Self-taught vs. Professional instuructor

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37 Replies - 9341 Views - Last Post: 05 November 2011 - 02:51 AM

#31 Curtis Rutland  Icon User is offline

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Re: Self-taught vs. Professional instuructor

Posted 20 September 2011 - 07:35 AM

IMO, it's best to have your non-commercial stuff on a simple (but well made) personal web site. That shows you have at least some skill with web stuff, and it should be accessible to the employers when they're pre-screening your resumes.

Of course, there's the stuff you've written for companies. You don't own the code you write for other people on their dime, so you can't exactly show that off. The best you can do is describe the project, and describe your role in the project.
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#32 neato0z  Icon User is offline

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Re: Self-taught vs. Professional instuructor

Posted 22 September 2011 - 02:45 AM

View Posthookiethe1, on 19 September 2011 - 02:44 PM, said:

View PosttlhIn`toq, on 18 September 2011 - 08:44 AM, said:

our company and everyone we work with won't hire university graduates until they have AT LEAST 5 years of real-world experience because in reality they have far more ego than skill.



This gets my panties in a bunch. This is a really shitty attitude that should be shunned by real professionals in this industry. It's really fucking hard to get a foot in the door as an inexperienced graduate in this business, and assholes who think this way only make it tougher. It's the responsibility of all employers in the industry to take in recent graduates and give them the experience that makes them quality programmers. Employers who think like that are just parasites, taking from the pool of talent but never giving anything back.


Good to see im not the only one who feels this way. Ill be graduating soon and hopefully I dont run into any companies with this type of attitude.

This post has been edited by neato0z: 22 September 2011 - 02:47 AM

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#33 Nikitin  Icon User is offline

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Re: Self-taught vs. Professional instuructor

Posted 22 September 2011 - 12:54 PM

Don't worry guys, any half-decent company hires fresh graduates. It's only those low-tier companies that have "far more ego than skill" that don't.
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#34 rjshadley  Icon User is offline

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Re: Self-taught vs. Professional instuructor

Posted 12 October 2011 - 04:54 PM

I think you can really benefit from both depending on what it is. If you can be self taught with access to a person who can help you like on here is very helpful. Also it is cheaper then paying the school thousands, but it is nice to have a structured learning like at school.
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#35 Redalin  Icon User is offline

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Re: Self-taught vs. Professional instuructor

Posted 16 October 2011 - 05:46 PM

The problem that I found with self taught vs Instructional is that self teaching requires a lot of discipline. Whereas being taught forces working under pressure (exams). I tried learning C++ on my own, but found myself getting lazy and ultimately put the book in a cabinet. Now, I'm learning Ruby thru my college and since grades are on the table...I'm finding myself catching onto the concepts faster and making time to research the language, do some code and learning to troubleshoot. :bananaman:

You don't need to go to a expensive school to learn to code. Most schools have adult-learning classes that usually cover programming but don't count towards a college degree.
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#36 macosxnerd101  Icon User is online

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Re: Self-taught vs. Professional instuructor

Posted 16 October 2011 - 06:31 PM

I find there being a difference between learning _ because you are in a class and learning it from the class instructor(s). Generally, if I'm in a class and have to learn language x, I learn it better because I'm forced to work with it. The instructor generally has little impact on how well I learn the language.
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#37 Zachari  Icon User is offline

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Re: Self-taught vs. Professional instuructor

Posted 18 October 2011 - 02:43 PM

View Postmacosxnerd101, on 16 October 2011 - 08:31 PM, said:

I find there being a difference between learning _ because you are in a class and learning it from the class instructor(s). Generally, if I'm in a class and have to learn language x, I learn it better because I'm forced to work with it. The instructor generally has little impact on how well I learn the language.


I completely agree with this point. That being said, I am thankful to have to opportunity to work on my degree in a class setting. It's not always easy because there are times where your brain is dead, and you've got a segfault in one of 9 source files with the project due in 2 hours (gdb is a godsend). I actually enjoy the "stressful" aspect of having to learn it to succeed in the class. It forces me to dig deeper into what's really going on. I also really enjoy that they force it upon the students of the lower level classes to use proper formatting!

I do believe, though, that there's nothing wrong with being self-taught. I am amazed at the knowledge here from people that taught themselves. Being in a classroom and lab setting really shows you that the desire to program does not always guarantee a proficiency at it. There's a reason that some of the classes I've taken have 33% pass rates. It isn't an easy thing to learn, and it's incredibly difficult to become great at it. In the end, your skill and a success as a programmer is really based off of your desire to get better, your commitment to an efficient, applicable-to-task user experience, and your will to understand what you're actually doing, instead of just learning keywords and copying verbatim from other work.
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#38 zombieMadMonkey1971  Icon User is offline

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Re: Self-taught vs. Professional instuructor

Posted 05 November 2011 - 02:51 AM

Quote

I think sometimes its an age and generational thing to.
A 25 year old is more expected to have college for this stuff.
For those of us that are 45+ however, there was no college course for this stuff when we were college age. I grew up on paper terminals that connected to BBS systems via an acoustic couple telephone modem.
Ah, I agree..with this..as we would say or call ourselves old farts..LOL I'm using my VA education benefits to get my BS in software Engineering and use my 21 years of experience to go back and work as an engineer for uncle sam again. Travel well, for me I'd rather stay put..been doing it my whole life..4th gen..military.
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