Programming, Careers, and Money

Looking for discussion on current/best languages

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10 Replies - 1663 Views - Last Post: 04 April 2007 - 02:49 PM

#1 anndr0id  Icon User is offline

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Programming, Careers, and Money

Posted 26 March 2007 - 08:35 AM

So I'm sure we've all asked this question before in one way or another, but I know the answer changes almost monthly as new technologies arise and die. Ultimately, everyone has their own opinion on whats best, but there's a underlying factor when it comes to programming, unless you're learning it for a hobby, you're probably using your knowledge to pay the rent... that is why, as a web programmer, I learned ASP even though i prefer PHP.

But now, as a web developer of 10 years, I'm realizing my field is being overrun by flash developers, and I just abhor creative sorts of things.

So, I pose a topic of questioning and discussion of this:

As a programmer who has focused on web development, I'm looking to get into software development.

So, as of now, what is the best programming language to begin to gain knowledge in for software development, based on future longevity (I realize this is only an opinion), popularity among companies, and revenue from knowledge?

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Replies To: Programming, Careers, and Money

#2 spullen  Icon User is offline

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Re: Programming, Careers, and Money

Posted 26 March 2007 - 08:39 AM

c++ seems to be the language to know. I think if you know any OOP languages you should be fine, cause they all are pretty much the same.
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#3 Programmist  Icon User is offline

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Re: Programming, Careers, and Money

Posted 26 March 2007 - 09:18 AM

This is the third post about "what's the best language" recently. If you look at the most recent 4-5 posts, you'll see two other topics on this. You're going to be hard-pressed getting any impartial info, however, because people get really touchy about their pet language and will try to sell it to you like a used car. :) Here's what you want to do. First, think about what kind of development you want to do (embedded systems, drivers, operating systems, desktop apps, distributed applications, web applications, etc). Next, call up several recruiters and ask them what's hot in <your choices>.. Most likely you'll hear C#, Java, and possibly C++, among others. But, if you really like web development, I can tel you that it's not all Flash. If you know J2EE (Java), you're likely to have a lot of opportunities.

This post has been edited by alcdotcom: 26 March 2007 - 09:19 AM

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#4 ajwsurfer  Icon User is offline

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Re: Programming, Careers, and Money

Posted 26 March 2007 - 10:35 PM

I think that C++ programs become more platform specific non web applications.
A lot of C is used for low level on the hardware drivers, and in building programs that will later be burned into hardware.
There are specialized engineering languages that I don't know much about.
And Java programming tends to be more higher level web and business type applications.

In the higher level applications there comes databases and connectivity.

And then we have .Net which is a very platform specific group of languages geared toward one thing. Compete with Java. Microsoft is doing a good job of it too. Just as they have done with SQL Server 2005 all out onslot against Oracle.
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#5 rahulbatra  Icon User is offline

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Re: Programming, Careers, and Money

Posted 26 March 2007 - 11:50 PM

This will be a totally subjective choice, but I'll give you my honest opinion - Java. Firstly, its a nicely designed language stressing you to implement good programming practices. Secondly, a lot of enterprise software development is done in Java, so there are plenty of options.

Plus because of its adoption, its OO paradigm and its rapid development/update cycle, you can be pretty sure its a decent bet.
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#6 alpha02  Icon User is offline

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Re: Programming, Careers, and Money

Posted 04 April 2007 - 09:58 AM

View Postrahulbatra, on 27 Mar, 2007 - 02:50 AM, said:

This will be a totally subjective choice, but I'll give you my honest opinion - Java. Firstly, its a nicely designed language stressing you to implement good programming practices. Secondly, a lot of enterprise software development is done in Java, so there are plenty of options.

Plus because of its adoption, its OO paradigm and its rapid development/update cycle, you can be pretty sure its a decent bet.


