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#1 Dogstopper  Icon User is offline

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Build for Android or iOS? There's no need to choose - JavaWorld

Post icon  Posted 24 April 2011 - 11:47 AM

http://www.javaworld...en-sources.html

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A high-profile VC and a well-known mobile application developer were recently involved in a debate about whether to build for Android or Apple mobile platforms. The answer, it turns out: "it depends," "both," or "simply build for the mobile browser." The third answer is the correct one for most developers.


This article makes a big deal out of the idea of cross platform. I totally agree with the article that the web is the way to go in MOST mobile devices these days. With careful web coding and browser optimizations, it could be as fast as a native application could be.

Thoughts?

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Replies To: Build for Android or iOS? There's no need to choose - JavaWorld

#2 Sergio Tapia  Icon User is offline

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Re: Build for Android or iOS? There's no need to choose - JavaWorld

Posted 24 April 2011 - 12:06 PM

My thoughts are what happens when one provider decides to squat down on a technology and ban it's use. If you were using such a technology you would be in a creek without a paddle. For example, flash with apple devices. Another example, Unity on apple devices.

Unity was supposed to provide a one-size-fits-all approach to game development but Apple at one point got extremely close to barring it's use. Currently I don't know what the outcome of that was, but I do remember the storm that rose because of it.

I say if you want to really benefit your customers you should tailer your application to fit in with the native look and feel of the device.

A clear example, if you were to run an application built with Swift or whatever Java GUI framework, you can tell immediately and it definitely takes off polish points for me. .NET being native, can create applications that look and feel like they belong. Just like Cocoa can make Mac applications that look that they fit with their ecosystem.

Sometimes these one-size-fits-all frameworks are just crummy and make your application look like an afterthought to cover the most bases possible.
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#3 Core  Icon User is offline

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Re: Build for Android or iOS? There's no need to choose - JavaWorld

Posted 24 April 2011 - 12:11 PM

Not really. Web applications are only able to scratch the surface on most mobile devices. Think about the native APIs, like sensors or storage units. That cannot be directly controlled by a web application. Due to the platform differences, it is practically unreasonable to try and implement those hooks in a application that runs from the browser.
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#4 MATTtheSEAHAWK  Icon User is offline

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Re: Build for Android or iOS? There's no need to choose - JavaWorld

Posted 24 April 2011 - 08:40 PM

View PostCore, on 24 April 2011 - 03:11 PM, said:

Not really. Web applications are only able to scratch the surface on most mobile devices. Think about the native APIs, like sensors or storage units. That cannot be directly controlled by a web application. Due to the platform differences, it is practically unreasonable to try and implement those hooks in a application that runs from the browser.


I have reached my rep quota for the day but I agree with you. They can run anywhere but they can't use near as much potential as the device has if they are on the web. I think it is just a good idea to code for both. It may take a lot more time and knowledge but you can use the full potential of any device.
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#5 skorned  Icon User is offline

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Re: Build for Android or iOS? There's no need to choose - JavaWorld

Posted 25 April 2011 - 09:21 AM

Has anyone tried any of these: [http://maniacdev.com]. I haven't, but they seem to answer this very problem. Write in a universal format of html, css and javascript, but have access to native APIs. Phonegap seems especially worthwhile, it gives you a lot more than just Android and iOS (maybe others do too, I haven't really checked), and its got a beautiful website... And afaik, they're free to use, and charge only for support. I was planning to experiment with developing for the blackberry, I might try both the native SDK and PhoneGap before settling for one.
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#6 Core  Icon User is offline

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Re: Build for Android or iOS? There's no need to choose - JavaWorld

Posted 25 April 2011 - 09:38 AM

With the help of the framework you mention the developer still builds an application package that is submitted to the app marketplace. The only difference is that HTML5 and Javascript are used as the foundation for it - there is still an intermediary layer that makes platform call invokations. It's a different story when a web app is opened directly in the browser. But yes, these frameworks make it a bit easier to develop cross-platform apps (although with limitations due to platform compromises).
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#7 skorned  Icon User is offline

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Re: Build for Android or iOS? There's no need to choose - JavaWorld

Posted 25 April 2011 - 10:48 AM

Core, yeah, that's whats great about these frameworks. Write once, run anywhere. So you write it in platform independent HTML and JS, and it automatically packs it in with the native APIs to make it run as a native app.
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#8 diabeticyborg  Icon User is offline

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Re: Build for Android or iOS? There's no need to choose - JavaWorld

Posted 25 April 2011 - 06:09 PM

I've never dev'd for either platform, but I plan on working on an Android application this summer.

From a user's point of view, the web-based app is still lacking. Take Google Reader for example. The website was slow and there was something off about the UI(I can't remember what exactly, I'm talking from memory). Then, Google released a native app and it was quick. Furthermore, even though it shared a similar interface to the mobile site, it felt right and was a pleasurable user-experience. Lastly, and I'm sure there is a code solution for this, having the icon in you application drawer is a lot nicer. Unfortunately, a Google Reader favorite icon on the desktop just doesn't cut the mustard.
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#9 mi14chal  Icon User is offline

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Re: Build for Android or iOS? There's no need to choose - JavaWorld

Posted 30 April 2011 - 02:52 AM

I've found nice blog entry describing differences between native app and web app http://mkblog.exadel...ps-vs-web-apps/
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#10 Nick johnson  Icon User is offline

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Re: Build for Android or iOS? There's no need to choose - JavaWorld

Posted 14 August 2012 - 03:14 AM

Its nice that Java is not the only language in which android app can be made.......
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