What Does Windows 8 really mean ?

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49 Replies - 7106 Views - Last Post: 06 December 2012 - 04:23 PM

#46 BobRodes  Icon User is offline

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Re: What Does Windows 8 really mean ?

Posted 05 December 2012 - 10:59 PM

Once voice recognition technology gets as accurate as typing, typing will be pretty much obsolete and so will touch screens.
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#47 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is offline

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Re: What Does Windows 8 really mean ?

Posted 06 December 2012 - 01:00 AM

Unless of course people find it more efficient to type. For example, I could imagine speaking code at the rate that I type it, but I can't imagine spitting editor commands as fast as I type them. And developing a metalanguage for editing using a verbal stream seems like it'd be a little difficult. In a real editor, you do it by changing context, either by holding a meta-key or changing modes. In a toy editor, you play with a mouse. What would you do in a verbal context to tell the machine "capture the text from this point minue two lines to this point plus three lines, taking the whole line at both ends, and keep it in the clipboard"? And do you really want to learn that language?

Not to mention the problem of trying to work in a room full of people mumbling into microphones - it would make me crazy in no time, I can tell you that.
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#48 erad  Icon User is offline

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Re: What Does Windows 8 really mean ?

Posted 06 December 2012 - 02:19 AM

View PostBobRodes, on 06 December 2012 - 05:59 AM, said:

Once voice recognition technology gets as accurate as typing, typing will be pretty much obsolete and so will touch screens.


hehe, think of all the sore voices leaving a software house at the end of the day. Voice recognition has been 'almost there' for about 15 years, will it ever arrive. I don't think its much more than a gimmick, a bit like 3D TVs.


Anyway, regarding the debate, a lot of people seem to think that everyone must use computers in the same way. Yes for the past 20 years you've used a desktop or laptop for software development, internet browsing, games, spreadsheets, report writing, graphic design, etc etc. The only thing that's changing is that the tablets and mobiles are taking away some of those functions. You can have your desktop for software development, writing reports and spreadsheet, then your tablet for surfing and video calls etc. One size doesn't fit all anymore.

It doesn't fundamentally change software development anyway, if you design it properly with a thin front end, you can write your software as you normally would and bolt on a touchyswipypinchy front end if that's what the user wants.
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#49 lordofduct  Icon User is offline

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Re: What Does Windows 8 really mean ?

Posted 06 December 2012 - 07:51 AM

I don't see that happening.

In software -
Programming languages are not very conducive to speaking. Have you tried to 'read' code out loud to your mates? It's very difficult to do. The languages would have to be altered and adapted to speaking... and even still, it'd be cumbersome.

Imagine a small office like the one I work in, 4 programmers all within close proximity. People coming in and out of our room looking for help pertaining to the software. Ugh...

I've also done a lot of standing in front of groups talking in my life. May it be teaching, tutoring, product discussions, etc. I've talked for 3,4,5 hours straight... and I mean STRAIGHT. And it's exhausting. We once did a 5 day event where all 5 days I spoke for 6 hours (3 2hr sessions). Not in conversation or discussion, but as just talking non-stop... my voice was beat to shit for the next couple weeks. And even in back-and-forth talking like teaching, ask a teacher how they feel about talking at the end of the day. Software dev jobs can have 8,10,and even 16 hr days... no. thank. you.


Not in software -
And what about office work. Writing up legal documents, business documents, and other formal documents in strict English. We don't speak strict English, we speak a free-form language. I could only imagine the grammatical errors that fall out of voice recognition typing.

And again this is long hours of "typing". Usually done in the company of several other people. Often mid business.


Voice recognition typing would be very useful for those who can't physically type. As well as being novel for people who are writing short informal e-mails and instant-message. Both of which could be easily replaced with actual "talking" via phone/voip/etc.



It's just not practical.

This post has been edited by lordofduct: 06 December 2012 - 07:54 AM

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#50 h4nnib4l  Icon User is offline

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Re: What Does Windows 8 really mean ?

Posted 06 December 2012 - 04:23 PM

Again, I think the voice recognition thing goes back to content consumption vs creation. To use the Star Trek example previously given, the commands given to the ships' computers via voice are all fine, but I doubt the software that they're interacting with was created by voice commands. Maybe software can be modularly assembled with voice commands, but at some level, far enough down, it would just be too tedious. That's really no different than the idea (previously discussed) of using a touchscreen to develop. It might be fine for plugging previously-assembled modules together, but somewhere there has to be guts, and I sure as hell don't want to create those guts verbally.
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