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#1 2patrickMurphy  Icon User is offline

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Graduate Programs?

Posted 04 March 2012 - 04:38 PM

I'm currently working on my B.S of computer science and i will be minoring in math.

When it comes time for my masters degree i will either master in CS or math.

If i master in math ill go for my doctorates in mathematics as well.

If i master in computer science i might just stop there.

As for a doctorates in computer science, i do not know because what excites me the most so far in programming is discovering formula's and solutions involving math. The reason i chose CS major instead of math major for my bachelors is because i want to have the knowledge to help improve efficiency and all that other stuff instead of just enough knowledge to create the program needed.

Also if this is possible ill try this but it might require a lot more work. Ill grab the CS masters degree and get a doctorate in mathematics. But I am highly positive your masters degree program should match your doctorate program. So I do not know.

But please share your ideas for graduate school, or the programs you guys are already enlisted in.

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#2 blackcompe  Icon User is offline

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Re: Graduate Programs?

Posted 04 March 2012 - 05:00 PM

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As for a doctorates in computer science, i do not know because what excites me the most so far in programming is discovering formula's and solutions involving math.


Programming is a minor aspect of CS. The only part of research that involves programming is making a prototype of your research, which may take considerable time, but I'd imagine most of your time would involve studying. The point of research is to come up with new ways to solve open ended problems or a problem that has yet to be addressed. That involves investigating a lot of the work that has already been published. You'll be reading tons of publications.

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i do not know because what excites me the most so far in programming is discovering formula's and solutions involving math.


Sounds like you like applied CS or scientific computing.

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The reason i chose CS major instead of math major for my bachelors is because i want to have the knowledge to help improve efficiency and all that other stuff instead of just enough knowledge to create the program needed.


Many researchers have degrees in mathematics. Many of them apply Math concepts to problems in the CS world. Graph coloring in compilers is one example. Some researchers have degrees in CS, and they apply CS concepts to real world problems.

Perhaps you ought to be talking to a professor about this if you're serious about doing a thesis in graduate school.

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Also if this is possible ill try this but it might require a lot more work. Ill grab the CS masters degree and get a doctorate in mathematics.


I'd like to think a PhD in Math is a lot harder than a MS in CS. You might be pooped by time you get your PhD. I don't know. I'm sure its been done. StackExchange would be a good place to ask this kind of stuff, second to your professors of course.
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#3 2patrickMurphy  Icon User is offline

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Re: Graduate Programs?

Posted 04 March 2012 - 05:39 PM

Thanks for the feedback ill be talking to my advisor about this as well. Also to clear up some confusion, if i go for masters in CS ill get my Math doctorate after my cs masters. But the reason i think it will be a lot of work is because i am missing all the information that would be taught to me during the masters program of Math and bachelors of Math so i would have to do independent study or lots of extracurricular work to do well on my doctorate. But thank you for your time, ive already been a part of a research team at my college, when i get past my freshman year ill be much more involved in research.

View Post2patrickMurphy, on 04 March 2012 - 05:37 PM, said:

Thanks for the feedback ill be talking to my advisor about this as well. Also to clear up some confusion, if i go for masters in CS ill get my Math doctorate after my cs masters. But the reason i think it will be a lot of work is because i am missing all the information that would be taught to me during the masters program of Math and bachelors of Math so i would have to do independent study or lots of extracurricular work to do well on my doctorate. But thank you for your time, ive already been a part of a research team at my college, when i get past my freshman year ill be much more involved in research.

i re-read the post i put in, and noticed you understood what i was saying. So ignore this.
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#4 blackcompe  Icon User is offline

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Re: Graduate Programs?

Posted 04 March 2012 - 05:45 PM

No problem.

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But the reason i think it will be a lot of work is because i am missing all the information that would be taught to me during the masters program of Math and bachelors of Math so i would have to do independent study or lots of extracurricular work to do well on my doctorate.


IMO, that's more reason to go for a formal Math education. CS can probably be learned more easily outside of school than Math. Pure math is all around harder than CS.

This post has been edited by blackcompe: 04 March 2012 - 05:49 PM

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#5 2patrickMurphy  Icon User is offline

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Re: Graduate Programs?

Posted 04 March 2012 - 06:19 PM

But im ok about missing a few classes in my bachelors degree, i have a professor who has already agreed to help me learn stuff that is not being taught in my degree (math professor). So when i get my gpa high enough and get accomstomed to college life i can go to him and get some help and then pursue my masters in math and so on. That wont be too bad, but going straight to doctorate after a cs major will be pretty rough. I understand what your saying about cs being easier to learn on your own. But i brought that up to a professor of mine and he said you want to learn the way its tought in class and not the way you learn on your own. He says both may be good and of same quality, but they are not the same. So i figure what he means is, all these ways and tricks for efficiency and how to code for readability I might have a high chance of never learning if i do it on my own.

But in the end run, it will all depend on what kind of programming i enjoy the most. Depending on that is where i will choose my master, for now the top runners are CS and Mathematics
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#6 blackcompe  Icon User is offline

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Re: Graduate Programs?

Posted 04 March 2012 - 07:03 PM

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But i brought that up to a professor of mine and he said you want to learn the way its tought in class and not the way you learn on your own.


Definitely.

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So i figure what he means is, all these ways and tricks for efficiency and how to code for readability I might have a high chance of never learning if i do it on my own.


You'll get assignments that are well-thought out with good instruction as to how to do them and actually learn something. With a formal education, a lot of things that seem hard become much easier when you've got someone (a professor/TA) assisting you through their assignment specifications. Your not scouring the Internet looking for resources that sort of give you the direct information you need to implement something. I'm referring to projects in major CS topics, e.g. design your own SQL compiler, TCP/IP layer, Robotic software. Efficiency and readability can be learned on your own. If by efficiency you mean efficient algorithms, well....that would be better learned in school, especially if you plan on doing research in that area. But if you mean efficiency as in "don't create a crap load objects in memory that you don't need", you don't need school for that.

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That wont be too bad, but going straight to doctorate after a cs major will be pretty rough.


You got that right!

Whatever you choose to do, good luck with your studies.
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