Youtube programming

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#1 Michael26  Icon User is offline

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Youtube programming

Posted 12 September 2012 - 01:16 PM

What do you think about learning from Youtube videos, some people prefer the visual component of learning(I.E seeing stuff being done instead reading it from a book)

Some examples(random, not advertisement)
http://www.youtube.c...s/videos?view=0
http://www.youtube.c...8CA7A1B33CBEE50

Also i noticed there are some college materials on YT from Stanford, MIT 6.00 Intro to Computer Science & Programming, Fall 2008

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Replies To: Youtube programming

#2 Ryano121  Icon User is offline

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Re: Youtube programming

Posted 12 September 2012 - 01:30 PM

In principle I think they are a good idea, however you see way too many examples out there (especially on Youtube) where the host literally haven't got a clue what they are talking about. They start you off with a few buttons and a messagebox and pretend they can program. Most of the time they give people bad practices and bad knowledge.

So yeah they could be good but so many have failed. Personally I still think a good book is best for learning. You can bring up the whole 'I'm a visual learner' as much as you want, but in my opinion this is just an excuse for someone to sit there and watch a video rather than reading a book. For the most knowledge for the least time books are better imo, videos can be very drawn out.
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#3 Michael26  Icon User is offline

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Re: Youtube programming

Posted 12 September 2012 - 01:48 PM

I have seen very bad examples mostly from people of India, for example most of them would build sql string right into the code that is not properly handled(it is full of sql injection traps, they say they will fix it in the next video but they never do).

I'm currently torn between reading a book or watching a video, but i always try to code by myself.
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#4 NecroWinter  Icon User is offline

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Re: Youtube programming

Posted 13 September 2012 - 06:58 PM

Ive seen good and bad. "Thenewboston" seems to break things down well. Like with anything on youtube, theres gonna be good and bad
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#5 luckielordie  Icon User is offline

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Re: Youtube programming

Posted 26 November 2012 - 07:53 AM

Yeah this is a grey area for me. For every good piece of informative well presented info there is 2-3 tutorials that just don't quite cut it.
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#6 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is online

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Re: Youtube programming

Posted 26 November 2012 - 08:11 AM

I honestly don't see what's gained by video tutorials. What is the advantage over written materials?
Basically, both present code examples and commentary about the language, in various proportions. The main difference is that in one, the code example is animated and in the other it's static.

When I look at this, the advantage seems to be all with the printed word. Text on the page can be read silently about five times as fast as it can be read aloud, so there's a huge loss of efficiency. When you're reading a text on the page, there's no interface to play with - if you want to make a note of something, you just stop reading and write it down, and then you start reading again. There's no buttons to push, no spinning cursors, no bother. You can make notes in the margins of a book, and they're there the next time you go to look at it again - for example "this example is wrong, it should be foo instead of bar", which can be very useful if you're using the book for reference later. Can't do this with a video tutorial.
So what's the benefit?

This post has been edited by jon.kiparsky: 26 November 2012 - 08:12 AM

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#7 YasuoDancez  Icon User is offline

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Re: Youtube programming

Posted 27 November 2012 - 06:23 PM

View Postjon.kiparsky, on 26 November 2012 - 08:11 AM, said:

I honestly don't see what's gained by video tutorials. What is the advantage over written materials?
Basically, both present code examples and commentary about the language, in various proportions. The main difference is that in one, the code example is animated and in the other it's static.

When I look at this, the advantage seems to be all with the printed word. Text on the page can be read silently about five times as fast as it can be read aloud, so there's a huge loss of efficiency. When you're reading a text on the page, there's no interface to play with - if you want to make a note of something, you just stop reading and write it down, and then you start reading again. There's no buttons to push, no spinning cursors, no bother. You can make notes in the margins of a book, and they're there the next time you go to look at it again - for example "this example is wrong, it should be foo instead of bar", which can be very useful if you're using the book for reference later. Can't do this with a video tutorial.
So what's the benefit?


jon, I think that being a programmer has you thinking about the number of operations and efficiency. :D/>

Imo, It really does not make a difference if one can read faster than one watching a video. What matters first is that they take in and understand the info. It is a matter of quality over quantity (or understanding thoroughly over efficiency). Even if a person can read text on a page 5x faster than watching some portion of a video, it depends on the person, and how well they can comprehend and interpret that piece of information. Some may be more efficient at understanding the video quicker than that same info that is in a book.

