10 Replies - 726 Views - Last Post: 08 September 2012 - 03:57 AM

#1 Utael  Icon User is offline

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C# Visual Studio Professor

Posted 29 August 2012 - 08:26 PM

So, I know its only the first week, but I'm still a little worried about my professors methods. We made one of our first programs, It was a label with two buttons. We built it first with the GUI. Now normally this wouldn't bother me but considering this is an intro to programming and the most code we wrote was helped by VS by choosing events from a drop down list in the design view.

Any thoughts on if I should continue with my own learning on my own (still attending classes, since I've already payed for them) but learning more on my own and just getting the assignments done before hand?

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#2 modi123_1  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Visual Studio Professor

Posted 29 August 2012 - 08:28 PM

Is it the pace that's slow or some issue with VS hooking up events for you? If am not sure why you would *WANT* to keep pace with the class! Take what you are learning and apply it in different ways!
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#3 Martyr2  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Visual Studio Professor

Posted 29 August 2012 - 08:34 PM

Keep in mind that many classes actually start off very slow and pick up quickly. I have been in some programming classes that were awfully slow and decided to learn stuff on my own. But by the end, it had become quite a challenge.

I say learning on your own is ALWAYS advantageous to you and I encourage you to stay with the class, learn on the side and you will have one of two outcomes...

1) The class never picks up speed and you will have learned a lot on your own. You win.

2) The class picks up speed where you learn a lot and you learn on your own as well. You win even more.

Either way, you win. :)

This post has been edited by Martyr2: 29 August 2012 - 08:35 PM

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#4 Utael  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Visual Studio Professor

Posted 29 August 2012 - 08:43 PM

My issue is not really learning code, but rather learning the IDE, this wont help me in a professional setting when a boss asks me to write in VB when all I've done is make an IDE write C# for me. It may just be her intro for new students, since I have an "Internet Programming Essentials" course. (yes we know HTML is not a programming language, she even told the class why). We immediately went to code, using Notepad++ :rockon:
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#5 modi123_1  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Visual Studio Professor

Posted 29 August 2012 - 11:48 PM

Yeah, but see the forest instead of the tree. Wiring up an event is what - about three lines of code for vb.net or c# - having VS make it for you isn't the end of the world... the key is learning how events operate and when to use them.
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#6 The Architect 2.0  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Visual Studio Professor

Posted 06 September 2012 - 03:06 PM

i've never heard of anyone in a professional setting (hell, any setting) choosing to write out GUI code for a C#.NET application by hand.

why would your boss pay you to take more time and likely make more mistakes in the process?

no, you're fine. it's perfectly normal to have the IDE help you. if this is too 'wimpy' for you; go learn C instead. if C is too wimpy for you, go learn assembly.

you're falling into the trap of thinking that rewriting standard string libraries makes you a better programmer.
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#7 Utael  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Visual Studio Professor

Posted 06 September 2012 - 10:30 PM

Actually no, I learned java in a basic text editor, I learned it much more in depth than I am learning c# now.

My issue is when a professor is teaching dependency on an ide, are they really teaching you to code or just teaching you how to use the IDE.
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#8 JackOfAllTrades  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Visual Studio Professor

Posted 07 September 2012 - 06:49 AM

The thing is, C# and the other .NET languages -- Mono Project aside -- are heavily tied to the Visual Studio IDE. Any professional shop doing .NET development is going to have you use Visual Studio. If you're looking to work with .NET once you're out in the workforce, then you've definitely got a leg up.
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#9 The Architect 2.0  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Visual Studio Professor

Posted 08 September 2012 - 12:27 AM

View PostUtael, on 06 September 2012 - 11:30 PM, said:

My issue is when a professor is teaching dependency on an ide, are they really teaching you to code or just teaching you how to use the IDE.


He's teaching you useful, practical skills for when you graduate/complete the class.

people will think you're just weird if you manually bind your event handlers.
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#10 Lemur  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Visual Studio Professor

Posted 08 September 2012 - 12:40 AM

If you know C# (well), VB and Java are trivial.

Personally, I don't like GUIs, but this coming from a *nix SysAdmin type, your mileage may vary. I also come from a method of thinking that you'd have to be a masochist to use .NET for extended periods of time. Do note, personal opinions and whatnot. I learned C# and VS in College, and I still quite notably detest them.

Depending on what you want to do with your life, you should look into another language.

If you want hardware, start moving down to C and Assembly.
If you want job security, and a neverending nightmare, go for COBOL or RPG.
If you want mobile, learn Objective-C and Java.
If you want to be an Admin, learn Ruby or Python.
If you want to have an enlightenment session, try LISP.
If you want to blow your mind, try a different paradigm like Functional Programming.

It all depends.

I had to sit through slower C# classes, and in the mean time I was developing servers and multi-os automated networks. I can't say my grades had a very good time of it, considering I was far more interested in those pet projects than in my actual school work.

Speaking of which, get assignments done as early as possible, the more procrastination the worse it will end. The last thing you want is to have to retake an already boring class because you blew it off too much.
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#11 Utael  Icon User is offline

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Re: C# Visual Studio Professor

Posted 08 September 2012 - 03:57 AM

I'll start looking into c, I'm a month ahead of my peers and am notoriosly let out of class early in lab time
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