4 Replies - 319 Views - Last Post: 06 September 2012 - 07:34 PM

#1 Unit3000  Icon User is offline

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New (hopefully) Python programmer

Posted 04 September 2012 - 11:37 PM

I've been learning Python 3 for the last few months, I've got the basics down (I'm a slow learner). Now all I need to do is write some programs, although it turns out that's hardly than I thought. I get ideas for programs but have no idea on how to design them.

Ah well, I guess practice is the best way forward.

Anyway, hello!
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#2 Ticon  Icon User is offline

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Re: New (hopefully) Python programmer

Posted 05 September 2012 - 07:31 PM

Welcome to DIC, be sure to show work if your going to ask for help. I'm sure you will do excellent in python however :) It is an excellent way to learn programming!
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#3 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is online

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Re: New (hopefully) Python programmer

Posted 05 September 2012 - 07:56 PM

MIT Open CourseWare has an excellent course for you. It's usually referred to as "MIT's python course" but it's actually "MIT's programming course" which happens to use python. If you follow the lectures and do the reading and especially if you do all the assignments (and read and understand all of the code provided for the assignments) you'll get a very good idea of how problem solving works, and how to use python to help you do it. I worked through a fair bit of that material this summer, and I learned a lot. I did the course with a few other people, one of my old professors and some people he rounded up to take the course with him. That was a great way to do it, we'd meet once a week to go over the material and keep each other on track. If you have a few friends who are also serious about learning to program well, you might propose such a thing to them.

That being said, the best way to learn to program is to write a lot of programs. Start with simple ones and make mistakes: making mistakes is good, as long as you don't keep making the same ones over and over.
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#4 Unit3000  Icon User is offline

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Re: New (hopefully) Python programmer

Posted 06 September 2012 - 07:28 PM

View PostTicon, on 05 September 2012 - 07:31 PM, said:

Welcome to DIC, be sure to show work if your going to ask for help. I'm sure you will do excellent in python however :) It is an excellent way to learn programming!


Thanks man!

View Postjon.kiparsky, on 05 September 2012 - 07:56 PM, said:

MIT Open CourseWare has an excellent course for you. It's usually referred to as "MIT's python course" but it's actually "MIT's programming course" which happens to use python. If you follow the lectures and do the reading and especially if you do all the assignments (and read and understand all of the code provided for the assignments) you'll get a very good idea of how problem solving works, and how to use python to help you do it. I worked through a fair bit of that material this summer, and I learned a lot. I did the course with a few other people, one of my old professors and some people he rounded up to take the course with him. That was a great way to do it, we'd meet once a week to go over the material and keep each other on track. If you have a few friends who are also serious about learning to program well, you might propose such a thing to them. That being said, the best way to learn to program is to write a lot of programs. Start with simple ones and make mistakes: making mistakes is good, as long as you don't keep making the same ones over and over.


I'm guessing this is for Python 2? I've been learning Python 3.2.3 for the last few months, are the videos still useful for Python 3? They do look very interesting.
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#5 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is online

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Re: New (hopefully) Python programmer

Posted 06 September 2012 - 07:34 PM

Python 2 is what's used in the course (2.6, I think) but you should be able to make it work. If nothing else, you can just run the homework code through the 2 to 3 converter and then you're good, but it's probably worth learning to work with python 2, since there's going to be lots of that floating around for the foreseeable future.
The lectures don't spend a lot of time on the mechanics of the code, they're more about what you can do with the code, so for the lectures whether you use 2 or 3 is not important.
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