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#1 Wuzseen  Icon User is offline

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Lisp Interpreter on Windows

Posted 31 October 2011 - 10:47 AM

From what I understand this is sort of "silly" (or at least, some people feel that it is). But I'd really like to start working with Lisp on a Windows Machine. I've been having an absurd amount of issues getting it to work though. I've gone through most of the recommended resources here and many things have straight out not worked.

I've met some success compiling in Eclipse with CUSP. However, the few differences with CUSP make it even harder to learn Lisp! If this question can be answered--perhaps i don't need to find another solution: How do I define multiple functions?! That is to say, not adding extra defuns, but updating the defpackage.lisp :3 I've been trying to find a different solution for lisp because CUSP sorta makes you do this it seems whereas standard Lisp/Common Lisp does not--trying to search specifically for CUSP related issues has been unfruitful.

Emacs + SLIME sort of worked as well, but the configurations to get it running never seemed to take (I've had to re-set up SLIME every time I launch Emacs).

Any halp, guidance, or lulzworthy anecdotes would be appreciated.

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Replies To: Lisp Interpreter on Windows

#2 ishkabible  Icon User is offline

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Re: Lisp Interpreter on Windows

Posted 31 October 2011 - 11:54 AM

CLISP works well. when i was still trying to learn Lisp i would write most of my functions in an editor then load it for use in REPL to test it out.

edit, also if your an Emacs guy then you might try LispBox. it comes set up with SLIME and the doodads.

This post has been edited by ishkabible: 31 October 2011 - 11:57 AM

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#3 Wuzseen  Icon User is offline

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Re: Lisp Interpreter on Windows

Posted 01 November 2011 - 07:03 AM

CLISP seems to be great, thanks for the tip.

My initial reactions with Lisp so far though... "What the zeus is this?"

I said that out loud and got strange looks from coworkers...
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#4 ishkabible  Icon User is offline

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Re: Lisp Interpreter on Windows

Posted 01 November 2011 - 08:20 AM

ya, i tried getting into Lisp but it just really didn't click with me very well. Apparently once you get it, it's like nirvana. I never got there, i traded in Lisp for Haskell :P i plan to come back to Lisp however, maybe once Raynes get's his coljure book out :)
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#5 Wuzseen  Icon User is offline

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Re: Lisp Interpreter on Windows

Posted 01 November 2011 - 08:23 AM

I'm still relatively new to programming, I figure there are many similarities between this and learning other spoken languages--if you learn your "second" language while learning your first you have a much better chance to be fluent. Functional programming is the second language to OOP it seems.

Lisp seems like great practice for programmers. It's focus on data structures and recursion (often sticky subjects) promotes good thinking I feel.

Also, parentheses. :P
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#6 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is offline

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Re: Lisp Interpreter on Windows

Posted 07 November 2011 - 10:33 AM

I haven't got any advice on running lisp on a windows machine - I'm a unix guy - but I can encourage you to keep trying to make it work. It's useful both as a way of generating runnable code and also as a way of making your brain work different. For the practical purposes, if you're interacting with Java code, I suggest you consider clojure. I'm not very fond of it yet, but I can see that a lisp that targets the jvm is pretty useful for real-world application.
clisp is pretty cool, it's what I'm spending time on right now. Conrad Barsky's Land Of Lisp book is fun, and takes you through a lot of the concepts in contemporary functional programming. It's not going to make you a lisp hacker, I think, but it'll walk you through a lot of useful stuff. And it's got cartoons, so what more could you want?
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#7 nmeans73  Icon User is offline

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Re: Lisp Interpreter on Windows

Posted 07 November 2011 - 11:06 AM

If you are looking for a full ide, you could give LispWorks a try. It is free for private use and has a REPL and text editor. I believe it also does some good stuff like optimize tail recursive calls. The only drawback I have found with it is sometimes if you crash your code, the ide will crash as well and there is a time limit you can leave it open in the personal edition. Other than that, it's pretty good, it's free, and it doesn't have as steep a learning curve as emacs/slime.
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#8 ShawnStovall  Icon User is offline

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Re: Lisp Interpreter on Windows

Posted 07 November 2011 - 06:50 PM

If you're interested in getting an Emacs install up and running I've found this tutorial to be very helpful in getting Emacs going with SLIME and CLISP. There's also another tutorial available by the same author which uses SBCL instead of CLISP, if SBCL is more to your liking. They're kind of old but fully adaptable for newer versions of Windows. If you're looking to learn Common Lisp I found this book to be quite good, but it may be a bit more difficult to someone who is completely new to programming.

A really good resource for learning functional programming, or programming at all for that matter, is How to Design Programs. It teaches Scheme instead of Common Lisp, but anything you learn in Scheme should be easily transferable to other lisps with a little work. This book uses an IDE called DrRacket (the book refers to it as DrScheme) that comes completely set up for all the exercises in the book (seeing as how it was made by the same people who wrote the book) and also provides a very comfortable environment for a language family that can be exceptionally harsh to newcomers. It can be found here. (It has gone through some updates since the book was written, but still fully supports the language used in the book.)
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