2 Replies - 963 Views - Last Post: 01 October 2011 - 08:19 PM

#1 BuhRock  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Regular

Reputation: 10
  • View blog
  • Posts: 256
  • Joined: 21-February 10

Entry Level Jobs

Posted 01 October 2011 - 05:10 PM

I was just wondering if anyone here could explain what it would take at minimum to gain a job as an entry level programming job. I'm no where close to gaining a job in programming, as I'm only in my second year in college. So with that being said, what skills should I have?

Also, I wasn't sure where to put this, so sorry if it is misplaced.
Is This A Good Question/Topic? 0
  • +

Replies To: Entry Level Jobs

#2 no2pencil  Icon User is online

  • Admiral Fancy Pants
  • member icon

Reputation: 5327
  • View blog
  • Posts: 27,246
  • Joined: 10-May 07

Re: Entry Level Jobs

Posted 01 October 2011 - 05:28 PM

Quote

I was just wondering if anyone here could explain what it would take at minimum to gain a job as an entry level programming job.


1.) Prove that you have the skill set required to do the job.
2.) Be more of a value to the company than the other applicants.
Was This Post Helpful? 2
  • +
  • -

#3 blackcompe  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Lover
  • member icon

Reputation: 1155
  • View blog
  • Posts: 2,533
  • Joined: 05-May 05

Re: Entry Level Jobs

Posted 01 October 2011 - 08:19 PM

You can take advantage of any co-ops your school offers. You can start your own open-source project or contribute to a pre-existing one. You can talk to your professors about research opportunities. All of those things look good on a resume. Even putting a great deal of effort into something that your passionate about is a good sign.

Often, I see job descriptions with focused skill sets, e.g., J2EE, Spring, RMI; C#, LINQ, SQL Server; PHP, Zend, JQuery; etc. So, it seems that companies want applicants that can actually do the job (i.e. have done something similar). Just like what no2pencil said. And, just to differentiate between candidates that can do the job and those that can do it quickly and with good practices, employers require 2+ years experience.

Just because someone has developed a small web application in Java on their own time or for school, doesn't mean they're proficient in J2EE development. If it takes that person several months to learn one technology that they said they knew, they may become a liability, because now their team mates have to spend precious time assisting them. So, you've got to prove that you are worth it.

You could start researching local companies that offer co-ops so that your prepared in your third or fourth year of school to apply. Review their mission statement, and, if possible, find out what technologies they use by perusing e-classifieds. Then, you could, for instance, create a replica of something they might find useful using those technologies.

You could also gain some experience by developing a free mobile application, where you'll get actual feedback, wants and needs of your users.

It's never too early to start preparing to get hired. You can't over prepare, but you can under prepare.
Was This Post Helpful? 2
  • +
  • -

Page 1 of 1