Example WPF project ideas?

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#1 agentkirb  Icon User is offline

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Example WPF project ideas?

Posted 04 June 2012 - 01:42 PM

I've been trying to teach myself WPF, and I wonder if a good way to go about it would be to take example project ideas and try to implement them using WPF. Problem is, I can't think of enough good ideas (that are within my beginning level grasp) to turn into projects. Anyone know of a site where they have example project ideas that I could try to tackle?
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#2 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Example WPF project ideas?

Posted 04 June 2012 - 02:11 PM

View Postagentkirb, on 04 June 2012 - 02:42 PM, said:

I've been trying to teach myself WPF, and I wonder if a good way to go about it would be to take example project ideas and try to implement them using WPF.


Probably not.



There are three routes people seem to take when learning programming.
  • Just start trying to create programs
  • Start taking apart other programs and try to figure out the language by reverse engineering
  • Follow a guided learning course (school or self-teaching books)


For the life of me I can't figure out why people try 1 & 2.
Sure, 35 years ago the only way I could learn BASIC as a kid was to type programs from a book into a TRS-80 model 1 or Commodore VIC-20, then figure out the commands and syntax by watching the results as the program ran. There simply wasn't any courses for a kid back then.

But now, you can't help but to trip over "Learn {coding language} in 3 weeks" type books and the entire internet is at your disposal for tutorials.

I strongly suggest taking the guided learning approach. Those book authors go in a certain order for a reason: They know what they're doing and they know the best order to learn the materials.

Quote

Where do I start?


You start by learning a coding language FIRST.
Learn to plan before you type.
THEN you start designing software with a purpose.


If this sounds like you

Newbie/Rookie said:

I have a little programming experience but I need to write ...
read this section
Spoiler


Otherwise, you can just jump to the resources here:
Some of the tutorials below are for C# or Java not C, C++, VB.NET [...]. But the conceptual stuff of classes, object oriented design, events etc. are not language specific and should give you enough guidance in theory of program development for you to be able to look-up specific code example in your chosen coding language.



Resources, references and suggestions for new programmers. - Updated Mar 2012
Spoiler

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#3 agentkirb  Icon User is offline

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Re: Example WPF project ideas?

Posted 04 June 2012 - 03:26 PM

I don't like that you automatically assume things about me as you copy and paste in your pre-programmed "you clearly sound like a noob programmer, go look it up yourself and stop asking us" response. I didn't plan on going into a back story on why I'm asking for what I'm asking for, but since you are going to be condescending about it I'll tell you.

I'm friends with someone that does this sort of thing for a living and he's said that he's willing to help teach me this stuff. But he's not a qualified teacher that has a lesson plan and all of that... and it would probably be too much to ask the guy to come up with a good lesson plan since he's already going out of his way to help me out. So I've taken it upon myself to find WPF programming ideas and get him to help me work through them.

If I were taking a WPF class at college, I would assume they would have mini-projects and labs that they do to help them learn the technology. What I'm asking for is basically along the same lines. I'm not asking for anyone to help me program a WPF app, I'm just asking for ideas that I can use for educational purposes. So if anyone wanted to help me with that, I would really appreciate it.
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#4 bflosabre91  Icon User is offline

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Re: Example WPF project ideas?

Posted 05 June 2012 - 06:27 AM

How about this.

http://www.dreaminco...ect-ideas-list/

You really shouldn't be so quick to get mad at someone who is obviously trying to help you but just trying to get a better idea of how he can help you instead of giving you blind answers.
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#5 eclipsed4utoo  Icon User is offline

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Re: Example WPF project ideas?

Posted 06 June 2012 - 09:04 AM

View Postagentkirb, on 04 June 2012 - 06:26 PM, said:

If I were taking a WPF class at college, I would assume they would have mini-projects and labs that they do to help them learn the technology. What I'm asking for is basically along the same lines. I'm not asking for anyone to help me program a WPF app, I'm just asking for ideas that I can use for educational purposes. So if anyone wanted to help me with that, I would really appreciate it.


Then you assume wrong. You learn the language, then write mini-projects. The professor does not say, "OK, write me a Notepad app.". You would learn about the RichTextBox, you would learn how to read and write files, etc., then you would write the app.

Trying to take an app and write it in WPF isn't going to teach you anything.
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#6 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Example WPF project ideas?

Posted 06 June 2012 - 09:53 AM

Let me take a different approach...

