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#1 Halovian  Icon User is offline

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Beginning a "Company Organizer" program, looking for some guid

Posted 16 August 2012 - 12:49 PM

Truthfully I am not well versed in C# and am simply looking for some experienced users to tell me whether or not my project is too ambitious to learn all of the required coding in a short-ish period of time.

Attached is a sketch of what the program's final GUI should look like.
Is this layout feasible?

The 'Update Meeting' button should output data to an excel document, first bringing up a window to indicate the date of the meeting.
The 'Schedule Meeting' button should open an outlook window with the client's email pre-entered.
The 'Contact Box' section should import the data from an excel sheet containing [nicely ordered] data.

The goal of this program is to eventually replace the need for the microsoft suite and so dual input-output functionality between microsoft programs and the organizer is critical.

I'm not looking for any code, though if you have a sample you'd like to share I certainly won't object.
Any tips or documents you can link explaining on how to accomplish these tasks is much appreciated!

Thanks in advance

This post has been edited by Curtis Rutland: 16 August 2012 - 07:06 PM
Reason for edit:: removed attachment


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Replies To: Beginning a "Company Organizer" program, looking for some guid

#2 tlhIn`toq  Icon User is offline

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Re: Beginning a "Company Organizer" program, looking for some guid

Posted 16 August 2012 - 01:04 PM

View PostHalovian, on 16 August 2012 - 01:49 PM, said:

Truthfully I am not well versed in C# and am simply looking for some experienced users to tell me whether or not my project is too ambitious to learn all of the required coding in a short-ish period of time.


So you want to learn C# as you design this application? Then *yes* it is too ambitious. We say it here all the time: Do not try to develop a program WHILE you try to learn C#. You simply lack any understanding of the language, OOP, underlying concepts, .NET framework. How can you design a program if you have no idea what tools or materials are available to you or how to even use the tools?

View PostHalovian, on 16 August 2012 - 01:49 PM, said:

Attached is a sketch of what the program's final GUI should look like.
Is this layout feasible?

Of course it is. Anything is feasible.

View PostHalovian, on 16 August 2012 - 01:49 PM, said:

The goal of this program is to eventually replace the need for the microsoft suite and so dual input-output functionality between microsoft programs and the organizer is critical.

Office suite was developed by an experienced team of a couple hundred people over a period of many release versions. And you think you can replace it as a rookie still learning C#? I'm not sure if that's funny or just insulting to all of us that earn our living developing software.

View PostHalovian, on 16 August 2012 - 01:49 PM, said:

Any tips or documents you can link explaining on how to accomplish these tasks is much appreciated!


First learn the language by working 2-5 "Learn C# in 30 days" type books cover to cover. Do a couple hundred on-line tutorial projects where you build what you're told to build, the way you are told to build it WITH AN EXPLANATION OF WHY so you can learn.

Then later you can start architecting your own simple stuff. Build a calculator. Build a DVD library program. Etc. Stuff that doesn't involve the complexity of a game. Then move up to games.



There are three routes people seem to take when learning programming.
  • Just start trying to create programs
  • Start taking apart other programs and try to figure out the language by reverse engineering
  • Follow a guided learning course (school or self-teaching books)


For the life of me I can't figure out why people try 1 & 2. I strongly suggest taking the guided learning approach. Those book authors go in a certain order for a reason: They know what they're doing and they know the best order to learn the materials.

Quote

Where do I start?


You start by learning a coding language FIRST.
Learn to plan before you type.
THEN you start designing software with a purpose.


If this sounds like you

Newbie/Rookie said:

I have a little programming experience but I need to write ...
read this section
Spoiler


Otherwise, you can just jump to the resources here:
Some of the tutorials below are for C# or Java not C, C++, VB.NET [...]. But the conceptual stuff of classes, object oriented design, events etc. are not language specific and should give you enough guidance in theory of program development for you to be able to look-up specific code example in your chosen coding language.



Resources, references and suggestions for new programmers. - Updated Mar 2012
Spoiler

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