Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

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#1 Sethro117  Icon User is offline

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Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

Posted 30 April 2011 - 10:09 AM

With the prices of gas increasing as well as everything else with this state of economy do you think more companies will come to realise and start implementing telecommute employees as the standard or do you think they'll stick to the tried and true office? What about outsourcing? In our field outsourcing is a common thing I think we will see it increase substantially if things continue the way their going. Even though most people on here say you get what you pay for, do you think companies really look at the big picture as far as coding standards, IT practices or do they only want to save money and as long as it works everythings ok?

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Replies To: Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

#2 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

Posted 30 April 2011 - 10:26 AM

The price of gas this, price of gas that.

Assume an average of 20mpg. Those with trucks get less, those with econo-cars more.
Assume a spike of .40 a gallon.
The fed says the average driver drives 12000mi/year. So a 1,000 mi/month.
But only half of that is commuting to/from work.
1,000miles / 20mpg = 500 gallons a month
So a big .40 spike would be an extra $200 month: $100/month is for commuting for work.

$100 is less that a lot of folks spend on their monthly Starbucks habit. or their lunches out.

I don't think most companies are going to change a lot because of a $100/month expense out of their employee's wallets. Sad, but most just don't care enough and will make it the employees' problem.
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#3 Sethro117  Icon User is offline

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Re: Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

Posted 30 April 2011 - 10:59 AM

I think you forgot to read the rest of the post. Yes, I mentioned gas first but everything is increasing which means resources and goods businesses buy are increasing. Material shipment is increasing which takes, would you look at that!? Gas. Those costs will be passed down to the business and they will in turn have to look at ways to reduce costs. Many companies can cut an employees pay for working from home, which would reduce costs or they could outsource to another country and fire everyone which again would reduce costs.

You missed the point because even though yes, employees have to pay for gas too everything the company orders, ships, or whatever, the cost will keep increasing.
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#4 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

Posted 30 April 2011 - 11:47 AM

Its not so much that I didn't read it, but that it really isn't anything new.
The cost of everything is going up. Yeah. Welcome to the world. When I learned to drive gas was .85/gallon and milk around the same price. My father bought a 3 bd, 2bath ranch style house in Illinois for $40k and bitched like hell when he had to buy some new work trucks and spend nearly $10k for each of them. My 2009 RAM 1500 was $25k and my 2008 RAM 2500 was $35k.

Coffee was .35c for a bottomless cup of overperked brew. Now it's $3 for a tall black at Starbucks. Or $7 for a venti frappicino that I can make at home for $1.

It's called inflation. The cost of living is something that always goes up year after year, then salaries trail that.

By the same token, the cost of housing has done nothing but drop for the last few years. Driving costs you $200/month more. So groceries will cost you $75/month more. And a 2005 house at $250k now costs you $120k.

So when you say 'everything' is going up... no. The most expensive investment of your life, your home, is down by half. So what does that do to your cost of living calculations?
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#5 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

Posted 30 April 2011 - 12:03 PM

I always think it funny when people bitch about gas prices.
3 years ago when I was in Australia gas was 1.85 a LITRE.
3.72 L/gal
So AU$6.88/USgallon
Exchange rage was .9
So US$6.19/US gallon - three years ago.


Or you don't see riots over the cost of Pepto Bismal. $4 for a little bottle. So around $55/gallon.

I've watched milk go from 1.80/gal to 2.80/gallon in a week, then back down the next. Do you see picket lines for that? If gas did that people would loose their minds. Of course we don't go through 500 gallons a month of milk per household. Still, nobody seems to question the dairy industry for price fixing/gouging.

Personally, I would be happy paying $15/gallon for gasoline if someone opened up a chain of stations where the gas was 100% american drilled oil, 100% american processed, 100% american workers and all the money stayed inside the USA. They can call the chain "FU OPEC Inc." There'd be a ton less wasted driving and billions of dollars staying in our country that currently leaves to finance camel countries. Buy American: The job you save just might be your own.

Just maybe if we kept our money at home we could keep our people employed and there'd be less concern about standard rates of inflation.
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#6 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

Posted 30 April 2011 - 01:13 PM

I would like to see the stations catching up with the reality of prices though. Most stations pre-auth for up to $75. That won't fill up a tank these days. Every time I fill up I have to do it in two transactions, pull the nozzle out of the tank and put it back in the pump etc. Would it be that tough on today's computerized pumps to ask someone how much they want to pre-authorize for?

Spoiler

This post has been edited by tlhIn`toq: 30 April 2011 - 01:15 PM

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#7 Sergio Tapia  Icon User is offline

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Re: Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

Posted 30 April 2011 - 04:36 PM

I pay 5.04 Bolivianos (~$0.70) a liter! Jealous! hahahah :lol: Gotta love that government subsidy. I even hear that Venezuelans have it even CHEAPER.