You acknowledge that a guided learning approach with a lesson plan is the best way to learn.

View Postagentkirb, on 04 June 2012 - 04:26 PM, said:

I'm friends with someone that does this sort of thing for a living and he's said that he's willing to help teach me this stuff. But he's not a qualified teacher that has a lesson plan and all of that... and it would probably be too much to ask the guy to come up with a good lesson plan since he's already going out of his way to help me out.


I suggested you pick up a book on the subject, or use the on-line tutorials that follow a lesson plan (and provided a heap of links and suggested books etc)...

View PosttlhIn`toq, on 04 June 2012 - 03:11 PM, said:

I strongly suggest taking the guided learning approach. Those book authors go in a certain order for a reason: They know what they're doing and they know the best order to learn the materials.


You asked if starting off trying to make projects in WPF was a good idea:

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I wonder if a good way to go about it would be to take example project ideas and try to implement them using WPF.

I answered that question with "Probably not".
So why are you pissed off at me? You asked questions and we/I answered them. What's the problem?

Sorry if that wasn't the answer you wanted, but we're not here to lie to you and tell you only what you want to hear. Later eclipsed4utoo told you the same thing, that just jumping into making projects without an understanding is a bad idea. So either two senior coding professionals don't know what they're talking about or a rookie looking for help has an attitude problem when he doesn't get rainbows and unicorns blown up his skirt. Which do you think is more likely?

We're not hear to be your cheer leaders, take you by the hand with kidd gloves or spoon feed you every tiny scrap of information. We are hear to help you and treat you like an adult. So one adult to another: Jumping people's shit for being honest with you is not a good way to go through life. Don't confuse casual remarks with hateful remarks. I did not talk down to you in that first reply. I simply didn't spend 3 hours custom tailoring a response to your specific situation or question because that's not practical when there are 500,000 members on this board. Getting all retalitory like you did just puts you on the heap with other juvinile rookies that make many of the seniors here think twice about whether or not to help rookies.


Quote

I'm friends with someone that does this sort of thing for a living a



I would also point out that not everyone that does a thing, can teach a thing. Someone that builds automobiles may not be able to teach you how to design them. Not every football player is a good coach. The same applies to programming. There are tons of coders out there. Being a coder, does not make you a software engineer. Being a software engineer does not make you a coder. They are different jobs.

A software engineer architects a program design. They develop the plan as to how the program will operate. That plan really is language independent to a great degree. They just have to understand the object interaction and it doesn't much matter if it is coded in VB.NET, C# or Objective-C.

A coder (programmer) takes the assignment (the specification of PART) of the project and writes the code for their 'black box' of the program.

The senior programmer generally takes all the black boxes of code and fits them together, makes adjustments or tells the lower level programmers what to fix in their code.

Try this analogy. The software engineer makes the blueprints. The coders make the individual lego blocks. They don't understand how ALL the blocks work. Only that they are to make a yellow block, two rows wide, 7 rows long. The senior assembles the legos according to the engineer's blueprint.

In many shops those jobs overlap. Mine is a good example. We don't have teams of people. Each person has to wear many hats. In this shop the guy engineer is also the coder: He designs the product then writes all the code for it.

In larger shops that just not the case. The whole point of WPF is to get away from that. Many times the people that do the XAML and make the GUI's aren't programmers at all. They are graphic artists that do the design of the GUI. That's it. Their total job is making the interface. They don't have to understand any C# for the code behind that makes the program work.

So to be clear, when you say you want to learn WPF that pretty much means you want to be a graphic artist that makes the Window GUI's and means you need to know Expression Blend and XAML. There's not a lot of lessons needed to get started with WPF: Open a project and drag and drop controls to the window. There is a lot of power in WPF without getting into the code behind.

If you also want to be a coder, then you need to learn C#, VB.NET or some other .NET language and that has NOTHING to do with WPF. You can learn C# and use it in WPF, WinForms or just console application with no GUI.

If you also want to be a software engineer, then you need to learn how to architect and design the entire application workflow.

So depending on what you really want to learn, you have a long road in front of you. Like any journey you should decide what your destination is before you start asking (us) for directions. And when you tell people "I want to go someplace that i haven't clearly defined" don't get pissy when they give you directions that are generic, vague or someplace other than what you had in mind but didn't articulate.

This post has been edited by tlhIn`toq: 06 June 2012 - 09:56 AM

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