1 Replies - 341 Views - Last Post: 03 August 2011 - 11:44 PM

#1 AVReidy  Icon User is offline

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How do I set up a basic Apache server after registering a domain name?

Posted 03 August 2011 - 08:24 PM

I'm new to web development and I haven't the slightest clue on how to set up a server and run it under a domain name. I know where to register for a domain name, but I'm lost on what happens next. I'm learning PHP and I use XAMPP.

Say I just got a domain name and wanted to put up a basic website that did nothing more than display a word or two. I need an idea of what this process entails. I don't understand fully what a web host is, but from what I do understand, it is a lot more practical than hosting a website with your own server. But if you had top of the line servers and internet speed, how would you host your website from your own server?

Where and how do I connect my domain name to my server?

Help a noob out. Thanks!

This post has been edited by AVReidy: 03 August 2011 - 08:47 PM


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Replies To: How do I set up a basic Apache server after registering a domain name?

#2 RudiVisser  Icon User is offline

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Re: How do I set up a basic Apache server after registering a domain name?

Posted 03 August 2011 - 11:44 PM

To start a basic hosting infrastructure this is what you need:
A domain name
A DNS Server (well, 2 if you're picky)
A HTTP Server

Once you've bought the domain name, you point the NS (NameServer) records to your nameservers, which are generally ns1/ns2.dnshost.com (but if you have your own domain you can set these up using GLUE records, contact your provider).

Then, on your DNS server, you would setup 2 A records, one for .domain.com, and one for www.domain.com, both pointing to the same IP Address, which is the one of your http/web server.

Then your web server would be configured, generally a Virtual Host configuration, to serve out the files for that domain.

It's all pretty simple once you get your head around it.
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