This post has been edited by Sergio Tapia: 30 April 2011 - 04:37 PM

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#8 no2pencil  Icon User is online

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Re: Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

Posted 30 April 2011 - 05:58 PM

View PosttlhIn`toq, on 30 April 2011 - 01:26 PM, said:

The price of gas this, price of gas that.

For people that don't make seven figures, dumping near $100 just to get from point a to point b for a week sucks. Thus it's a topic on everyones mind.

I know the girlfriend is looking for another job because the commute is getting too expensive compared to what it brings in.
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#9 nooblet  Icon User is offline

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Re: Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

Posted 01 May 2011 - 03:10 AM

Take this with a grain of salt as it mostly applies to me and my personal opinion but there are very few things I would outsource or allow telecommuting for (extremely rare and low). Almost 100% of the time I will require local office with people coming in most of the time if not all the time. In my experience, and I have tried this SEVERAL times in my life, things just don't accelerate quite as fast or flow well at all. Perhaps in a large corporate environment, these things don't tend to be big issues, but in a startup (which is practically what I've done for most of my life), not having someone you can communicate with on the fly and in person is detrimental. This is true for the majority of the startups in the Valley as well. Can't speak for other areas.
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#10 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

Posted 01 May 2011 - 06:00 AM

View Postno2pencil, on 30 April 2011 - 06:58 PM, said:

View PosttlhIn`toq, on 30 April 2011 - 01:26 PM, said:

The price of gas this, price of gas that.

For people that don't make seven figures, dumping near $100 just to get from point a to point b for a week sucks. Thus it's a topic on everyones mind.

I know the girlfriend is looking for another job because the commute is getting too expensive compared to what it brings in.


  • That's a valid response if your job involves the phrase "Do you want to biggie size that for 75 cents", but for adults with careers there is a need to adjust to inflation. Some people have to keep the job and change the residence. Its different for everyone's situation.


  • Kirstie Alley being on Dancing with the Stars is a topic that seems to be on everyone's mind along with a Royal Wedding in a country we broke away from. Just being on people's minds doesn't make it something meaningful, or something we can actually do anything about but talk.


  • I don't make 7 figures. I make $55k/yr. which is rather poor for our industry, I know. But I like the company and am guaranteed job as long as I want it. Which feels safer right now than jumping ship for a bigger check that could evaporate in 12 months.


I never said it {gas prices} didn't suck. I just accept that it is what it is. Its a part of the cost of living. Cell phones used to be $1,000 dollars. Now they are $49 and up. DVD players were over a grand when they came out. Now they are $25 at WalMart. Flatscreens used to be ten thousand. I just saw a 47" 3D LG for $1200. Gasoline is just one aspect of the cost of living.

And as I mentioned before, prices going up is nothing new. We've all been bitching about rising gas prices for the last 3 decades. I don't see how it is any different this year than last year than last decade. I remember everyone claiming "If gas ever hits $2 a gallon I'm going to sell my car." yeah right.

The prevailing attitude is "We're Americans. We all have our own cars and we drive them everywhere." There are lots of things people can do that they don't do. But so many people feel they are either too good to take a city bus, or wouldn't consider a bike or car pooling. Trip planning so you go to the store once a week instead of 3 times a week. Go shopping with your neighbor using only one car. Work a deal with the boss to work 4 x 10 hours instead of 5 x 8. You save an entire trip and have 3 day weekends. If you ride your bike to work then pick up 3 things each day instead of a 3 cart-fuls on Saturday. Keep the SUV, but buy a scooter for 75% of those trips that don't really require the full car. Walk to the 7-11 for those candy bars instead of driving: It might just be healthy for ya. Stop renting an apartment and buy a house: There's a glut of repos on the market for a song. Keep in mind that every rent check pays someone else's mortgage for them, plus profit.

Some people can even take more dramatic changes if they don't mind thinking outside the box a little. I rented out my house and moved into an RV. My cost of living instantly dropped in half when we accepted that my wife and I didn't really need a 4 bdrm for the two of us.

For Pete's sake Sergio Tapia changed countries for a better job, but we Americans bitch about an extra few cents a gallon for gasoline.

It wouldn't hurt more Americans to take a look at how people get around in Europe where gas is $7-9/gallon plus, for some ideas on adjusting to higher gas prices.

This post has been edited by tlhIn`toq: 01 May 2011 - 07:03 AM

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#11 Curtis Rutland  Icon User is online

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Re: Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

Posted 02 May 2011 - 09:10 AM

I'll say this about gas prices. I just filled up today for $3.86/gal. Not as expensive as some places in the US, but expensive nonetheless.

Inflation is one thing, but oil prices aren't always due to inflation. I bought my truck last June, and I remember gas was something like $2.60/gal (verified here). In about a year, we've seen gas prices rise by about 45%. There's a difference between the steady rise of the cost of everything vs sudden rises of the cost of gas like this.

So, I can see how this is a valid concern for even those who have real careers, depending on how much of their income is spent on transportation. When your cost of living raise is 3%, but your transportation budget increases by half, that could be a problem for some.

