Books on C++

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35 Replies - 28391 Views - Last Post: 10 April 2014 - 05:33 AM Rate Topic: -----

#31 Ryano121  Icon User is offline

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Re: Books on C++

Posted 23 October 2013 - 11:45 AM

Are all the ebooks on that site free?
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#32 andrewsw  Icon User is offline

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Re: Books on C++

Posted 23 October 2013 - 12:02 PM

Yes, there's around 20+ of them so far. They're of good quality (my impression so far).

http://www.syncfusio...chportal/ebooks
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#33 Geeky_Bunny  Icon User is offline

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Re: Books on C++

Posted 03 November 2013 - 06:36 PM

The best C++ book i've found by now is "C++ Programming for the Absolute Beginner, Second Edition" By Mark lee. It's fun to read and at the end he even helps us to make a game o-o
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#34 v0rtex  Icon User is offline

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Re: Books on C++

Posted 05 January 2014 - 11:46 AM

I highly recommend C++ Primer 5th Edition. It's a well written book by some very established authors. (all of which managed or worked with the C++ Development team - read more at the link) plus it can be used as a reference book to my belief as at 976 pages it covers a lot! This being said it can be quite a lengthy read and it's pace is relatively fast, I wouldn't recommend it as a first book on C++. Maybe pick something easier and then read this book afterwards (this all depends on your work ethic and if you have programmed before however).
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#35 AfterBurner66  Icon User is offline

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Re: Books on C++

Posted 07 January 2014 - 08:00 AM

I personally recommend Deitel books, because they stand apart from many others, especially when you're taking a course or will take a course. They are full of examples from simple to advanced, they have a unique academic approach and they definitely in my opinion, teach a language the right way, so to get a grasp of the underpinnings and go from there. Of course they need time, but there is no such thing as learn a language in a day or the other like. If you want to get to a decent level in a programming language, especially talking about C++, I think the choice of "C++ How to Program" is a good one. So far, Deitel books have helped me a lot, in C, Java and the Web, although for the web, it's just a little of everything, but in the right way. I've also found helpful as a beginner, " Programming with C++" from Schaum's Outline Series for a bunch of exercises. These are by no means the only good books out there, but I think they are good in the context you are now.
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#36 JoshMayer  Icon User is online

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Re: Books on C++

Posted 10 April 2014 - 05:33 AM

View PostBench, on 09 September 2011 - 09:11 AM, said:

Please, please ignore any C++ book which contains the following in its title.

"for dummies"
"in X days/hours

Such books are notoriously bad for beginners learning C++ (despite what so called "satisfied learners" might otherwise say on here and on book sites like Amazon). What many of the people who recommend these books generally do not realise is that the books teach you all of the wrong things, and don't actually teach you C++ the right way - instead they'll get you effectively learning the C language first - using all kinds of outdated, unsafe and bad techniques, whilst ignoring many of the fundamental good/safe/easy basic tools which will actually help you learn and use C++ properly.



If you want books which actually teach C++ as a language, then please DO look at the book list which Salem_c posted; books like Accelerated C++, Programming: Principles & Practice in C++ and Lippman's C++ Primer 4th ed are all books which are written by people who not only understand the language, but understand how to learn it and teach it, as well as understanding all of the frustrations which a lot of people run into when learning the C language.

This is as opposed to Sams and Dummies authors, who are all in the school of "learn the low-level C features with all the frustrating and difficult bits first, then un-learn all of that afterwards because it's actually bad, and learn the easy useful stuff right at the end if you haven't given up already".


Sorry to be so negative about Sams/Dummies books. But those books are partly why so many 'new' C++ programmers end up reaching the point where they "think" they know how to use the language, but unfortuately find themselves habitually attached to all of the wrong ways of programming, and face a huge struggle to un-learn it all and re-learn the right things instead.


I've been reading Sams Teach Yourself C++ 7th edition for like a month and I totally agree with you. The author combines C++ and C method without letting readers know. I had to post on this forum several times while reading this book. The only good book from Sams is "Sams Teach Yourself C Programming 7th edition" not the c++ one.
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