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#1 programguy75  Icon User is offline

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VB jobs and what to expect

Posted 04 April 2012 - 08:10 AM

Hello everyone,

I am wondering if anyone here is a VB programmer for a company of any sort? How much different is the job from doing the college work? If you could give any information on this, I would greatly appreciate it.

Thanks
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#2 modi123_1  Icon User is offline

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Re: VB jobs and what to expect

Posted 04 April 2012 - 08:16 AM

VB6 or .NET?
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#3 programguy75  Icon User is offline

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Re: VB jobs and what to expect

Posted 04 April 2012 - 08:50 AM

I do have experience in both, so either one.
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#4 modi123_1  Icon User is offline

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Re: VB jobs and what to expect

Posted 04 April 2012 - 08:57 AM

Well what do you want to know? There's more planning... more data retention.. lots of CRUD functionality... you'll find you miss quite a bit of bugs but your users won't... company style guides... a few asinine things the company makes you do 'just because'... *shrug* though those could be applied to any language of choice in the company world.
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#5 Ryano121  Icon User is offline

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Re: VB jobs and what to expect

Posted 04 April 2012 - 09:02 AM

I have zero experience with VB but I will give you my two cents generally.

I found it very different. At college I normally wrote crappy code for the assignments. I didn't really care about them and wanted to get them out of the way so I could get on with something I actually was interested in. In the work environment however I am actually interested in pretty much every aspect. I take a lot of pride in writing good quality, maintainable code.

I have only been working in the industry for a few months now, yet I can safely say that I have learnt more in the last couple of months than I did in a couple of years at college. Mainly because it's very different. There is a real focus on source control which doesn't exist at college. You also spend A LOT of time planning which is something I just didn't to at college. If you don't plan, and plan well then you will screw something up very badly. You also get more experience in writing / contributing to big systems rather than just writing a couple of hundred line banking utility.

There is also the aspect of teamwork. I don't know about you but at college I was mainly working on my own. Yes there were team working projects, but nobody really cared about each other. However now I work in a team practically every single day. If you balls something up (which will happen), you are often screwing over you team-mates as well (if they then can't meet a deadline)

Yes you will probably still be programming, but for me at least, the general atmosphere was extremely different (for the better IMO).

This post has been edited by Ryano121: 04 April 2012 - 09:03 AM

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#6 programguy75  Icon User is offline

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Re: VB jobs and what to expect

Posted 04 April 2012 - 09:04 AM

Thanks for the input. Also, what about as far as coding goes. I know when taking VB6 and VB.net classes, the course covered the entire book. In the company setting, is everything that you learn applied in the company setting? or do you just touch on certain things?
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#7 modi123_1  Icon User is offline

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Re: VB jobs and what to expect

Posted 04 April 2012 - 09:15 AM

Quote

In the company setting, is everything that you learn applied in the company setting? or do you just touch on certain things?

Everything what? In the book or in your degree? Yeah most of the contents of any given .NET book is applied on a regular basis.
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#8 Ryano121  Icon User is offline

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Re: VB jobs and what to expect

Posted 04 April 2012 - 09:15 AM

Think if it as a language is just a tool to getting the job done. Any language features that you learn are merely ways to get the job done quicker and better.

I don't use everything I learnt at college (although I do use a lot of it), and I doubt anybody does use every single thing. I just use those things that will help me do whatever I need to do.

Edit - are we just talking about VB here, or a whole CS college course which includes a lot more than just programming?

This post has been edited by Ryano121: 04 April 2012 - 09:17 AM

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#9 BobRodes  Icon User is offline

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Re: VB jobs and what to expect

Posted 11 April 2012 - 02:18 PM

programguy, you'll probably find that there are things from school that you don't use at all, and that there are things that you go into in considerably more depth than you found yourself doing in school. It's the difference between theory and practice, really: theory comes up with ideas and implementations of those ideas, and some of them are found useful in practice and some aren't.

A good example of this would be the use of ActiveX Controls and DLLs in web pages. You can certainly do this, just create one, put it in an Object tag with its GUID and version identifier. Then, in theory, your browser encounters this object reference, looks in its machine's registry to see if it's there, fires it up if so, and downloads it if not. Works great. Leverages the processing power of the client and the programming power of VB or C++ to build rich client interfaces with internet access. We were all over that for several months back in 1997 or so. (I was a Microsoft Certified Trainer at the time, teaching Microsoft classes in VB6.)

It didn't take long for everyone to figure out that downloading and installing an ActiveX DLL on their machine was a huge security risk. Microsoft tried hard with the certificate authority thing, but users didn't really trust Bill Gates with the keys to their personal castle. So, things went the way of ASP and server-side programming, and browser functionality has remained very much thinner than the machines that house them are capable of.

So, you're liable to find the same thing in your company environment. Unlike in college, you will find people with a great deal of experience in things that haven't worked. You will find that the next great thing is generally shunned like the brand new car model (let them use other people to work out the design problems), and you will find people with narrower and deeper expertise than in college. If you gain that deeper expertise, while retaining the broader knowledge of your training, you'll be a valuable asset to an organization.
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