Error handling

To deal with invalid data

  • (2 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2

16 Replies - 1783 Views - Last Post: 10 April 2007 - 01:10 PM Rate Topic: -----

#16 1lacca  Icon User is offline

  • code.rascal
  • member icon

Reputation: 44
  • View blog
  • Posts: 3,822
  • Joined: 11-August 05

Re: Error handling

Posted 10 April 2007 - 09:17 AM

Ah yes, I've almost forgotten why I've even started replying.
As I said, I've tried ot point out, that generally there are two kind of policies about hiring programmers, and why I think the second one is better. So, in my opinion hiring somebody who doesn't even know the language itself, to work on a production system and hope that providing him with selfexplanatory code will work out sounds strange. I don't think that they know half of the libraries especially with Java, and the rest is history, as seen on Worse than failure or formerly the Daily WTF. They'll implement existing functions, use overcomplicated constructs, etc.
So I would say that there is a minimum knowledge that is needed to start work on a production project. In my reasoning above I was talking about a production project, and I was referring with fully trained to somebody who has completed college and is ready to work in a production environment. Sorry for the bad wording.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#17 Programmist  Icon User is offline

  • CTO
  • member icon

Reputation: 252
  • View blog
  • Posts: 1,833
  • Joined: 02-January 06

Re: Error handling

Posted 10 April 2007 - 01:10 PM

View PostRyan Smith, on 10 Apr, 2007 - 08:19 AM, said:

I agree, a programmer isn't really fully trained without knowing how to properly use break and continue.
I also agree, goto: should be banned. Not only can it get ridiculously confusing... it's reminiscent of batch files, and its usefulness stops there.

break, continue... according to JR may hinder breaking things into smaller calls, but some things.... a breakup may not be intended or even necessary.

The only formatting that I agree with is that you stick to one. As long as you maintain your formatting, I don't care if your methods look like

public void aMethod() {
}



or
public void aMethod()
{
}



as long as you have continuity.

It may not be the best programming practice, but the more readable and described your code is, the easier it is to find someone to replace you. There was a kid in one of my Java classes who used variables such as h9d8s7a6. Really. No comments. And methods named things like m3j3j3j3(). His coding's cryptic.

Man, if someone is so paranoid about their job that they intentionally obfuscate, it's time to move on. Someone codes like that in most of the places I've worked and they'll find themselves getting replaced anyway. Personally, I prefer to make myself less replaceable by being good, rather than code obfuscation.

View Post1lacca, on 10 Apr, 2007 - 09:04 AM, said:

Quote

I'd consider anyone fully trained, I'd want to see that they'd worked in the industry and done some development in a production environment using enterprise tools and know how to program well. That's how I'd measure it and not whether or not they know every keyword or have a certification. That means nothing to me. You interview with me, you'd better be prepared to code. smile.gif

Agreed, on hands experience is essential - ok, I haven't pointed out, but never denied it either. And yes, I know quite a number of students who graduated without any real programming skills. However my main point was (and seems to be missed) that in some environments you can code without thinking about babysitting somebody who comes after you, because the HR will make sure, that (s)he won't even see your office from the inside, and you can concentrate on writing good code productively. I think it is much more important to have each function be just as big as to fit onto one, or one and a half screen (ok, without going into obfuscation, naturally) than to make it a never ending story, because it is easier to look at at once. Anyway, it is all about tastes, but it is also true, that in some places you do have to produce code that can be read and easily modified by beginners, or droids, or whatever...

Sometimes I wish we had some droids to do the paperwork. :)

This post has been edited by alcdotcom: 10 April 2007 - 01:07 PM

Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

  • (2 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2