If one really wanted to, one could develop a program that has a video player with a side margin that keeps notes at specific timelines. jon, you should understand that. We are the ones that make these things possible. Other than that, it is not too difficult to open a word document and keep notes for the video if wanted. Then, pause watching the video at a specific point and type the needed info.

With videos, there is no paper to get paper cuts from, no losing and ripping pages, less mass to carry around ( possibly, depending on the laptop size compared to a book ).

Not that I do not agree, I think books are the first option that one should use, but with the proper videos, they are no less of a gain.
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#8 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is online

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Re: Youtube programming

Posted 27 November 2012 - 06:51 PM

When I say text can be "read" I mean of course "read and and understood" - not simply talking about how fast you can move your eyes across the paper, but how fast you can read and absorb the material. It's a simple observation based on ten years in radio that reading aloud for public consumption, I budgeted five minutes delivery time for a single-side of letter paper (A4) which I could read comfortably in a minute. For a similar comparison, compare the coverage of a daily half-hour news broadcast with the same stories as covered in the New York Times or some similarly adult newspaper. The news broadcast will cover less material (fewer stories), in less depth (fewer details per story), and I assure you that there's no problem in getting through the front section of the Times in half an hour.

Now perhaps some material is more dense and takes longer to read, and tech material will likely fall into this category if anything does, but the same factors will slow down your oral comprehension as well, so you're going to have to pause more and the loss of time will be commensurate. In fact, as I say, it's easier to break out and return to a printed text than a spoken one, so you're likely to lose more time on the oral delivery due to complexity.

As for note-taking, it would have to be very sophisticated software indeed to stop the lecture when you're taking notes (the way you stop reading, automatically, when you're taking notes from a book), or else you're going to lose a lot of material to note-taking.

Now, you suggest that some people might not absorb written material as readily as spoken material. That's true, but if you can't absorb written material quickly and easily, I would have to wonder if programming is really going to be your forte. Most of what you do as a programmer, after all, is understand printed material.

Also, I should point out, a book is a cheap, proven technology which is incredibly durable, requires no power beyond an available light source, and is incredibly resistant to viruses and format decay.

So to overcome all of this, the video must have some real advantages. What are they?
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#9 YasuoDancez  Icon User is offline

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Re: Youtube programming

Posted 30 November 2012 - 01:28 PM

I think the advantages to videos, given a good video tutor, are that they can be easier to understand. They give a more visual animated approach. For example, If a complete beginner is learning about data and search algorithms, It would be much easier to see how an ArrayList inserts from the middle of the Array, pushing other elements behind it over through the use of videos. No doubt books can be accompanied by site power points and flash animations. The advantage of a video over a book and a book over a video also depends on the complexity of the content.

True, a book is more thorough and in-depth. I agree as a programmer, we should get use to reading material.

For school, what I typically do is study some material in a book, then I use a video tutorial for backup.

In my spare time, I also turn towards video tutorials with out the reference of a book.
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#10 macosxnerd101  Icon User is online

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Re: Youtube programming

Posted 30 November 2012 - 02:02 PM

The more senses are involved in learning, the better that person learns. Video tutorials add more visual and auditory. When it comes down to tweaking code though, Youtube tutorials aren't always the best. Sometimes the videos are fuzzy and it's hard to read the code. With static webpages or books, code is easier to read and play around with.
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#11 YasuoDancez  Icon User is offline

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Re: Youtube programming

Posted 03 December 2012 - 01:52 AM

That is when the video creator should either provide source code along with the video, or have a good enough video program where they can zoom in on code segments/blocks.
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#12 cfoley  Icon User is offline

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Re: Youtube programming

Posted 05 December 2012 - 05:55 PM

I tend to agree with macos on this one. Given a good video on programming, it's going to be better for learning than the equivalent written tutorial. Unfortunately, good video tutorials are hard to come by.
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#13 YasuoDancez  Icon User is offline

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Re: Youtube programming

Posted 07 December 2012 - 04:30 PM

You tend to agree with MacOS, wasn't I the one who originally stated this in my posts? :unsure:
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#14 Michael26  Icon User is offline

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Re: Youtube programming

Posted 03 June 2013 - 01:09 PM

Another great learning option, not just for IT.

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#15 jon.kiparsky  Icon User is online

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Re: Youtube programming

Posted 03 June 2013 - 01:22 PM

View Postmacosxnerd101, on 30 November 2012 - 04:02 PM, said:

The more senses are involved in learning, the better that person learns.


This seems a dubious proposition to me. If you included smell-o-vision in a tutorial, it would be more effective? I don't think so.
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