4 Replies - 924 Views - Last Post: 12 June 2012 - 06:53 PM

#1 kiwiPaul  Icon User is offline

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How do you find a software bloke to build your ideas?

Posted 28 May 2012 - 11:54 PM

No crap about it, I have very limited knowledge of software. What I do know is that I think outside of the box and what I need isnt invented yet and works off Google maps. Be patents involved to be owned as its completely new. Where do you find someone to build software without contributing a single cent? Any ideas?
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#2 no2pencil  Icon User is offline

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Re: How do you find a software bloke to build your ideas?

Posted 28 May 2012 - 11:55 PM

View PostkiwiPaul, on 29 May 2012 - 02:54 AM, said:

Where do you find someone to build software without contributing a single cent?


Sourceforge.
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#3 modi123_1  Icon User is offline

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Re: How do you find a software bloke to build your ideas?

Posted 29 May 2012 - 06:49 AM

Quote

. Where do you find someone to build software without contributing a single cent? Any ideas?

Honestly? Learn to program yourself.
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#4 Cenron  Icon User is offline

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Re: How do you find a software bloke to build your ideas?

Posted 09 June 2012 - 02:08 AM

You will NEVER EVER EVER find someone that will be willing to write this for free if you plan on making money off, of it. Even if your willing to share the profit with them eventually, you will need to explain this in a way that the programmer will understand, IE: Design docs, flow charts, etc. Even the designers of programs, who may never right a single line of code which is rare, have to understand how programming works so they can break down every little DETAIL.

Going from a raw idea to a working finished product takes a lot of steps in between. My recommendation would be learn to program the best you can, create a google code account and start writing as much code to the best of your ability and as you get better update your code to reflect this knowledge, also along the line try to bring people into to contribute and help you as partners. Dont worry about making millions because thats not gonna happen right off the bat. You need to completely share your idea and what you have designed so far with everyone, get people that are interested into the group and make a badass project and if its popular enough you can eventually start charging money for it or for support, or updates.
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#5 ulent  Icon User is offline

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Re: How do you find a software bloke to build your ideas?

Posted 12 June 2012 - 06:53 PM

Here's a few points that - as a developer - ring true for me. Most of them are tidbits I've read or heard over the last couple of years and hopefully will help you get on your way:

1) you get what you pay for. If you *really* want a programmer that will work for free, chances are that you won't get a particularly good programmer. There may be some exceptions, but there are also a lot of well-funded places that are looking for good programmers.

2) be very clear about what you're offering. Assuming you've revised your thoughts given point (1), then I agree with Cenron - be clear about how they will benefit from the arrangement. Ideally you'd lay out what the benefits are in the present and future, and it's a very good idea to have something legal in place that defines exactly who gets what, whether you make millions or not.

3) Good programmers will usually want to work with someone that's at least vaguely capable of explaining their ideas technically. So (again, like Cenron said) go and get into some coding yourself. You don't have to become a guru, but you at least have to be able to get on the same wavelength as your guru counterpart. For a developer it's important to have someone that understands the technical side so that they won't expect unreasonable things, and are able to design the product to better accommodate things that can be practically implemented.

4) There was some advice I heard on pitching to angel Investors or similar people that you might want to help out with an idea: build something.

It doesn't have to be a fully functional system, it just needs to be a prototype. Maybe there's nothing going on 'behind the scenes' of the application, but having a prototype of your idea is infinitely better than trying to explain it without a tangible asset.

It's good advice for two reasons - 1) it gives a feel of what you're going for, whether it looks like it will work, and more readily displays the 'point of difference' of your product/application. 2) it shows you're committed to doing this thing. By taking the time to actually learn and make the beginnings of a product you show that you're committed to following through on the idea, and it's not just a 'flash-in-the-pan' likely to run out of steam within a couple of weeks of getting started.

Sorry for the drawn out reply, but hopefully at least some of that is useful.
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