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#1 Logik22  Icon User is offline

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Can C# accomplish this?

Posted 17 July 2012 - 03:47 PM

I'm starting to build up a portfolio. I have a Java program nearly complete and I am planning my next project. I think I would like to do something like this:

http://leaguedaddy.com/

Essentially it is a website for leagues. You can input teams, create rosters, input stats, league standings, etc. I could probably accomplish the same thing with HTML/CSS/PHP but it seems like Java and C# have a fair amount of jobs relating to them so I think I would prefer to use C#. From my research I think C# is capable of it but what I'm wondering is if this would be the proper application for it. I would be using a mySQL database with this. Basically I would like to avoid "painting myself into a corner" so to say.

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Replies To: Can C# accomplish this?

#2 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is online

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Re: Can C# accomplish this?

Posted 17 July 2012 - 03:55 PM

How can you even think about putting this in your portfolio as C# if you don't yet KNOW C#? Do you really think you are going to just take 30 days to learn it and your first C# program will be professional-grade enough to be in your portfolio and impress prospective employers?

Man to man I think you are either very delusional about your skill-level, or very insulting to the rest of us that actually do this for a living.
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#3 Logik22  Icon User is offline

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Re: Can C# accomplish this?

Posted 17 July 2012 - 04:03 PM

I need to start somewhere. You need to realize that for entry level positions you need something. They get a ton of prospects that have degrees so that is not enough to make me stand out. I can either get work experience or have a portfolio. That is a bit of a catch 22 because I can't have work experience if no one takes a shot on me. Either way I need to have something so they know I'm not a dud just so I can get the opportunity to have work experience.

I know a LITTLE bit of C#. This is how I learn. I feel more comfortable starting a project and picking myself up as I fall down as opposed to reading a book cover to cover. For whatever reason I retain the information better so it is a better choice for me. Instead of shooting down my idea maybe you could post an alternative method.

Who said anything about 30 days (or any short period for that matter)?
Who said anything about professional grade?

This post has been edited by tlhIn`toq: 17 July 2012 - 04:35 PM
Reason for edit:: Please don't quote the entire previous post: It just makes the threads really long.

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#4 jared.deckard  Icon User is offline

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Re: Can C# accomplish this?

Posted 17 July 2012 - 04:21 PM

That website looks like it would make a great project. If you look at the source code, it looks like his ASP is written by hand. No traces of Visual Studio postback scripts.

If you want to use C# you need ASP for your website. I use Visual Studio 2010 ASP .NET at my job. We use it for everything, even for things I though would be a windows application.

If you want to learn ASP without an IDE, start here.

If you have Visual Studio or are interested in getting it, start here.
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#5 Logik22  Icon User is offline

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Re: Can C# accomplish this?

Posted 17 July 2012 - 04:25 PM

Thank you for your helpful input. I will review those resources.

This post has been edited by tlhIn`toq: 17 July 2012 - 04:35 PM
Reason for edit:: No need to quote the entire previous post: We can all see it.

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#6 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is online

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Re: Can C# accomplish this?

Posted 17 July 2012 - 04:34 PM

Well... If it's not professional-grade then you wouldn't put it in a portfolio. That looks like either you think student-grade *is* professional-grade which will do you more harm than good, or like you are trying to 'pad' your presentation which doesn't help you either.

Be honest about your skill-set when you apply: You don't have to have a 'padded' portfolio if you are honest on your resume. Under skills say "good at: xx, yy, zz. Weak in aa, bb, cc". Prosepective employers will RESPECT a person who is is honest with them and more importantly honest with themselves and not pretentious or have an over-inflated opinion of themselves. Employers all know that your skills are not going to be a 100% match to their needs. Many employers (including my own) consider that degree to be a problem not a positive. To them (and us) it just means lots of bad habits from university that don't match the real world and an expectation to receive $100,000/year right out of school. Our company prefers real-world experience to college any day of the week and twice on Sunday.

What would do I recommend? I tell people this over and over and over:
1 - Learn.
2 - After 5 self-teaching books and 100 on-line tutorials, and only after all that do you even begin to think about designing your own application.

Quote

This is how I learn. I feel more comfortable starting a project and picking myself up as I fall down as opposed to reading a book cover to cover. For whatever reason I retain the information better so it is a better choice for me.


I wrote FAQ 28-31 with exactly this kind of statement being asked/said over and over.. (Click the SHOW button below)
FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions - Updated July 2012
Spoiler







You asked what I would recommend. This is what I recommend over and over:


Stop trying to architect a program while you are still learning the basics of C#. It just never works. Its like saying you are going to learn home architecting WHILE you hammer boards together without a blueprint, and try to learn both new skills at the same time.

First learn the language. Do a couple hundred tutorial projects where you build what you're told to build, the way you are told to build it WITH AN EXPLANATION OF WHY so you can learn.

Then later you can start architecting your own simple stuff. Build a calculator. Build a DVD library program. Etc. Stuff that doesn't involve a lot of complexity. Then move up.



There are three routes people seem to take when learning programming.
  • Just start trying to create programs
  • Start taking apart other programs and try to figure out the language by reverse engineering
  • Follow a guided learning course (school or self-teaching books)


For the life of me I can't figure out why people try 1 & 2. I strongly suggest taking the guided learning approach. Those book authors go in a certain order for a reason: They know what they're doing and they know the best order to learn the materials.

Quote

Where do I start?


You start by learning a coding language FIRST.
Learn to plan before you type.
THEN you start designing software with a purpose.


If this sounds like you

Newbie/Rookie said:

I have a little programming experience but I need to write ...
read this section
Spoiler


Otherwise, you can just jump to the resources here:
Some of the tutorials below are for C# or Java not C, C++, VB.NET [...]. But the conceptual stuff of classes, object oriented design, events etc. are not language specific and should give you enough guidance in theory of program development for you to be able to look-up specific code example in your chosen coding language.



Resources, references and suggestions for new programmers. - Updated Mar 2012
Spoiler

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#7 macosxnerd101  Icon User is online

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Re: Can C# accomplish this?

Posted 18 July 2012 - 12:35 PM

I do tend to agree with tlhIn`toq that this is a big project for your first C# program. I would personally pick smaller projects to learn the language with first. There is nothing wrong with wanting to build up your portfolio, but your codebase should be clean as well. And when working with a language for the first time, it's unlikely that anyone's code would be stellar. So that's another reason to put this project on the backburner perhaps until you get more experience. If you're putting the time and effort into it, you should get the full benefit of this project.

Start with your database on this project. Focus on organizing your data in a clean and normalized manner. Since you are working with .NET, you might find MS-SQL to be easier to work with than MySQL. I'm not a .NET guy personally, but maybe someone more well-versed can better advise you here. Since it sounds like you have a Java background, the OOP should come pretty easily.

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I could probably accomplish the same thing with HTML/CSS/PHP but it seems like Java and C# have a fair amount of jobs relating to them

HTML/CSS and PHP have a number of jobs as well. If your only reason in choosing C# is for jobs, then I don't think you have much over PHP. Again- either language will work. And lots of people develop in PHP, so it's not like it isn't a plus on a resume.
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