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#1 modi123_1  Icon User is offline

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Homemade CNCs?

Posted 13 October 2011 - 11:42 AM

Has anyone created, bought, or built their own homemade CNC/3d printers? I've been moderately interested in the CupCake machine out of Makerbot, but would like some hands on reviews and opinions before I jump in the 900+ dollar investment.

Does anyone have a home made 3d printer (be it Cupcake or otherwise)? How was the build for the machine? A pain in the ass? Have you made anything particularly interesting? Does this require a a strong streak of tinker in your blood?

Hmm.. well it seems that the CupCake is discontinued and only the "MakerBot Thing-O-Matic" is available. Lame.
http://store.makerbo...ic-kit-mk7.html

Of course there are other options like Prusa's Mendel RepRap.

Has anyone else thought about picking one up? What were your plans on working with the machine?


http://wiki.makerbot.com/cupcake

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#2 xclite  Icon User is offline

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Re: Homemade CNCs?

Posted 13 October 2011 - 12:50 PM

I have a very small amount of interest in doing something like this, but I've got so much else on my plate I haven't done any investigating whatsover. I do know a friend who went to SCAD that has been doing some really neat stuff with them.
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#3 DarenR  Icon User is offline

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Re: Homemade CNCs?

Posted 13 October 2011 - 12:52 PM

I originally thought you were questioning about CNC machines aka command and control used in manufacturing.
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#4 modi123_1  Icon User is offline

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Re: Homemade CNCs?

Posted 13 October 2011 - 12:56 PM

No.. CNC as in "Computer Numerical Control" for manufacturing.
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#5 xclite  Icon User is offline

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Re: Homemade CNCs?

Posted 14 October 2011 - 01:01 PM

Somewhat related:
http://hardware.slas...rical-panoramas

Apparently made with a 3d printer.

This post has been edited by xclite: 14 October 2011 - 01:01 PM

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#6 WolfCoder  Icon User is offline

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Re: Homemade CNCs?

Posted 14 October 2011 - 01:02 PM

I thought you meant this CnC.

This post has been edited by WolfCoder: 14 October 2011 - 01:02 PM

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#7 modi123_1  Icon User is offline

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Re: Homemade CNCs?

Posted 14 October 2011 - 01:30 PM

@Wolf - no that's a "Friday-leaving-work-song"... That or Marky Mark and the Funky bunch.
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#8 Choscura  Icon User is offline

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Re: Homemade CNCs?

Posted 15 October 2011 - 02:12 PM

I've got the parts for the rig itself sitting in a box under my workbench, and I've got a rough plan in mind for combination endmill/mill(and router)/vertical lathe that I have no budget to actually create. If you're interested in doing serious machining, the gingery books are a good source of basic info on the real machines you need in order to do all of the basic machining operations (although, since you're in the states, you can probably find an old south bend lathe sitting in somebody's yard that you can have for free, if you haul it away yourself).

I don't have a lot of info to give on this, but what I can tell you is that aluminum is probably the most efficient material to make the frame from to start (wood warps and doesn't retain a zero, steel is heavier and more difficult to work with for most people), and the bits on each threaded rod that are actually being pushed by the thread's rotation should have two points of contact pushing away from each other in order to remove all takeup when the rod is rotated in either direction. Also the linear bearings should all have pressure from opposing sides, for the same reason.
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