I'm personally not greatly affected. I live about a mile away from work, and am about to move even closer. My truck only gets 17 mpg highway, but I just don't drive that much. I take fewer trips to visit my family, but that's about it.

But to people that have to travel 20+ miles to work, this isn't a small expense.
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#12 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

Posted 02 May 2011 - 09:33 AM

Quote

Inflation is one thing, but oil prices aren't always due to inflation.


Very true. From what I'm hearing and reading the majority of oil price increases is due to larger numbers of investors. Ya know all those retirement funds that were based on home mortgage company returns and insurance funds? When they all tanked investors and fund managers looked elsewhere. Oil and other energy producers are considered a safe bet since the world is always going to need increasing amounts of energy.

Of course when thatbacteria that feeds on water and CO2 to produce petroleum like waste becomes approved and mainstream we can tell OPEC to kiss our American arses - which will cause the oil prices to plummet. And hopefully the sand-head will have nothing to keep them rich and collapse back into the dark ages (oh wait, they're still there).

This is why oil companies [A] Try to keep these technological developments from hitting the market or [B] Try to buy those technologies so they can shift their profits from drilling for oil to laboratory produced oil.
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#13 TomJoad  Icon User is offline

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Re: Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

Posted 02 May 2011 - 09:46 AM

That may be well and good for you, tlhIn`toq, but what about the other 80% of the population who makes less?
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#14 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

Posted 02 May 2011 - 10:38 AM

View PostTomJoad, on 02 May 2011 - 10:46 AM, said:

That may be well and good for you, tlhIn`toq, but what about the other 80% of the population who makes less?


I'm sorry... To which comment of mine are you referring? I've made several on this thread and your reply doesn't make any sense in context to the most recent message one, that it is following.

As for those that make less... I pointed out once already that I make middle-class wages that are below the norm for our industry and had to give up my house to live in an RV as a cost-cutting measure. But I feel attitude is a choice and I choose to not whine about it. I choose to look at the positive side of being mobile and able to see the country while I am young enough to hike trails. If I was so inclined, I could bitch about working for a company that wastes too much money in the wrong areas, lack of a raise for years followed by a mandatory cut in wages and loss of insurance. But I choose to be happy that I am still gainfully employed and putting food on the table.

There are absolutely people out there who make less than I do. But I don't claim to have the answers for every American in every situation. There are also people who live in cities like Chicago and New York who don't even own cars because they get along fine on subways and the metro bus. The fuel prices don't affect them as much as others, but the drop in housing costs certainly isn't hurting them.

I really only took the devil's advocate side of the discussion that fuel prices going up is nothing new, or that other prices have actually gone down.

But in general terms... I don't think I told anyone what they should do. I've only commented on my own opinions and stated several times that each person has their own unique situation that will require their own unique response. Along with some observations that there are a lot of ways to cut costs in other areas in order to make their end-of-month budget compensate for increased fuel costs, that many people don't always think of. For example: At $25/carton half of America can make up the fuel costs just by dropping their 2 pack a day addiction. If they choose to. If they choose not to, that is their choice to keep their lifestyle. I could choose to stop going to the movies, but instead I go to a theater where tickets are $2.75 each. I could choose to stop buying ammo or stop going to the gun range. Instead I found an on-line supplier to reduce my costs by buying in bulk.

But don't complain that you have no options because you feel no prices for anything should ever go up during your lifetime. That's the point I'm making. All prices for everything are going to go up every year. Some more or less than others. Some faster than others. Some unexpectedly due to major world factors like war or depression. But we all know it's going to happen. That is a certainty. We just don't know if it will be in 2011 or 2020. Whose fault is it if you don't accept that certainty and prepare for it?
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#15 TomJoad  Icon User is offline

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Re: Future of Telecommute and Outsourcing

Posted 03 May 2011 - 05:09 AM

I was referring to the majority of your posts wherein you basically state you need to be prepared for ever increasing costs, but at the same time state that costs go down. Where we should all buy homes so we aren't renting, etc.

However, the majority of American's do not have nearly the same luxury that you do. They cannot buy homes, they cannot save for the future, and are constantly one step away from financial ruin -- and homelessness. One in four American children live under the poverty line, which is far too low to accurately measure poverty. One in six Americans are given some sort of government aid just to keep them afloat. One in four of-age Americans has a credit score below 599. More than a quarter of all renters spend more than 50% of their income on housing costs alone. Of the bottom 90% of Americans, the average income is a mere $31,000; it takes a family of four over $35,000 just to make ends meet.

In the nation's capital, Ward 8 has an unemployment rate of 25%, with Ward 7 following closely behind with an unemployment rate of 17%.

Assuming your wife works and makes an average salary, your household is already better off than nearly 80% of the rest of the country.

Instead of telling people that they should be good, just accept it, and prepare like you have -- which is not feasible or remotely possible for nearly every American -- isn't the proper response to be outraged that 25% of our youth live in poverty, and demand better?
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