4 Replies - 867 Views - Last Post: 09 May 2011 - 08:35 AM

#1 novacrazy  Icon User is offline

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Job ideas

Posted 07 May 2011 - 03:08 PM

I don't know if this is the right forum to ask this, but what the hell... I'm 16 and the way things are going now it doesn't look like I can get a good college degree, don't ask why, sort of personal. However, I would still like to earn a living programming. I know I support open-source-ness and such, but I can't make a living off giving away code. So, I'm wondering what are my best options for getting a programming job are in the world, or for that matter if its possible to start my own business with my own code. I'm near expert level in some C++ things, but since I've taught myself, I missed out on a lot of "theory of programming" stuff. So, I'd like to know what sort I've things I'd need to learn. I managed to make a fairly working doubly linked list in two days based on just wikipedia articles, so I can learn it pretty easily. I need to know what to learn though... Eh, I'm rambling, I'm sorry, just sort of stressed... Any ideas or recommendations would be greatly appreciated, thank you for reading.

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Replies To: Job ideas

#2 KYA  Icon User is offline

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Re: Job ideas

Posted 07 May 2011 - 03:12 PM

Moving this to the 'cube.

I think you'll get a better set of answers here since this really isn't related to C++ specifically.
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#3 codeprada  Icon User is offline

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Re: Job ideas

Posted 08 May 2011 - 11:29 AM

Employees want a programmer that is capable of thinking logically and can get tasks done efficiently within the required time. Start developing a love for maths if you haven't already. You will see how maths can come in handy if you have to do things like finding primes, statistical data, mapping objects and so forth.

What is the demand where you live? In my country it's web developers\designers. I learned C\C++ but then I quickly realized that was the demand here so I took up PHP, Javascript...etc. It has indeed paid off and I don't have a degree in such areas as yet.

Have a project to present to clients if you choose to do freelance work. It helps to actually show clients that you can do what you say you can do.

You can also look for small time programming companies to get you started in the work field or programming and as time progresses move up the ranks.

Best of luck
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#4 Sethro117  Icon User is offline

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Re: Job ideas

Posted 08 May 2011 - 08:28 PM

I would advise looking at MITs Open Courseware. They have several classes on there which you might find interesting/useful.
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#5 Curtis Rutland  Icon User is online

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Re: Job ideas

Posted 09 May 2011 - 08:35 AM

I have no idea of your actual level of expertise. However, I do know that self ratings are not as useful as they seem:

http://en.wikipedia....93Kruger_effect

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unskilled people make poor decisions and reach erroneous conclusions, but their incompetence denies them the metacognitive ability to appreciate their mistakes. The unskilled therefore suffer from illusory superiority, rating their ability as above average, much higher than it actually is, while the highly skilled underrate their own abilities, suffering from illusory inferiority. Actual competence may weaken self-confidence, as competent individuals may falsely assume that others have an equivalent understanding. As Kruger and Dunning conclude, "the miscalibration of the incompetent stems from an error about the self, whereas the miscalibration of the highly competent stems from an error about others"


So be aware that when you rank yourself "expert" that you may not actually measure up. But you're 16. You have a few years before it even matters.

One piece of advice. Don't turn your nose up at another job just because it's not programming. I spent a few years doing helpdesk-type stuff. It sucked, but it's valid experience at a real company.
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