10 Replies - 465 Views - Last Post: 21 August 2011 - 10:08 AM

#1 modi123_1  Icon User is online

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30 year old review of first IBM PC.

Posted 12 August 2011 - 02:44 PM

We indeed have come a long way folks. Damn kids appreciate what you got!

A good read from the dawn on personal computing - Big Blue style. I wonder if anyone can dig up the original Apple review!

Side question - did anyone pickup those Commodre64 remakes?

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at the moment the machine is only sold in the US. IBM will not say when, if ever, it will come to Britain.


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The IBM monochrome monitor is a very high-quality 11.5in green phosphor device with an anti-glare screen. It gives a rock-steady display with no trace of flickering or that high-pitched whistling that sometimes occurs. The steadiness is achieved by using a high-persistence phosphor coating that takes a fraction of a second longer to clear than most screens, although I can think of one or two machines that are far, far worse.


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All software except Microsoft's Cassette Basic is sold as an extra. Products available during benchtesting include Disk Basic, Advanced Basic, DOS, EasyWriter, VisiCalc, Adventure, some accounts and communications software, and a Pascal Compiler.


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However, a mysterious key called Scroll Lock doesn't actually do anything.


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It can handle up to 17-digit precision, full floating-point arithmetic.


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I'm not too sure about the hobbyist being able to afford it. All the hobbyists I know are beavering away on low-budget equipment, half the fun being able to make these puny systems really perform. I'm not sure they'd be happy with everything done for them.


http://www.v3.co.uk/...onal-model-5150

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Replies To: 30 year old review of first IBM PC.

#2 Creecher  Icon User is offline

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Re: 30 year old review of first IBM PC.

Posted 12 August 2011 - 05:33 PM

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The IBM monochrome monitor is a very high-quality 11.5in green phosphor device with an anti-glare screen. It gives a rock-steady display with no trace of flickering or that high-pitched whistling that sometimes occurs. The steadiness is achieved by using a high-persistence phosphor coating that takes a fraction of a second longer to clear than most screens, although I can think of one or two machines that are far, far worse.



wat
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#3 no2pencil  Icon User is online

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Re: 30 year old review of first IBM PC.

Posted 12 August 2011 - 05:36 PM

View Postmodi123_1, on 12 August 2011 - 05:44 PM, said:

However, a mysterious key called Scroll Lock doesn't actually do anything.

In some aspects we've not come that far at all...
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#4 GunnerInc  Icon User is offline

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Re: 30 year old review of first IBM PC.

Posted 12 August 2011 - 06:45 PM

Ah, the days of staring at green text...
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#5 ishkabible  Icon User is offline

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Re: 30 year old review of first IBM PC.

Posted 12 August 2011 - 08:09 PM

this is so far before my time that i'm having trouble relating to this in any way. who uses Pascal?

edit:
what the hell dose scroll lock do anyhow?

This post has been edited by ishkabible: 12 August 2011 - 08:11 PM

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#6 Lemur  Icon User is online

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Re: 30 year old review of first IBM PC.

Posted 12 August 2011 - 08:37 PM

http://en.wikipedia....iki/Scroll_lock
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#7 Lolzmao  Icon User is offline

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Re: 30 year old review of first IBM PC.

Posted 12 August 2011 - 09:48 PM

Interesting.. I only ever used that key to turn the little light on. It had no other practical use.
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#8 Creecher  Icon User is offline

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Re: 30 year old review of first IBM PC.

Posted 13 August 2011 - 02:15 AM

Just checked every keyboard in my house, none of them have that button (all laptops, woot)


edit: nevermind, it's a FN button, gay.

This post has been edited by NeverPool: 13 August 2011 - 02:16 AM

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#9 v0rtex  Icon User is offline

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Re: 30 year old review of first IBM PC.

Posted 13 August 2011 - 02:46 AM

I have Scroll Lock, it makes my keyboard trance...
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#10 calvinthedestroyer  Icon User is offline

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Re: 30 year old review of first IBM PC.

Posted 20 August 2011 - 10:29 PM

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loudspeaker

Loudspeaker? hahahaha, My IBM's PC speaker wasn't that loud!

Scroll lock? forget that, why don't Americans stop calling the number sign a pound key!
Posted Image
This is a pound key!
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If you take an American keyboard and connect it to a British computer the number sign will output a pound sign. I think this is where some of the confusion comes from.
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#11 lordofduct  Icon User is offline

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Re: 30 year old review of first IBM PC.

Posted 21 August 2011 - 10:08 AM

pound sign in the U.S.

from wikipedia citing the New York Times

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In the United States, the symbol is traditionally called the pound sign or the number sign. The pound name derives from a series of abbreviations for pound, the unit of weight. At first "lb." was used; however, printers later designed a font containing a special symbol of an "lb" with a line through the verticals so that the lowercase letter "l" would not be mistaken for the numeral/digit "1". Unicode character U+2114 (℔) is called the "L B bar symbol", and it is a cursive development of this symbol. Ultimately, the symbol was reduced for clarity as an overlay of two horizontal strokes "=" across two forward-slash-like strokes "//".[1] Keith Gordon Irwin, in The Romance of Writing p. 125, says: "The Italian libbra (from the old Latin word libra, 'balance') represented a weight almost exactly equal to the avoirdupois pound of England. The Italian abbreviation of lb with a line drawn across the letters [℔] was used for both weights. The business clerks' hurried way of writing the abbreviation appears to have been responsible for the # sign used for pound."


note there is a 3500 mile gap between Britain and the U.S. that only in the last century was made easy to communicate across. So for 300 years (English Colonial America began in 1607) we sat on this side of the pond evolving the language in one direction as Britain evolved it in another. I think some of the confusion comes from that people don't realize their language changes over time.




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It can handle up to 17-digit precision, full floating-point arithmetic.


I'm not exactly certain of their semantics here, but technically the 'double floating point number' has 17 digits of precision. Unless they're using the term precision differently, I think they're saying it can calculate double floating point arithmetic.

This post has been edited by lordofduct: 21 August 2011 - 10:11 AM

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