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Poll: Computer Organization or Set Theory? (0 member(s) have cast votes)

Computer Organization or Set Theory?

  1. Computer Organization (0 votes [0.00%])

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  2. Set Theory (0 votes [0.00%])

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#1 KaptainCavy  Icon User is offline

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Computer Organization or Set Theory?

Posted 02 August 2012 - 09:33 AM

Alright! So I am currently signed up for both 'Set Theory' and 'Computer Organization.' I am a CS major and potentially a math minor. 'Set Theory' is a requirement for the math minor; while you all know that 'Computer Organization' is a requirement for the CS major. I have yet to take 'Discrete Structures,' nor have I taken 'Data Structures.' I plan to take these two courses this upcoming semester. So, I will be enrolled in 'Discrete Structures,' 'Data Structures,' and either 'Set Theory' or 'Computer Organization.' Will I be prepared for 'Computer Organization?' I have only completed my introduction programming courses. Someone told me taking 'Computer Organization' without having gone through 'Discrete Structures' and 'Data Structures,' makes the class extremely difficult; while others have told me it is an overall easy class. As far as mathematics goes I have complete 'Calculus I' and Calculus II' and took a philosophy class dealing with logic. But I hear 'Set Theory' is a game of its own; very challenging. Any suggestions? Thanks in advance.

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#2 DarenR  Icon User is offline

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Re: Computer Organization or Set Theory?

Posted 02 August 2012 - 09:37 AM

Yeah I never heard of any of those classes or what they do. I went for BS in Software Engineering. So to sum up what your saying is that you are unsure as to how much work you can handle while taking college courses. Well talk to others who have taken the courses and ask them how much work is really involved and thus you will have your answer. Just remeber over taxing yourself never does anyoen any good.
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#3 KaptainCavy  Icon User is offline

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Re: Computer Organization or Set Theory?

Posted 02 August 2012 - 09:44 AM

View PostDarenR, on 02 August 2012 - 09:37 AM, said:

Yeah I never heard of any of those classes or what they do. I went for BS in Software Engineering. So to sum up what your saying is that you are unsure as to how much work you can handle while taking college courses. Well talk to others who have taken the courses and ask them how much work is really involved and thus you will have your answer. Just remeber over taxing yourself never does anyoen any good.


Exactly! Which is why I am in a bind right now.

Set Theory -
Propositional and predicate logic; mathematical induction. Logic and structure of sets as related to mathematical proof. Relations, and cardinality.

Computer Organization -
An overview of computer organization and design including Boolean algebra, combinational and sequential circuits, data
representation, register transfer and microoperations, CPU organization, microprogrammed control, and machine language programming.

Discrete Structures -
Propositional and predicate logic, mathematical induction, and recursion. Sets, relations, functions. Graphs and trees. Boolean algebra and computer logic. Finite state machines and computability.

Data Structures -
Trees, graphs, and other forms of data structures and their implementations. Emphasizing abstract data types; static memory allocation vs. dynamic storage allocation; searching, hashing, and sorting methods; algorithm analysis.
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#4 modi123_1  Icon User is offline

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Re: Computer Organization or Set Theory?

Posted 02 August 2012 - 09:48 AM

Here's the funny thing - different colleges (event teachers) present different material. If you want a real honest decision then I would call up your degree's department and talk to a counselor. They would have a better handle on what would make a specific class harder or easier than say random people on the internet.
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#5 macosxnerd101  Icon User is online

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Re: Computer Organization or Set Theory?

Posted 02 August 2012 - 09:54 AM

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Set Theory -
Propositional and predicate logic; mathematical induction. Logic and structure of sets as related to mathematical proof. Relations, and cardinality.

I've taken two very different Discrete Math classes. Your set theory class encompasses about a third of what we did in Discrete Math last semester. Your Discrete Structures class looks like about half of what we did in my first Discrete Math class (we did combinatorics, number theory, and discrete probability instead of theory of computation). Graph theory is a big plus for data structures. Set theory looks like a good complement (no pun intended) for Discrete Structures. Computer Organization is usually low-level programming (C and Assembly) and digital circuits/logic.

You'll have to make your decision, but that's my take on how the classes fit together.
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#6 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is online

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Re: Computer Organization or Set Theory?

Posted 02 August 2012 - 10:19 AM

A few thoughts, for what they're worth. Same caveat as before: I don't know your school or how these classes are taught there, please consult an advisor in your CS department.

- calculus will do you little good in set theory. Set theory is math in the sense of formal reasoning about abstract concepts, not in the sense of tools for doing things with numbers. It's a lot of fun, but your logic course will be much more useful than your calculus. (Geometry may be useful, in that you'll likely be doing a lot of proofs)

- Set theory, wherever you get it from, is enormously useful to the programmer. It gives you tools for reasoning about groups of things, and the operations of boolean logic can be derived from the machinery of set theory, which is nice. Also, the integers and their basic properties can be derived from set theory as well, but that doesn't turn out to be very useful to us. Interesting, though.

- from what you post, it looks like your Computer Organization course will rely on concepts you'll be getting in Data Structures. You might want to put it off while you're getting the Data Structures down, unless the two are designed to complement each other. (which is possible: see your advisor)

- Set theory and discrete structures seem to cover similar ground from different points of view. Might be a lot of overlap, or they might really work well together. All together now: see your advisor.
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