4 Replies - 8879 Views - Last Post: 06 July 2011 - 09:04 AM

#1 yousufhussain52  Icon User is offline

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Which technology to choose?

Posted 01 July 2011 - 06:33 PM

I am just join a leading MNC and has been given an option to choose from Java and .NET technology ?
Please suggest me which one to choose and why?
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Replies To: Which technology to choose?

#2 maniacalsounds  Icon User is offline

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Re: Which technology to choose?

Posted 01 July 2011 - 07:04 PM

It depends. Do they count C++ as a .NET technology? Technically (if I'm correct), It's not. It is just usable on the .NET platform.

That being aside, C++ would (probably) be the best choice. Plus, it's very used in modern companies, even on the enterprise scale.

However, if C++ is not considered a .NET technology (aka, not a choice), I would personally go with Java. Again, it's just my opinion. However, Java is incredibly easy to pick up (although C# is pretty dang easy too.). It is also incredibly well-used, and has (perhaps) the strongest community for help and support.

Long story short: as long as you don't choose VB.NET on the .NET platform, you'll be fine. :)
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#3 Ace26  Icon User is offline

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Re: Which technology to choose?

Posted 02 July 2011 - 04:15 AM

View Postyousufhussain52, on 02 July 2011 - 03:33 AM, said:

I am just join a leading MNC and has been given an option to choose from Java and .NET technology ?
Please suggest me which one to choose and why?


I see you've been specifically asked to choose between Java and .NET. Let me warn you straight up that you are going to get a lot of subjective answers on this issue but it all eventually depends on you.

On which of these platforms do you have development experience? Which do you find quite comfortable using? Answer these two questions and there you'll find your answer. Both are very sound technologies for building powerful and enterprise level applications.

The ball now is in your court.

Cheers.
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#4 SurfingShark  Icon User is offline

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Re: Which technology to choose?

Posted 05 July 2011 - 05:58 PM

Typically, a Java programmer isn't comfortable with .NET, and a .NET programmer isn't comfortable with Java. They are both powerful platforms. It isn't so much which one is the best, it's more of a question of what can you be most productive with. Because believe me, if you know one or the other inside and out you can do some great things with software.

Long story short, it's a personal thing. Look at Java and .NET code. What looks best and what would YOU rather write code with?
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#5 Curtis Rutland  Icon User is online

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Re: Which technology to choose?

Posted 06 July 2011 - 09:04 AM

Any answer you get here is going to be subjective. I'm a .NET developer, and I'm going to say go with .NET. A Java developer is probably going to say go with Java.

Java is cross platform and very strictly OOP. .NET is single-platform (for the most part), and while it is Object Oriented, it's adding concepts like functional programming (F#) and dynamic languages (IronPython/IronRuby) in as well. Even C# is incorporating these concepts, with LINQ and the dynamic keyword.

Java is more conservative both in release cycles, and what's implemented during these cycles. .NET moves very fast, compared to other platforms. You'll see more changes every time .NET is updated than you will with Java. That means you have new things to play with, but it's also easier to get left behind, or to learn new stuff and not old.

Java's mobile variant (Android, not JME) has a huge market share. .NET's mobile platform (W7P, not Windows Mobile Classic) has a smaller share. On the other hand, W7P uses silverlight, and Android uses a totally different front end system than it's desktop counterpart.

So there are plusses and minuses for both platforms. Pick one and go with it.
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