VIRGIN PROGRAMMER

I am brand new at this- I want to learn and need lots of help

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2 Replies - 1728 Views - Last Post: 27 May 2007 - 10:46 PM Rate Topic: -----

#1 bipolar_rebel  Icon User is offline

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VIRGIN PROGRAMMER

Post icon  Posted 27 May 2007 - 06:11 PM

I am brand new at this programming stuff- I want to learn C++ and I need lots of help. Please help me get started. I don't even know what it means to write my code like this [code]. I am a lost cause but I am thirsty to learn.

This post has been edited by bipolar_rebel: 27 May 2007 - 06:13 PM

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Replies To: VIRGIN PROGRAMMER

#2 NickDMax  Icon User is offline

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Re: VIRGIN PROGRAMMER

Posted 27 May 2007 - 06:47 PM

Well, the code tags are used like this:

if you were to type out:

[code]
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
cout << "Hello World";
return 0;
}

[/code]

it would generate a little box in your post that looked like:
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
	cout << "Hello World";
	return 0;
}



This is nice because the code box preserves formating, uses a monospaced font, and does not become smilies or other BBCode elements.

As for programming in C/C++ well first you need to get a compiler. There are a lot of them out there. I use Borland 5.5 (which is free in command line version), Microsoft vissual C++ 6 and 2003, and GNU C++. There are many others, some are free some are not. I myself have not really found that I like a particular one over anyother but there are technical differances between them.

Next I would get a good book. I would say it is best to start at your local book store because you really want to browse and find one that looks and feels like it will compliment your learning style. I myself hate programming books that are written to a very broad audience as they tend to be too simplistic and often make technical mistakes in an effort to make things easily digested (such as encouraging the use of void main()). But you know you have to start somewhere and if these books get you going without loosing motivation than I say get one. You can always buy a technical and boring book as a technical referance later.

If you are forced to use Amazon or another form of mail-order then I might recommend "The C++ Programming Language" by Bjarne Stroustrup (the inventor of C++). This book is not too technical, and yet I am willing to bet it has few technical errors in it. But it might make a better referance then learning material for a new programmer. I also liked a book titled, "Accelerated C++: Practical Programming by Example" by Andrew Koenig and Barbara E. Moo. This has a textbook feel to it and is not terribly technical though again does not seem to have many technical errors.

Once you get off the ground then there are lots of great tutorials out there that will begin to bridge the gap between knowing the syntax and knowing how to do something in the language.

Pluse you can always ask questions here (now that you know how to use the code tages).
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#3 ajaymatrix  Icon User is offline

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Re: VIRGIN PROGRAMMER

Posted 27 May 2007 - 10:46 PM

I appreciate your thirst to learn coding... keep it up...
Check out the resources page...
http://www.dreamincode.net/resources/]http://www.dreamincode.net/resources/[/url]

Books :
Lots are available...
I use Deitel and Deitel... An ok book...
Lots of online resources are available..
The MSDN stuff is also pretty good..
any problems you have just feel free to ask..
All the best in your venture...
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