

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Re: SSD vs. Standard Hard Drives in Macbook Pro?

Posted 17 May 2011 - 06:39 PM

HDD's are much more generations ahead of SSDs but the technology has hit a wall. The only way of speeding up a HDD is by making it rotate faster which will use more power, noise and create more heat. The latest generation of SSD's and the last one even are exteremly fast (anything that uses a sandforce or indilinx controller are quick). The thing that makes a SSD fast is the controller it uses, not the size. Sorry but heat is directly related to the amount of power being used, power creates heat. I've never seen or heard of a SSD with a fan in it. Sure 5400 rpm may be nice for you but it's not the case for everyone. I have a 5400 rpm drive in my mac and its really starting to show its age. Why have a 5400 rpm drive when you could get a 7200 drive, especially since the HDD is the biggest bottleneck in any system.

Here is a site you might want to read:
http://elitepcbuilding.com/ssd-vs-hdd

It says HDD produce 3 times more heat then a SSD (granted they don't produce much but in a laptop it makes a difference). Sure most of the power is drawn from the screen but again in a laptop every watt counts. Also HDD's don't provide memory, they provide storage (secondary storage) space. Ram provides memory (primary storage).
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#10 calvinthedestroyer  Icon User is offline

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Re: SSD vs. Standard Hard Drives in Macbook Pro?

Posted 21 May 2011 - 10:02 PM

It's going to come down to individual brand. We have ssd drives at work and they produce no heat at all but I can't say that for every make or brand. You will just have to try it and see.

I've seen the same in hard drive, some run hot, some run cold and others just make a kakunk kakunk noise.

If your going to be pushing the GPU with video editing then I would suggest getting a laptop cooler to help keep the heat down. The GPU's can get hot
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#11 WinkyCode  Icon User is offline

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Re: SSD vs. Standard Hard Drives in Macbook Pro?

Posted 21 May 2011 - 10:43 PM

On the question over the system for storage, that is, a standard mechanical harddrive or a SSD harddrive, my concern is security :gunsmilie: .

The problem with SSD is that it is yet hard to erase the drive from personal information. It is a security issue.

My sources:
http://www.computerw...urprise_Experts
and
http://nvsl.ucsd.edu/sanitize/

on the note of raw power for the laptop, why do you not choose a desktop :dontgetit: ?
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#12 iniaes  Icon User is offline

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Re: SSD vs. Standard Hard Drives in Macbook Pro?

Posted 21 May 2011 - 11:50 PM

A ssd will enable you to make the most of future thunder port IO accessories too, such as external storage and additional screens. In my experience ssds produce about the same heat when under load from intensive programmed such as image and video manipulation software or high spec games, but no noise :) If you are happy to sacrifice the internal storage space for speed then go for it, you can pick up USB powered hdd at a TB for~$150 or 90. That should suffice. . :)

Hope this helps.

This post has been edited by iniaes: 21 May 2011 - 11:55 PM

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#13 Polofiesta  Icon User is offline

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Re: SSD vs. Standard Hard Drives in Macbook Pro?

Posted 25 May 2011 - 02:11 PM

View PostWinkyCode, on 21 May 2011 - 10:43 PM, said:

On the question over the system for storage, that is, a standard mechanical harddrive or a SSD harddrive, my concern is security :gunsmilie: .

The problem with SSD is that it is yet hard to erase the drive from personal information. It is a security issue.

My sources:
http://www.computerw...urprise_Experts
and
http://nvsl.ucsd.edu/sanitize/

on the note of raw power for the laptop, why do you not choose a desktop :dontgetit: ?

I need it to be mobile. The computer is mainly for programming software and websites. The film aspect is not to important to me that much. As if I am really into film then I will buy myself a film devoted computer. I decided to go with a standard hard drive but which one is more suited the 5400rpm or 7200rpm?
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#14 WinkyCode  Icon User is offline

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Re: SSD vs. Standard Hard Drives in Macbook Pro?

Posted 27 May 2011 - 11:57 PM

View PostPolofiesta, on 25 May 2011 - 02:11 PM, said:

View PostWinkyCode, on 21 May 2011 - 10:43 PM, said:

On the question over the system for storage, that is, a standard mechanical harddrive or a SSD harddrive, my concern is security :gunsmilie: .

The problem with SSD is that it is yet hard to erase the drive from personal information. It is a security issue.

My sources:
http://www.computerw...urprise_Experts
and
http://nvsl.ucsd.edu/sanitize/

on the note of raw power for the laptop, why do you not choose a desktop :dontgetit: ?

I need it to be mobile. The computer is mainly for programming software and websites. The film aspect is not to important to me that much. As if I am really into film then I will buy myself a film devoted computer. I decided to go with a standard hard drive but which one is more suited the 5400rpm or 7200rpm?


OK, mobile it is. If you are going to "just" program on it, the difference is not that great. To my experience, it is a couple of seconds faster with a 7200 RPM drive rather then a 5400 RPM drive. And that is only if everything is optimized. The OS, the current I.E you must be plugged to a wall and so on.

My advice is to buy a large 5400 RPM drive with a capacity of 0,5 TB or greater. They are not that expansive now days. Around 100 to 150 US $ last I checked my local supplier. Then again, if you just want Apple and Apple techie working on it, you must pay a whole lot more.

D.I.Y. (Do It Yourself = D.I.Y.) on a laptop is not that hard. You just need to have patience and a ESD-pad with an wrist-thingy (look at this picture: http://www.unitedesd.com/ESD_Wr16.jpg - don't know what it is called in English). And of course screwdrivers and such. But most of all, patience. And a manual don't hurt :) .

Good luck! And please post whatever you decide and the outcome like if you are happy or why are not!
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#15 giggly kisses  Icon User is offline

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Re: SSD vs. Standard Hard Drives in Macbook Pro?

Posted 04 June 2011 - 02:12 PM

i forgot to mention this when I was posting but I'm throwing a new HDD in my macbook and I'm going with this drive:

http://www.newegg.co...8-591-_-Product

Its a hybrid SSD and HDD. It has 8gb's of SSD storage space and 500 gb's HDD space. It uses the SSD storage to cache the programs that you use the most and transfers its data over to that portion so the next time you run the program it's instant. Only a $100 on the egg!
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