Building Expertise - looking for advise...New Language to learn...

  • (2 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2

21 Replies - 2128 Views - Last Post: 28 July 2012 - 08:23 PM

#16 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

  • Please show what you have already tried when asking a question.
  • member icon

Reputation: 5625
  • View blog
  • Posts: 12,064
  • Joined: 02-June 10

Re: Building Expertise - looking for advise...New Language to learn...

Posted 21 July 2012 - 10:25 PM

View Postjknasse2, on 21 July 2012 - 11:18 PM, said:

i dont want to spend 100 hours learning C# to realize i should have went the java route


LMAO... You wish it was only 100 hours to learn C#.

C# and JAVA are so close in syntax that if you learn one you can easily read the other. Just look at posts in each of the forums here that have code samples. The difference is that C# has the entire .NET framework behind it. The same framework you would have become familiar with in VB.NET. So you have a huge advantage there. Personally if I were you I'd use that to your advantage. You should be able to transition from VB.NET to C# without a lot of pain because you should already have the .NET framework under your belt. Once you feel you have C# under your command, the transition to JAVA shouldn't be too painful because you will already be comfortable with the syntax.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#17 jknasse2  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 0
  • View blog
  • Posts: 9
  • Joined: 21-July 12

Re: Building Expertise - looking for advise...New Language to learn...

Posted 21 July 2012 - 10:31 PM

i c i c...

i find C# very similar but just dont see the benefit to invest the hours to learn it

i have seen C# programmers within my company do more things as far as PDF parsing and just more robost programming

i thought java could do everything C# could do and more...java is more about controling objects, web sites and devices
i thought moving directly to it and skipping c# could save me time

i only need to control office devices (excel and access) and i thought VB could do all of that
between C# and Java java is the bigger leap...i feel with the latest VB 2010 you can do almost everything related to my job that you can do in C#

so stepping to java would be smarter
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#18 Utael  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Head

Reputation: 55
  • View blog
  • Posts: 210
  • Joined: 12-December 11

Re: Building Expertise - looking for advise...New Language to learn...

Posted 22 July 2012 - 01:32 PM

Then you've made your decision. I may get a lot of flack but I'm a c# guy, I learned java but the whole needing to have an emulator run the program doesn't seem like a solid foundation to work on business code that may be used 10 years from now. If Oracle decides to do a major overhaul of their emulation system that means hours of work to get old code up to speed again... I may be completely wrong (I'm not terribly advanced in either language) but those are my thoughts.

Either way you've already made your decision.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#19 Lemur  Icon User is offline

  • Pragmatism over Dogma
  • member icon


Reputation: 1381
  • View blog
  • Posts: 3,510
  • Joined: 28-November 09

Re: Building Expertise - looking for advise...New Language to learn...

Posted 22 July 2012 - 03:50 PM

Here's a little secret: No matter what language you learn, if they're in the same family they are extremely similar. When you have the fundamentals of programming down it's a matter of syntax.

Object Oriented and Functional, if you know one strong language in both categories (C++/C#/Java and Clojure/Haskell/Scala) you can learn pretty much anything.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#20 jknasse2  Icon User is offline

  • New D.I.C Head

Reputation: 0
  • View blog
  • Posts: 9
  • Joined: 21-July 12

Re: Building Expertise - looking for advise...New Language to learn...

Posted 22 July 2012 - 08:00 PM

Thanks for the insight guys I appreciate it - java is definately challenging coming from a VB world and C# would be an easier transition. A couple responses below! =)

modi123_1

Quote

Side note - you didn't need to go all nuclear option on your hard drive.. you could have installed a virtual machine

I backed up all my data on my laptop to external and went all in with ubuntu to force myself to get experience with linux. I have a home desktop and at my office im running windows. Figured I would make a step and move my laptop to ubuntu and try to code in that environment. I had the time because AT&T is ridiculously slow setting upmy internet, phone, and tv at my house...

modi123_1

Quote

Didn't anyone tell you - programming, and dealing with programmers, is a lot like Thunderdome. The scene for Thunderdome was loosely based off a Michael Stipe acoustic song based on a droll IT convention?

I've interacted with a programmers before at work but I guess they never told me how dumb or lazy they think I am. =)

tlhIn`toq

Quote

You're competing for jobs against 5 million of your closest strangers just from this country alone. Half a million of them are users of this very site. So pointing out everything that will get your resume shuffled to the bottom of the interview scheduling stack *is* giving you some love.

That is true. Lately I have entertained the idea of trying to pursue a programming analyst role. When I look at jobs they usually want you to have Java experience in combination with VB or C#, SQL, .NET
It is very competitive for sure and there are a lot of smart people doing great things just like in other industries. However, a good programmer seems to have a mix of a lot of languages. When I looked on indeed.com for entry level programming analysts they wanted somebody with computer science, MIS, engineering, or related degreeo that also have knowledge in 3 languages and/or a scripting language. For some reason in my area Java and Sharepoint knowledge are high in demand along with experience coding in C#, VB, .NET and a scripting language.

tlhIn`toq

Quote

C# and JAVA are so close in syntax that if you learn one you can easily read the other. Just look at posts in each of the forums here that have code samples. The difference is that C# has the entire .NET framework behind it.

This has been my main challenge to decide which way to go. C# seems easier to learn for me because I programmed in C++ in college and have experience writing code in .NET. Even when looking at Java code the syntax is really foreign and I am having to tackle my head around basic ideas. C# I view as more familar given my background in C++, and would be definately easier/faster for me to learn. One area that I think I am extremely weak in though is that I have no understanding of creating web applications. I have this notion that learning Java could quickly fill this along with give me the tools to program devices. The value added from learning C# doesn't really improve my arsenal in the things I could do day-to-day at my work or where my interets are and I am really just trying to improve my hard skills as quickly as possible. Overall, Java is harder to learn put adds completely differnet things I can't do in VB (or thats what my research has lead me to believe)
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#21 Utael  Icon User is offline

  • D.I.C Head

Reputation: 55
  • View blog
  • Posts: 210
  • Joined: 12-December 11

Re: Building Expertise - looking for advise...New Language to learn...

Posted 22 July 2012 - 08:35 PM

I think you are confusing java and javascript. They are not the same.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

#22 Lemur  Icon User is offline

  • Pragmatism over Dogma
  • member icon


Reputation: 1381
  • View blog
  • Posts: 3,510
  • Joined: 28-November 09

Re: Building Expertise - looking for advise...New Language to learn...

Posted 28 July 2012 - 08:23 PM

If you really have a functional base in C++ then most any language should be trivial considering C was effectively the father of much of any OO language out there. The differences are so minute that it should be trivial. This is assuming you know C++ intimately.

Pick one language and learn it as thoroughly as possible. Don't touch anything else until you know it by heart. C++ is a great candidate, but if you take a lackadaisical cafeteria approach to it you will suffer.
Was This Post Helpful? 0
  • +
  • -

  • (2 Pages)
  • +
  • 1
  • 2