9 Replies - 4811 Views - Last Post: 30 April 2012 - 03:19 PM

#1 AKMafia001  Icon User is offline

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What Is Conventional Software Engineering?

Posted 29 April 2012 - 09:33 AM

Hey Guys!

I have to ask that does conventional software engineering include both plan driven models and agile models or is it something else? Do we compare conventional software engineering with object oriented software engineering?

I need to have an idea about what exactly is conventional software engineering and what comes under it? Also, if anyone would provide some useful links.

I have the book: Software Engineering, A PRACTITIONER'S APPROACH by Roger S. Pressman

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#2 turboscrew  Icon User is offline

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Re: What Is Conventional Software Engineering?

Posted 29 April 2012 - 11:45 AM

I guess it's the mainstream way before the agile methods.
(Waterfall, V-model, ... containing the separate phases: requirements, design, implementation and testing.)

Check the print year of the book. Mine is pre-2000.

Also then there was some "unconventional" methods, like Boems spiral method. Looks somehow familiar?
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#3 AKMafia001  Icon User is offline

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Re: What Is Conventional Software Engineering?

Posted 29 April 2012 - 11:56 AM

Well I know all of them. Just wanted to know what would actually come under conventional software engineering.

What models specifically are?

- Linear Sequential Model (Waterfall Model)
- Evolutionary Process models
- Prototyping Model
- Spiral Model
- Incremental Model
- Component Based Development
- Rapid Software Development
- RAD (Rapid Application Development) Model
- Agile Methods

Do the phases also include in it? As you also mentioned, requirement, analysis, design, coding, testing, etc.

Actually I have got a presentation on it. So, I need to know what exactly I should present.

Thanks for replying...
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#4 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is online

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Re: What Is Conventional Software Engineering?

Posted 30 April 2012 - 08:08 AM

View PostAKMafia001, on 29 April 2012 - 01:56 PM, said:

Well I know all of them. Just wanted to know what would actually come under conventional software engineering.


"Conventional" just means "the stuff I wish to disparage". Waterfall, etc., were straw men for the Cult of Agile, and now "conventional Agile" is a straw man for "kanban" and other Agile++ models. So just pick stuff and call it "conventional" and you'll be in the swing of things.
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#5 turboscrew  Icon User is offline

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Re: What Is Conventional Software Engineering?

Posted 30 April 2012 - 11:06 AM

That's why I asked AKMafia001 to check the print year.
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#6 wordswords  Icon User is offline

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Re: What Is Conventional Software Engineering?

Posted 30 April 2012 - 12:23 PM

Turboscrew is right - usually 'conventional' software engineering means the waterfall process, and agile is seen as more more 'progressive'.
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#7 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is online

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Re: What Is Conventional Software Engineering?

Posted 30 April 2012 - 01:01 PM

View Postwordswords, on 30 April 2012 - 02:23 PM, said:

Turboscrew is right - usually 'conventional' software engineering means the waterfall process, and agile is seen as more more 'progressive'.


You're behind the times. Nobody beats on waterfall anymore, that horse is well dead. The cool kids are starting to pick on agile now. (By "now" I'm speaking pretty broadly - this is all three or four years old).

And this makes sense, when you think about it. The only reason anyone writes about development methodologies is to sell their book or their consulting services, so "conventional" will always be a moving target. There are a bazillion "agile gurus" running around teaching people how to tell user stories, as if this is something that nobody ever did before, and so of course there are mozillions of guys trying to come up with the newester latester thing so they can be the head guru in charge next year. So was it ever. Probably in a decade, someone will come up with a model that looks a lot like parody waterfall, and it'll have a turn being the hot thing. ("It forces your developers to design first, it enforces discipline, it provides structure! Yes, it's difficult, that's a good thing, because if you're doing it, that means you have the best developers!")

This is just a magic show. There's only so many ways to make a card disappear, but there's an endless supply of stories to tell about the disappearing card.
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#8 wordswords  Icon User is offline

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Re: What Is Conventional Software Engineering?

Posted 30 April 2012 - 02:47 PM

I'm sure you can find a dozen or so developers on the internet rambling on about their chosen process. In practical terms though, and from the OP's perspective, ie: what is currently written in the textbooks, 'conventional' methodologies usually means waterfall, and agile methodologies are usually seen as progressive.

I also don't really understand what you're going on about when you say 'Agile++'. It's still agile. Scrum is agile. Kanban is still agile. Scrum is agile. If you are saying there is a conflict between Scrum vs Kanban, then I would agree. But Kanban isn't in competition with 'Agile' development.. because Kanban.. is agile. Having been in teams that use both Kanban and Scrum, there is not a huge amount of difference.
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#9 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is online

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Re: What Is Conventional Software Engineering?

Posted 30 April 2012 - 02:59 PM

Okay, if by "conventional" you mean "preferred tackling dummy of the stuff you read where you were in college", then sure, "waterfall" is conventional. It's no more "conventional" than, say, the Catholic mass with the priest intoning in Latin while facing away from the congregation or leaded gas, but if you like, call it conventional.

It's all marketing anyway, so it doesn't make a lot of difference.
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#10 wordswords  Icon User is offline

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Re: What Is Conventional Software Engineering?

Posted 30 April 2012 - 03:19 PM

Maybe 'traditional' would be a better word than 'conventional'.
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