You're right, Java is definitly the best. It offers many advantages such as:
-Cross-platform
-All can be done in Java
-Nice syntax (easy to understand)
-More stable code

and much more. I definitly recommend it, although it is hard to learn at first. Once you master the thing, all can be done! Just ask if you need any help.
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#7 max302  Icon User is offline

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Re: Programming, Careers, and Money

Posted 04 April 2007 - 10:38 AM

Java is one of the most used language, so it's worthwhile getting into, just to learn that complicated OOP stuff, but it has some flaws. Amongst which is the need for a specific interpreter, JRE, slower execution, and lack of other things taken as granted in other languages, like NULL. I also don't like the idea of having to compile my code then interpret it afterwards. On the other side, cross-platform compatibility is cool. Then, you can go with C# if your planning on developing under windows, and C++ under linux.

That's one of the big aspects that you need to check out. Linux, UNIX and the like are pretty much all c/c++, meaning that contrary to alpha02's perception, its is far from being outdated. C++ is slightly more difficult to code GUI with, but it's much easier to begin with, as with your PHP knowledge, you'll be churning out console apps in no time.

The include system also works the same, where as true OOP works with namespace, class and methods, which is a bit weird once you have gotten into the habit of including files to get all the functions it contains.

To resume: Take your language per platform:
C++ for Windows and Linux (mostly) and Mac (i guess, i never dev'ed under mac)
C# for Windows (it is possible to code it for posix also)

Make Java one of your toilet reads. You need to learn it, and the concepts that come with it, but don't make it your priority.
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#8 Programmist  Icon User is offline

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Re: Programming, Careers, and Money

Posted 04 April 2007 - 11:33 AM

This is the second reply recently that has said (basically) that Java is a good learning language, but not much else. I really wonder how many of the people who say that have actually worked as developers, or have looked at the market recently. Java jobs are huge. Before landing my current position I had three other offers on the table. I can't tell you the number of interviews I've had where at least one of the interviewers have said that experienced Java developers are hard to find. Java developers typically make 80K - 100K+ (in the us anyway). Many business use Java heavily (or exclusively) in the multi-tiered systems. If you don't know it, you're missing a huge chunk of an growing, well-paid job market that won't be dying anytime soon. So learn C/C++, Perl, Python, Scheme and whatever you like. The more different types of languages you know, the better. But getting into a strong market is your goal, Java is a very good option.
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#9 Programmist  Icon User is offline

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Re: Programming, Careers, and Money

Posted 04 April 2007 - 11:45 AM

View Postmax302, on 4 Apr, 2007 - 10:38 AM, said:

...slower execution, and lack of other things taken as granted in other languages, like NULL...


Let me address your "slower execution" claim by pointing you to this article.
If you want to read it you'll see that the claims of slow execution are a thing of the past.

Java does have a null entity. The fact that you don't know that tells me that you are not qualified to be giving people advice on whether they should or should not learn Java.

This post has been edited by alcdotcom: 04 April 2007 - 11:46 AM

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#10 Amadeus  Icon User is offline

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Re: Programming, Careers, and Money

Posted 04 April 2007 - 11:50 AM

Well, I have worked extensively as a developer, and now run 3 development teams. I can tell you that Java experience and knowledge is always a plus for the people I hire, and i have in the past sought specifically java developers for certain roles.

It was not the first language I learned (I'll always be a c/C++ guy at heart), but I got to know it very well as time went on.

I feel that the more languages people know the better, but java is definitely one of the top draws in today's market.
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#11 max302  Icon User is offline

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Re: Programming, Careers, and Money

Posted 04 April 2007 - 02:49 PM

View Postalcdotcom, on 4 Apr, 2007 - 02:45 PM, said:

Java does have a null entity. The fact that you don't know that tells me that you are not qualified to be giving people advice on whether they should or should not learn Java.


You are absolutely right, I have no experience using Java. To the risk of looking like someone who tries to save his arse from shameful correction, these are things that I heard from different sources. Your clarification and proof makes sense, thanks for pointing to the article.
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