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#1 searcher920  Icon User is offline

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Work habits

Posted 30 April 2012 - 04:43 PM

There are always new editors and IDEs, etc., coming out but I like to stick with whatever I'm used to. This might be because I am old. But I think it's more efficient to do things the same way. On the other hand, I could be missing the advantages of the new things. The only editor I used, for years, was VIM, because I felt that's the only way it could become second nature. But there was always someone telling me I didn't know what I was missing out on by not using the latest IDE.

I guess it all depends and there is a benefit in changing if the new thing really is better. I definitely do not see any advantage in constantly changing, because then nothing ever becomes second nature.

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Replies To: Work habits

#2 CTphpnwb  Icon User is offline

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Re: Work habits

Posted 30 April 2012 - 06:53 PM

I think there is a downside to things becoming second nature. Change is necessary, but change is hard. It's harder still when you resist it.
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#3 turboscrew  Icon User is offline

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Re: Work habits

Posted 01 May 2012 - 01:16 AM

I check the new IDE etc. when I start getting the image that it's become some kind of de-facto standard or otherwise is used a lot. I tend, however, to stick with standards and defaults, so in a new environment (machine) the stuff is already there.

So I was once a heavy user of Emacs. Nowadays I use Geany if it's there or gedit, if there is no Geany. On the Linux-side, that is. And for C, C++ and some other occasional stuff.

The point is: I have been assigned to work within our customers' premises with their machines. I need to be able to cope with what I'm given in those situations, so I have to be able to work with fresh installs.

I use Geany, because it feels alright and is there in most Gnome-based distros install-ready by default. If I can't use it, I'll use gedit.

SO for me it's more of a "compatibility" question.

This post has been edited by turboscrew: 01 May 2012 - 01:27 AM

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#4 no2pencil  Icon User is online

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Re: Work habits

Posted 01 May 2012 - 01:37 AM

View Postsearcher920, on 30 April 2012 - 07:43 PM, said:

The only editor I used, for years, was VIM, because I felt that's the only way it could become second nature.

First thing I do after any fresh install is remove the alias from vi to point to vim, & replace it with a link from vi to /usr/local/bin/vi or where ever it's installed. I completely agree. You work with what's efficient. Though vi may not seem efficient to others, it's saved my ass more times than I really care to admit. When something doesn't boot right, & you get that minimal boot for maintenance, yeah. I find myself editing the fstab with vi for say a disk failure, or something dependent. Plus network connections, & so on.
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#5 wordswords  Icon User is offline

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Re: Work habits

Posted 01 May 2012 - 01:33 PM

I usually setup a shell environment wherever I am working. When on Windows I use cygwin, when on a Mac I use macports. These bits of software allow me to download command line tools such as bash, 'grep' 'wget' and 'find', 'svn' 'git' and 'cvs' as well as use 'python' and 'sed' to script tasks. I have even setup an ant environment in cygwin which I can use to build complete java packages with ant.

In this shell environment I use vim exclusively. I will also use IDEs such as Eclipse and graphical version control such as TortoiseSVN on top of this directory structure; this is possible because the whole filesystem is accessible from the shell, and I can check something complex out using TortoiseSVN, and just run 'svn up' in Cygwin to quickly fetch the latest update.

This gives me the best of both worlds for Java development - Eclipse with its autocomplete and generally handy refactoring and project management options, and a shell environment for when I want to go into the internals of a project.
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#6 searcher920  Icon User is offline

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Re: Work habits

Posted 01 May 2012 - 04:00 PM

View Postno2pencil, on 01 May 2012 - 01:37 AM, said:

View Postsearcher920, on 30 April 2012 - 07:43 PM, said:

The only editor I used, for years, was VIM, because I felt that's the only way it could become second nature.

First thing I do after any fresh install is remove the alias from vi to point to vim, & replace it with a link from vi to /usr/local/bin/vi or where ever it's installed. I completely agree. You work with what's efficient. Though vi may not seem efficient to others, it's saved my ass more times than I really care to admit. When something doesn't boot right, & you get that minimal boot for maintenance, yeah. I find myself editing the fstab with vi for say a disk failure, or something dependent. Plus network connections, & so on.


I think it is good to know vi/vim, and it takes practice to learn them. That's why I used only vim for several years, even though other editors may be easier. Vi is always there on any unix system, and it starts up instantly. And you can make it into your one IDE by customizing as much as you want.

i use a different editor most of the time now, because my boss told me to. I don't know why, but I had to mindlessly obey. But there are still plenty of times when I have to ssh to a remote server and vi a file. So I'm glad I don't have to look up the commands.
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#7 no2pencil  Icon User is online

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Re: Work habits

Posted 01 May 2012 - 05:13 PM

View Postsearcher920, on 01 May 2012 - 07:00 PM, said:

I used only vim for several years, even though other editors may be easier.

Vi/Vim are actually easier once you get to know a good amount of the shortcuts.

View Postsearcher920, on 01 May 2012 - 07:00 PM, said:

i use a different editor most of the time now, because my boss told me to. I don't know why,

Because that's what most bosses do. Their idea of efficiency is you doing what you are told.
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#8 NotarySojac  Icon User is offline

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Re: Work habits

Posted 05 May 2012 - 05:13 PM

If you want to try something knew, I would check and see if there are any VIM plugins or new features that would apply well to your language of choice. VIM is an extremely powerful tool so if you're good with it, you're not missing out on much other than M$'s intellisense. I just haven't had enough time to study and memorize all of it's shortcuts.

http://blogs.gnome.o...ion-with-vim-7/
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