2 Replies - 690 Views - Last Post: 06 May 2011 - 08:14 PM

#1 thepowercoder  Icon User is offline

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Books on programming

Posted 06 May 2011 - 06:54 PM

I have been learning a lot about c# and was investing in starting a library of sorts of books that I will use both for reference and for tutelage. At the present, I find it extremely cost effective to go on Amazon.com and look through the used books. For instance, where C# in Visual Studio 2010 (Fictional Title Used for my example) may be $80.00 for the new book and $65.00 for the used one, C# in Visual Studio 2008 may be $25 new and $.01 used and you just pay for the shipping. So I have been investing in some of the previous versions of certain technologies. I have a couple questions about this. Do you feel that doing this causes me to miss out on important new concepts because I am investing in a book from the previous version of the language? I prefer to have written books because of the ability to flip quickly, highlight effectively, etc.

Second point: I noticed that there are book on certain topics like Programming in C# (Fictional name used for example) and then there is C# Reference. Should I buy a C# concept book AND a C# reference book or does my concept book stand as a reference? Thanks for any advice that you can give. ^_^

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Replies To: Books on programming

#2 Curtis Rutland  Icon User is offline

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Re: Books on programming

Posted 06 May 2011 - 07:36 PM

I'm going to move this to the C# Programmer's Lounge, since it's not really a help related question.

You might be interested in our Recommended C# Books thread.

As to your first question, I vastly prefer newer books, but I'm a sucker for new stuff. I try to use the newest versions of things whenever I can. But I understand about how you can save more by buying the previous editions used. I'd suggest trying to find current editions used if possible, since they're likely to teach the newest ways of doing things. If you can't, the farthest back I'd go is for .NET 3.5. That's when a lot of really good stuff got added, like LINQ and lambdas, and ASP.NET Ajax, etc...

To the second question, I'd say there's no harm in both. Reference books aren't like textbooks; they're references. Probably not intended to read cover to cover, but to find chapters on specific things you need to learn or refresh on. The other books are more focused on teaching you the language. If you had to choose, I'd go with the latter, but if you don't, get both. But read the teaching book first.
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#3 thepowercoder  Icon User is offline

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Re: Books on programming

Posted 06 May 2011 - 08:14 PM

Thank you very much for the informative reply. I definitely understand trying to get the latest and greatest if possible. I will keep in mind that the farthest back I should go is .NET 3.5. Thanks for the information.

This post has been edited by Curtis Rutland: 06 May 2011 - 08:34 PM

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